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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 015. 1956-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/924.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 015. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/924

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956 - File 015, 1956-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/979/show/924.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 3, March 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 015
Transcript York y°,\ c rao{0 appearance in public places where their recognition would be probable. They communicate through couriers and avoid the use of written communications. They instituted loyalty tests for all prospective underground personnel. They rotate the underground personnel to avoid detection ° ° *. They appear outside of hideouts only at night * * °. They use different automobiles, and the cars frequently are registered in fictitious names and not names of party members; the license plates are frequently changed. They have used extreme precautions in regard to surveillance, making rapid and frequent changes of conveyances, entering and leaving subways and buses just before the doors close, and doubling back on their course. Moscow Representative The keystone of the Communist Party hierarchy within Jhe United States is the representative of the Communist Int. B, ernational or its present equivalent, the Information w Ureau of the Communist and Workers' Parties, otherwise °wn as the Cominform. The statutes of the Communist Wernational adopted at its sixth congress in the summer -1928 formally authorize the sending of such representa- Ves to affiliated Communist Parties. Although the Com- unist International was allegedly dissolved in May, 1943, 'messes before the Committee on Un-American Activities ave disclosed in terms of their experience that these atutes are still fullv operative in actual fact although not QPenly acknowledged. Article III, section 22, of these statutes declares that - The E. C. C. I. i Executive Committee of the Communist Mernational) and its Presidium have the right to send their *Presentatives to the various Sections of the Communist international. Such representatives receive their instructions Win the E. C. C. I. or from its Presidium, and are responsible ™ 'hem for their activities. Representatives of the E. C. C. I. jj*ve ||„. fjgj,, ,„ |)articjpat,, In ,m.(.tings of the central Party ""lies as well as ol the local organizations of the Sections to vh'ch they arc sent • ° °. 'thev may • ° ° speak in opposi- ?* to the Central Committee of the given Section '"if e line o| il,,. Central Committee in question diverges from ™e instructions of the E. C. C. I. • • °. The E. C. C. I. and ™J Presidium also have the righl to send instructors to the ar'ous Sections of the Communist International. Cj%>earing on September 8, 1939, before the Special f»rrn"n'ttee °n Un-American Activities, Benjamin Gitlow, i,-„. ,er mi'mbcr of the executive committee of the Cornmu- ernational, former member of the political commit- ut Communist Party, USA, and one time its candi • Pow Vice-President of the United States, described the filt .l,'.'s °' these representatives or "reps" as they are A j representative of the C munisi International to the United Pari'S 'I"™" ,lis sU" '" ('"' United States was the boss of the lea I * ^e al,tonlaticaIly became a member of all the Parti8 committees of the party in the United States and te'rs "|Pat<'' in i,s deliberations and enjoyed a vote on mat- 'nirx ""' M>t',<l "p"" ° * * a" '"' '""' t0 ''" w',s to th, •' ,lis P°wer ;,"(l mandate as a C. I. representative, and " '"s view would prevail. Generally, American Commit- '.<* of d '"'sis _s,"t.iti Sever would take a position in opposition to the repre- lv«' of the Communist International. &U(feen years ,ater on November 22, 1946, Louis F. a tt\cn\ ,ormer managing editor of the Daily Worker and Pari ^er of the national committee of the Communist Ht'h'vi',' confirnled this picture when he described the ficlw , of Gerhard Eisler, alias Hans Berger. alias fcugen ' ""' ,atter lla<i been introduced to Budenz by the « e Vennis, former general secretary of the party, as •titer '(1"IVa'l'"t to ii representative of the Communist nat'«>nal." Mr. Budenz declared that- Benjamin Gitlow of New York (left) and Joseph Zack Kornfeder of Detroit, ex-Communist Party officials who have cooperated with congressional investigating committees in furnishing vital information regarding the operations and tactics of the Communist Party in the United States. They are shown 'right) in 1950 as they assist the American Legion in staging "Communist Day" in Mosrnee, Wisconsin. RIDE WORLD PHOTO 'A, , ts p, "in m News, March, 1956 the official representative of the Communist International is the chief communication officer who brings the line of the party over, who knows it, and who, in addition to that, is vested with a certain authority to intervene in party affairs if he judges that necessary. Mr. Budenz was notified by Dennis that he would "occa sionally receive instructions and communications from this Hans Berger," alias for Gerhard Eisler. Budenz described how Eisler (Berger) verbally flayed Daily Worker Editor Clarence Hathaway, "for almost half an hour." In The Communist of May, 1944, leading theoretical organ of the Communist Party, USA, Eisler (Berger) publicly castigated William Z. Foster, then chairman of the party. In neither case did these American Communist chieftains dare to reply. In the November, 1943, issue of The Communist, "Hans Berger" wrote an article entitled "Remarks on the Discussion Concerning the Dissolution of the Communist International," the purpose of which was to inform American Communists that "internationalism still lives." In The Communist of November, 1942, Eisler. posing as an American, explained the significance of "Twenty-five Years of Soviet Power." lie was for some time the brains behind Joseph Starobin, foreign editor of the Daily Worker, whom he employed as his mouthpiece. This will give some idea of the tremendous power wielded over the American Communist Party by its Moscow-anointed commissar. Others who have served in this capacity in the past include: C. Valetsky; Joseph Pogany, alias John Schwartz, alias John Pepper, alias John Swift: Boris Beinstein; S. Gussev, alias P. Green, alias Drabkin; Y. Sirola, alias Miller; Arthur Ewcrt, alias Braun. alias Brown, alias Berger; Harry Pollitt; Philip Dcngcl: B. Mikhailov, alias George Williams; Carl E. Johnson, alias Scott, alias Jensen; . ._..__. Peterson; . Marcus, alias M. Jenks; F. Marini, alias Mario Alpi, alias Fred Brown; William Bust; Willi Muenzenberg; Louis Gibarti; Baissa Irene Browder; Raymond Guyot; Boris Isakov, alias Boris Wil liams. At times two or more such commissars w ill be hen' simultaneously, each being assigned to some special task or campaign. There is method in Moscow's designation of foreign commissars for the American party as revealed by Jacob Page 13 V
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