Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
File 028
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 028. 1956-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/937.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 028. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/937

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 028, 1956-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/937.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 028
Transcript CONDENSATION OF Dr. Richard Sorge was intelligent and proficient in organizing the spy ring. The author describes him OS "a natural linguist who could converse easily in French, English, Russian, Japanese and possibly Chinese." 'IDE Wiilll.D PHOTO party, which had just seized power under Adolf Hitler; and his credentials were accepted without question. How he secured these excellent covers remains a mystery but is a suggestive index of long-range Soviet preparations. Dr. Sorge proceeded to Japan via the United States and Canada. In Tokyo he found a house in a good neighborhood, made himself known at the German Embassy and the German Club and was readily accepted by the German community as well as by his colleagues of the press. However, this was explicable on grounds of Sorge's friendship with the German Colonel Ott, while stationed in China. As a lucky break for Sorge, Ott was to become Ambassador in Tokyo at a later date. It is astonishing that despite Japanese deep suspicion of foreigners, their alertness to the remotest indication of espionage or Communist sympathies, despite the insularity of their country forcing couriers to enter or leave only through well-guarded ports, neither the Japanese civil police, the special higher police, nor any other Japanese security agent ever had the remotest suspicion of Sorge or anv one of his gang of 16 men and women. Sorge had the advantage of being the protege of Colonel Ott. We have had similar proteges in the United States, viz: Dexter White sponsored by Morgenthatt; Agnes Smedley sponsored by Harold Ickes and Secretary Royall, as late as 1949. Sorge's most valuable single associate in Japan was Ozaki Hozumi, born in 1901, the son of a Japanese journalist. Graduated from the Law School of Tokyo Imperial University in 1925, he then spent a year of postgraduate reading, chiefly in economics and sociology. By 1940 the men of his class were holding positions of great responsibility throughout Japan, especially in the bureaus and ministries of the Imperial government. Any young man as brilliant as Ozaki Hozumi was certain to make and keep many close friends who would know almost everything there was to know and would share their knowledge with a trusted confidant. Gradually his sympathies drifted toward communism. He never admitted to membership in the Communist party - party sympathy is enough to Page 26 develop and launch a high-class agent and spy. Following his father's footsteps, he became a journalist; in 1927 was sent to Shanghai as special correspondent of the great paper, Osaka Asahi. He remained in China for three years, during which time he met and worked \v itli Sorge; also met Agnes Smedley, the American Communis' spy. He came to be known as a leading expert on Chinese affairs; wrote widely on the subject; attended the Yosemitc Conference of the Institute of Pacific Relations (I.P.R.) in 1936 as one of the Japanese delegates. The I.P.R. has been indicted by bipartisan Congressional Committees as an "instrument of Soviet espionage and imperialism I it will be seen that members of that Institute played significant roles in the Sorge case. In 1938 Ozaki became unofficial adviser to the Cabin''' under Prince Konoye; in 19.39, unofficial adviser to the Tokyo office of the South Manchurian Railway—an invaln' able assignment to a man who wanted to learn of Japan s plans and capabilities for war with the Soviet Union. TW infiltration in high places is a Communist specialty. Ozaki 1 success is no more astonishing than Alger Hiss' role, in 9 similar position. Sorge lived on intimate, trusted terms with the Cenn1" Ambassador and his staff; Ozaki Hozumi had a sirni'8' close relationship to Prince Konoye, thrice premier. FroU1 these perfect sources they transmitted intelligence to tnj USSR by concealed radio, by special courier, an' through the Soviet Embassy. The last channel was co& sidered risky and not resorted to until the very last. Sorge Tokyo transmitter was sheltered in the house of Gunth» Stein, associated with the I.P.R, and later to become cC respondent of the Manchester Guardian. Sorge was a natural linguist and could converse cas' ? in French, English, Russian, Japanese, and possiM Chinese. In Germany he had studied at the universities " Berlin, Kiel, and Hamburg, receiving a degree of Doc'0 of Political Science at Hamburg in 1920. During the Fir$ World War he had begun the systematic study of Mart1* literature and had converted himself, joining the Hambu1? branch of the German Communist party in 1919. He ^ successful in covering this vulnerable association. In a course, after he reached Tokyo, he received his Nazi pa ™ card. Seemingly, in the years following until 1941, it nev occurred to anyone to run a file check on Dr. Rich*' Sorge. His Party card was considered [even by l Gestapo] sufficient evidence of his loyalty. JVleanwhile, that extraordinary international organi/at"1 the "Comintern," tool of the Russian Foreign Office, at ™, request of the Red Army, began picking up Conim11"" agents and moving them around the world. Evidc" regarding world-wide Comintern card-lists and con"" ,li produced at the Canadian spy inquiry is corroborated I the evidence of the prior Sorge trial. In due <'"'"'',. the Comintern agents in France and the United St" . received orders. Men who were complete strangers to ''•' I other and who had never heard the name of Surge b^l packing their bags for Tokyo; the two key figures *% Branko de Voukelitch from Paris, and Miyagi Yotoku '''' Los Angeles. De Voukelitch was a Yugoslav, living in Paris with a wife. He had become interested in Marxian movelD* Facts Forum News, March,
File Name uhlib_1352973_v005_n003_028.jpg