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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 051. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/890.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 051. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/890

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 051, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/890.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 051
Transcript Book Reviews Consult your bookstore for books reviewed here — or write to publishers listed. a persons *", ■quilibriuni » render nut** dm judging n. If those » : they may ^ nent like th* ■ither shun t" ,-rlorm it «'* ,al by cap* iscs probaW ability, a ■ in which ° United -t0/haS served in " tnd folk* be to or whatj only viol?", the jurors >J ,ly but also itself. , j( t thing lS I i points oui such : i the i be true ng a juror ( rthoust s not tamft h-,,o it iS 0'., nost ' is ot » sot a >;;;;' nintrv. I ',„• dlocate l'',, it not ye' u L-sted I of this e* Secretary Stimson: A Study in Statecraft BV Richard N. Current, Rutgers University rress, New Brunswick, N, J., 1954, ix, 272 pp.. This is the first presentation of the motives and conduct of any of the outstanding American public figures w'io put the United States into the ?econd World War which is both real- Ishc and concentrates almost wholly upon foreign policy, fohn T. Flynn's I he Roosevelt Myth dealt more at Iength with the President's domestic policy than with his foreign program, "obert Sherwood's Roosevelt and '"I'kins was an unabashed apology r the works and personalities of 'cse two men and gave as much attention to domestic as to foreign pol- CV- Professor Current devotes his .>()OK almost entirely to a critical and .ntornied survey of Stimson's career n relation to the various phases of our 0l'cign poljcy irl wnich stimson took ~ "'iidmir p^ for near]y forty years, ."e book is a masterpiece both of 'ls "'Hal scholarship and objective "raint. It gives us the first true pic- ,"'*' "I Stimson the man and Stimson ™» public servant. Current lets the , s te'l their own storv, rather than ^iect,ng facts to fit mt0 a precon. ail lnterPretation. D Altnough Stimson has been hailed • .powerful newspapers, generals and an 1 "ians as»a great "tower-" "P'"al" ' o column" among the Americans en °'l"i tilnc' ^evv PuWic reputations . '"libit- more completely before real- He", exposit,°n and objective analysis. on'-Ti'1'' RusseH once wrote an article -.., Hie Harm That Good Men Do." f '"> is essentially the story that Pro- ss°r Current's book tells relative to son F °areer of Henry L' Stim" . ', ew rnen brought more disaster o toe United States and the world in )le ,nt hmes than Mr. Stimson, and if bad not been restrained by more lev 1 u —* "v«*ii irauau ver keads like that o£ President Hoo- (11 r w°uld have been even more it'n{jcrous to his country and liuman- that • not an exaggeration to state so) • Vlr,n'ally every act and policy as- (.jciated with Stimson's public life, so mi t'l '* toile'le<' foreign policy, was of r|! " aml detrimental to the cause m-, i ce ancl justice. Two concessions gay be made to the r'e did, Stimson "myth.1 bid ".msofai' as his failing intellec- and physical powers permitted, Facts Forum News, February, 1956 conduct the War Department from June, 1940, until the end of the war in an efficient and non-partisan manner, and he vigorously opposed the disastrous Stalin-White-Morgenthau Plan for the economic destruction of Germany after the war. Professor Current examines the origins and nature of Stimson's lifelong program of setting the world straight by law or force in a brilliant chapter on "The Yale Man's Burden." Then, he begins the appalling story of the career of "Wrong-Horse Harry" in public life, mainly as it touches international affairs, by reference to his unsuccessful attempt to get President Taft to intervene in Mexico to put down a revolution. After assuming a prominent role in the propaganda leading the United States to intervene in the first World War, Stimson took a creditable personal part in the war as an artillery commander, although he saw to it that the rigors of war were tempered by ample sampling of the French cooking which he so relished. Under President Coolidge, he undertook the task of man-handling the radical forces in Nicaragua, an assignment which his predecessor, Lawrence Dennis, had declined to execute. As Secretary of State under President Hoover, he presided with great unction and fanfare over the signing of the greatest international fraud of our time, the Kellogg-Briand Pact to renounce war. Naively but disastrously, he took this fakery seriously enough to contend that it outlawed all aggression and made the aggressors "war criminals." This led to the famous Stimson policy of the non-recognition of nations whom Stimson regarded as "aggressors," and the use of sanctions to hold them in line, unless their defiance of sanctions made it necessary to restrain them by force. No other dogma or policy did as much to give a disastrous turn to American foreign policy and threaten the peace of the world. Fortunately, President Hoover's good judgment prevented Stimson from plunging the world into war with Japan in the early 1930's. This Stimson doctrine was also used as the basis of the prosecution of war criminals after the war, an ill-starred process which assured that no possible methods of brutal and destructive warfare will be withheld in the next war. Irked by Hoover's statesmanlike restraint, Stimson was determined to sell his bellicose program to Presidentelect Roosevelt. He had no problem in achieving this aspiration because one of his former assistants had been Felix Frankfurter, then the closest confidant of Mr. Roosevelt. Stimson saw Roosevelt at Hyde Park on January 9, 1933. Since Roosevelt's attitude toward Japan was very hostile and was based almost entirely on quasi-infantile prejudices against Japan and for China, Stimson had no difficulty in selling his "bill of goods" to Roosevelt, who followed the Stimson doctrine in regard to Japan without serious variations right down to the provocation of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Stimson aided the trend with almost frantic vigor all along the way by speeches, letters and articles in which he deplored Mr. Roosevelt's ostensible isolationist policies, urged the use of a strong Stimsonian hand in dealing with both European and Asiatic nations, initiated the plan for the peacetime draft, advocated giving unneutral aid to England, and the like. He was suitably rewarded by being made Secretary of War in June, 1940. From that point onward, the Stimson program became in more forthright fashion the policy of Roosevelt and Hull in dealing with both Germany and, especially, Japan. Stimson took a leading part in the diplomatic game designed to provoke the Japanese to make an attack on the United States, an attack which came at Pearl Harbor. He advocated the rejection of the conciliatory Japanese gestures and diplomatic proposals which would have preserved peace with no danger to American interests in the Far East, and his policy of using economic and financial pressure to strangle Japan was put into active operation within two weeks after he entered the War Department — a policy which Roosevelt had been toying with ever since he had his talk with Stimson in 1933 and had planned to launch as early as 1937. Stimson encouraged this aggressive diplomatic strategy which had as its aim enticing the Japanese to launch a surprise attack on the United States and thus facilitate our entry into the war, even confessing openly to this with a famous entrv in his Diary on November 25, 1941. Although he had available the decoded Japanese messages revealing the imminent attack on Pearl Harbor, he failed to order the warning of the American commanders there, and later went to discreditable extremes in the effort to obscure or cause the evidence exposing this serious delinquency to be considered false. Stimson was, however, personally impatient about waiting for the Page 49 inp I Febrt#
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