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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
File 019
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 019. 1956-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/928.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 019. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/928

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 019, 1956-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/928.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript 1C . mi"; "'j and Moscow's watchdog in Poland; Colonel Rozanski; and Colonel Fejgin. All three of these officials had been heavily compromised in Swiatlo's personal broadcasts. The nature and tim- 'ng of these regime actions appear to establish the following relationship between RFE's broadcasts and actual Political developments in Poland: 1- The regime felt compelled to produce an "explanation" (in the form of scapegoats) to the Polish people because the RFE programs were so widely heard in Poland. 2. The Trybuna Ludu, organ of the Polish Communist party, published an editorial asserting that Swiatlo was an American intelligence agent, and established a direct causal link between Swiat- lo, his broadcasts, and the subsequent reorganization of the security service, including the removal of Radldewicz and the arrest of three other secret police officials. Regime response provides strong evidence of extreme sensitivity to materia] directed against the Party apparatus, anil of the regime's conviction that the broadcasts reached large audiences in Poland. The regime's denunciations of Swiatlo and snbsequent "corrective measures indicate an anxiety to provide the public with official explanations, and to convince party members that those responsible would he punished. Listener reaction from Poland to the 3. c -,'aiei rW8?0 Programs was rapid. On Octo- SW three (l',vs after RFE's first Rpp J" Program, a letter was sent to Jnp. nrom. Krakow. After compliment regard- „ ». - -»...r,w,,. ,1IH| 11, | fll'E commentaries - of s""sl°* Rodkiewicz was Poland's Min- t,ece»arv e,,',"y be,ore his 'emoval wos made ""«' Iter'. '""owing an expose of his activities 'Ktfb, Willi: WORLD PHOTO Josef Pisarik, Mrs. Libuse Cloud, and Vaclav Uhlik tell Radio Free Europe listeners how they made a successful dash through barbed wire to freedom across the Czech-West German border in a homemade armored car that completely fooled Czech guards. Mrs. Cloud is the Czech wife of a U. S. Army veteran. "elector Josef Swiatlo. tw^ Ko»i"M News, March, 1956 ing Swiatlo, the letter went on to say: lliis ex-Colonel is well named, i "Swiatlo" means "light" in Polish. I As thunder echoes en the ears el the listener, his words, unforced by torture -nal like tin- "Swiatlo" ol Lightning, illuminate the sinister clooni ill the dark dungeons which arc the h ilations (il the I". B., which is the NKVI) agenc) in Poland. The revelations sound simply sensational ... to hear details ahnnt the tentacles of the Moscow octopus in Poland is an uncommon item of sensational information. A listener from Poznan wrote: "... I should like to thank you for your precious information with which you are comforting ns so much. Quite recently you brought us very funny news, and all because a fuse blew and the light went off. (Polish word for 'fuse'' is "bezpiecznik" which also means a member of the "Bczpicka" or Security Police.) All the Polish nation is very happy about it. Now, due to Mr. J. S., we know a lot about comrade Tomasz. (Tomasz is the party name of Bierut, Communist boss of Poland, as first revealed by Swiatlo.) These are things which are interesting to every one of us." \ regular woman correspondent from Gdansk wrote: "We Poles loathe the hand of rogues who rule Poland. Down with them! The Polish nation wauls to be free. . . We demand that the Warsaw government be removed immediately and Bierut with it." A letter received from Ols/.tyn on January II carried greetings to those "who pierce the Iron Curtain and escape westward to freedom, i.e., Polish airmen, seamen, anil Josol Swiatlo. who are speaking the truth on behalf of the Polish nation." Information from other sources bear out the reactions as evidenced in letters, for example, another source stated: "Swiatlo's revelations made a deep impression in Poland: they aroused hopes that antagonism existing among the regime's bigwigs might increase and that the power of the omnipotent Bezpieka would be curtailed. People were very pleased that a high official of the Bezpieka was clever enough to escape, eluding his supervisors." Other listener response indicates much satisfaction and even malicious glee at Swiatlo's compromising of the regime and its individual pillars, particularly Bierut. There is little doubt about the widespread public enjoyment of the "true spectacle" of the "spokesmen of Socialist morality." On February 18, 1955, a 'Polish refugee reported the existence of posters in Gdansk openly attacking RFE and Swiatlo. The posters, first displayed the previous December on walls of buildings, in public transport vehicles, and on outdoor advertising hoards, warned the people against "traitor Swiatlo" and denounced the "lies and slander" of RFE. A quacking (luck, meant to indicate the "lying" character of the broadcasts, was done in bright red, according to the refugee. The same source reported that "the effects ol Swiatlo's disclosures were much mote far-reaching than people in the West realize. They were a serious blow to the Red regime in Warsaw. The ill-considered poster campaign in Gdansk proves how depressed and upset the Communists have become as a result of the Swiatlo revelations." He also stated that the poster display had been met with laughter and lieadshaking by the people of Gdansk "It has served only to call the attention of everyone in Gdansk to Swiatlo. And when the Communists themselves opened the Swiatlo affair to public discussion, thev made it possible for people to discuss Swiatlo in public without running the risk of being accused of listening to Radio Free Europe." Page 17
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