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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
File 021
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 021. 1956-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/930.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 021. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/930

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 021, 1956-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/930.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 021
Transcript assist in the reconstruction and repair of Primate Wyszynski's residence. For several months preceding the cardinal's arrest, the secret police recorded every conversation held in his residence. In the middle of 1953, General Swietlik, Vice-Minister of Poland's Ministry of Security and an old army Wend of Swiatlo's, invited Swiatlo to j" company him on a visit to the Lidz- hark district of Poland. Swietlik prom- 1S('d to show Swiatlo "something of "nusual interest." The "something" turned out to be the monastery that was to be Cardinal Wyszynski's Prison. This trip was made a short '"ne before Bierut and Mazur traveled to Moscow to obtain formal eon- Sent for the arrest of Poland's Catholic Primate. Brigades of secret police officials, electronics experts, hydraulic engi- neers and masons were at work in the ■nonasterv when Swietlik and Swiatlo ■["ived. They went up to the first jtoor, where two cells and a bath were bejng prepared for the cardinal. Two '"'iglilioring cells were set aside for a JPecia] pair of secret police agents: a Priest" and a "nun." Other rooms ere to be used by a variety of guards 'u\(l. agents. . ' he last room on this floor was be- nR developed as a kind of master °ntrol room for the complex record- „ R and signal devices on the floor, ^ietlik explained to Swiatlo that ;'eh door was equipped with a spe- t]'al gadget that lighted up a dial on e master control board when that J'lriieiilar door opened. In this way, er>' movement of the cardinal and ,, erybody else would be known to the guards. In the floor of every room, and halfway up the walls, secret microphones were being installed; the cardinals footsteps would be heard even before the signal light flashed on. If the cardinal were to open the door leading downstairs to the garden, an additional alarm would be sounded. On such occasions, a guard would immediately station himself in an observation post of a high tree in the garden before the cardinal arrived. The park itself was surrounded by a high wall which was further protected by a high wire netting which would not permit the cardinal even to approach the wall. More secret police guards were to be stationed on the other side of the wall, day ami night. A corridor led from the cardinal's cells to a small chapel. Since the authorities had decided that it would not be a good idea to permit Cardinal Wyszynski to spend too much time in the chapel, this passageway was blocked by a glass doorway. The cardinal would not be permitted to enter the chapel without special permission from the Commander of the Guards. Such are the methods devised by General of the Army Serov in Soviet Russia's campaign to destroy the opposition and independence of the Catholic Church in Poland. V Combined Operations of RFE and Free Europe Press* There are two conventional ways ol sending publications into the Iron Curtain countries these days — one by ordinary mail, the other by air mail. Efforts along these lines encounter roadblocks from the fact that although the effective word can be said in this way, printed matter in the mass is likely to be confiscated at the border or at censorship depots. This fact led to consideration of the airborne leaflets as a means of reaching the captive peoples — a means which, following study and experimentation, turned out to be both practical and remarkably cheap. . . . The regime response _to this mild exploit was astonishing. Jet fighters attacked the balloons, anti-aircraft guns opened fire: the police were ordered to track down the leaflets; and the people were told to turn them in to the authorities. To cap the commotion, the Czechoslovak government delivered a long note of protest to the U. S. Department of State, which countered, with a whiff of irony, saying: "There would be no reason for a government to be disturbed by the principle of freedom in a message to its people, if conditions of freedom actually existed in that country." The profitable result of this operation, in terms of desired coverage and *Excerpts reprinted from President's Report for the Year 1954, by Whitney II. Shep- ardson, Free Europe Committee, Inc., 110 West 57th Street, New York 19, N. Y. This photograph, reaching Radio Free Europe in a letter smuggled out of Poland, shows one of the lost public celebrations of the Roman Catholic Church permitted by the Communist Worsaw regime. This shows part of the May 10, 1953, ceremonies in Krakow attending the 700th anniversary of the canonization of St. Stanislaw, patron saint of Poland, celebrated two days ofter the Polish Catholic bench of bishops protested strongly against interference and repression by the Communist regime. Following these ceremonies Primate Stefan Cardinal Wyszynski was "confined" to a monastery. Bishop Czeslaw Kacz- marek was sentenced to 12 years in prison on charges of treason and espionage, and at least six other church leaders were placed under house arrest or forcibly prevented from performing their priestly functions. WIDE WOHI.P rilOTll ■^^^ '" I'oiu v, News, March 1956 Page 19 /
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