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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 020. 1956-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/929.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 020. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/929

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 020, 1956-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/929.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript Soviet Campaign to Destroy Poland's Catholic Church Soviet plans to infiltrate and subvert the Catholic Church in Poland were exposed in a new series of six programs broadcast to Poland over Radio Free Europe by Josef Swiatlo in September, 1955. In this more recent series Swiatlo revealed the following facts: 1. The present chief of Soviet Russia's secret police. General Ivan- ov Serov, organized and still directs the Polish regime's campaign to destroy the independence and opposition of the Catholic Church. 2. Communist agents follow every move of imprisoned Cardinal W\-szynski, whose "residence" is wired and filled with hidden microphones. The cardinal must obtain special permission to visit his chapel. 3. The so-called "patriot priests" in Poland serve under duress, as tools of the secret police. Most of them were physically and mentally broken down by Nazi or Soviet concentration camps. 4. Swiatlo himself participated in the Soviet campaign against the Catholic Church. In the religious sphere, the Holy Synod of the Bulgarian Orthodox ( huii-li dissolved the Union of Clerical Brotherhood (in September, 1955), whose memhership consisted mainly of parish priests. The chief ollieial reason given for this move was that the Union leaders had "adopted a policy of counteraction and contradiction" in their relations with the Holy Synod. The Union leadership, whirh was known to he infiltrated by Communists and Communist sympathizers, was accused of working against the unity of the Churrh and failing to recognize the superior author. il> of the Holy Synod. The dissolution followed shortly a visit of Patriarch Kiril to Chervenkov, which indicated that the regime had approved dishanding the organization as a source of friction to the Church leadership. The regime still retains control of the Church, however, through a special committee attarhed to the Council of Ministers. (Reprinted from "The Month in Review," Sews from Behind the Iron Curtain. October, 1955.) A digest of the six Swiatlo programs on the Catholic Church of Poland follows: General Ivanov Serov, present chief of Soviet Russia's secret police, is author of the Communist campaign to infiltrate, subvert and seize control of the Catholic Church in Poland. Serov, who was recently named a general ol the army, is chairman of the USSR State Security Committee, attached to the Council of Ministers. The campaign against Poland's Catholic Church is simply the enforcement of the Serov plans. Serov is still in charge of the anti-Church program. Swiatlo and Serov met in 1945, when Serov was Soviet Russia's NKVD boss in Poland. It was Serov's job to prepare Poland for the imposition of Soviet-controlled Communist rule. Swiatlo was transferred from the Polish army to Serov's command. They got to know each other well, and Serov relied heavily on Swiatlo for information on Polish political affairs and personnel. It was at that time that Serov blue-printed a program for seizing control of the Catholic Church. Four top Polish Communists were assigned the job of turning the Church into a Communist bureau: Franciszek Mazur, Secretary of the Communist party's Central Committee; Wolski- Piwowarczyk, Minister of Public Administration; Boleslaw Piasecki, the regime's "Catholic" leader, and Domi- nik Horodynski, Piasecki's assistant. Without exception, these four men are agents of the MVD. Mazur is the man who traveled to Moscow to confirm the indictment against Bishop Kaczmarek. He also worked out the details of Cardinal Wyszynski's arrest while in Moscow. Piwowarczyk is the link between Mazur and the so-called Office of Denominational Affairs, attached to the Presidium of the Council of Ministers. Piasecki was a Nazi collaborator and agent — an offense for which he could have received a death sentence when Russia "liberated" Poland. Instead, Serov offered to let him go free if he agreed to become an NKVD agent and join the regime campaign to make the Catholic Church in Poland an obedient instrument of Soviet policy. Piasecki accepted this offer after many long personal talks with Serov. Horodynski, who ostensibly works for Piasecki, is Roleslaw Bierut's personal agent for Catholic affairs. Bierut win! WOBL '" Stefan Cardinal Wyszynski, Polish Primate of '^ Roman Catholic Church, is still confined 'n closely guarded and wired monastery, despite [ peoted announcements by the Polish author!'1 that he will be released "very soon." is official head of Poland's Commurf regime as well as the Commurt party boss in Poland. . , So far, Serov's master plan to ni8* the Catholic Church a tool of * Polish regime has met with no sU... cess. No more than 60 of PolaJ*>J 10,000 priests have succumbed pressure to collaborate with '" regime. In many cases, they are rt" who have been physically and morn ■ broken down by Soviet or Nazi c° eventration camps. The Communists utilized pl;intj microphones adeptly in its war aga"'' the Church. Piasecki himself used technical masterpiece to record an 'J portant conversation with BisD Choromanski. It was a wallet-like j vice, concealed in the inside pocket ( Piasecki's jacket, and connected to thin wire which ran up his sleeve- I pressing a secret button, he C°l record his complete conversation vVL the bishop — to be used, if needed, „ of ^ h*. Page 18 future trials. The archives secret police are filled with slll'''i'11 cordings of conversations with '" Catholic dignitaries. m Microphones are planted 'n . residences of many Catholic bish throughout Poland. The secret reC°J ing systems are particularly elab0' in Olsztyn, Tarnow, and WroclaV- c One of the biggest operations^ this kind was the installation of s^ listening apparatus in the resident . Primate Wyszynski in Warsaw. "mi for the wirings were made in SW^Jr1 Department Ten of the Polish **■ police. An electronics teehn1 , named Jadruszkiewicz was detail* ■ supervise this work, which was "d lessly executed when the Comfrt11 , regime decided magnanimously Facts Forum News, March,
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