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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 046. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/885.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 046. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/885

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 046, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/885.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 046
Transcript OFFICIAL state censorship of movies as currently practiced by six states is distinctly opposed by Arthur De Bra, Director of Community Relations for the Motion Picture Association of America, and guest on a recent Facts Forum Panel program that considered the pro's and con's of the subject. Submitting motion pictures to the famous production code of his organization, however, is on a purely voluntary basis and proves to be a help both to the producers of pictures and to the movie- viewing public, according to Mr. De Bra's interpretation of the system. All of the regular panelists on the program agreed that state censorship is undesirable, but sharply disagreed as to the merits of the production code or any organized boycotts. These panelists included Professor Charles Hodges, former foreign correspondent and now professor of international politics at New York University; George Hamilton Combs, radio and TV commentator of note and former Democratic congressman from Missouri; and William Buckley. Jr., author of best-sellers and a nationally known lecturer. News analyst Hardy Burt served as moderator. INFLUENCE OF MOVIES USUALLY CONSTRUCTIVE "Do movies have any moral effects on their audiences?" was the first question projected, with the guest of the hour giving his views first. "I think that answer needs to be both positive and negative," stated Mr. De Bra. "Movies, by and large, over a period of time do have an effect on the morals of their audiences. But the proposal that any particular movie materially affects the moral thinking or the moral standards of an individual or many individuals is to me quite unthinkable." In ex- Page 44 plaining his views further, he stated that the aggregate influence of the movies is a very constructive one, although occasionally there is a movie that could be questioned as to its constructive moral influences. Mr. Buckley agreed that motion pictures usually do have a positive moral effect, and that there is a lot of uplift in many inspirational-type movies, but added that any lapse from a moral standard induced by a single movie is serious and certainly worth talking about. STRONG IMPACT FROM SINGLE PICTURE Turning to Mr. Combs, Mr. Burt asked the same question and got a very definite answer. "Of course they have an influence," he stated. "We are a part of everything we have seen and heard and read and done. To deny the impact of any single life experience is to deny reality itself." While agreeing with this, panelist Hodges also pointed out that movies not considered "moral" are not necessarily "immoral." As an example he mentioned a movie from several years back, "All Quiet on the Western Front." "It so happens I did a world-wide study of the effects of this single picture, with the alarm it produced in foreign governments wanting to militarize in the lace of deve'-opment of dictatorial approaches to aggression," he recalled. "It was a terrific preachment. A single picture can be a tremendous force." Mr. Hodges also recognized the problem of the difference between the movie which meets the needs of the mass audience, a typical American family seeking entertainment, and other types of movies. Many pictures are not suitable for mass dissemination, but rather are for adult or limited use. There are many movie houses which run popular pictures, not box office successes, which do not - ]||s(( anything justifying a Hollywood? , duction. Yet they are splendid, art*! q and honest presentations ol i""tl Prod in Mr. Hodges' estimation. j De Turning to another ease in Pv is on moderator Burt referred to a "' liax< movie, "I Am A Camera,'' whi''1.' nu-,, not meet the moral standards °" outsi production code, and asked the 8 pi, (, panelist his opinion as to wli,"1' proc should be shown in the general'"' houses throughout the United ' I "Tell me," he said, "why did the? duction code of the Motion \»1 Association reject this Par?J movie, and what is the prod1* code exactly?" "Well, l'should like to beg1" pointing out to you," stated \ ^ Bra, "that while any producer >sj come to submit his picture to tn I duction code, there is nothing c" I si.ry about it. There are many produced here and abroad that*. tributed without ever coming 1 the purview, so to speak, ol ' f duction code and its adminisrl The code was composed larg0'-J the Ten Commandments and I'1 j ters of criticism that came to ll 1 all over the world through the I . . . We kept a record of vvbW complained about. PRODUCTION CODE ^«j REGULATES SELF | «w ol "To give you a concrete ill'' .^, most people would complain " j until De Bra continued, "when W*J of th, have a hanging of a man froin ,jj nig t, of a tree as you would set" ,| out ( close-up on the camera, swing1 ^ «rst and forth. So one day an in'*,: *tudi camera man down in Mexico ' ■ »' s tary court was caught by the£1 J"sist in the sharp shadow on a w all-',,,■ ^'e ] . ..harp sti in<g was to take place, and he , his camera on the shadow <"' Facts Forum News, FebnA the- Faci
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