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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 044. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/883.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 044. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/883

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 044, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/883.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 044
Transcript (Continued) ORGAN TR Against OTC ment tried it before, i.e., from 1945 to 19.50. and failed. It tried at that time to take this country into the International Trade Organization, The attempt failed in 1950 when the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, after a public hearing, refused to report the ratifying resolution out of Committee. The ITO died as a result. BEWARE OF CAMOUFLAGE Now, having learned a lesson, the State Department, with no change in final objective, has hit upon an approach that appears completely innocent. The protective and deceptive coloration is almost perfect. The ITO proposal, though clumsy and intricate and unwieldy, was at least honest. It was designed as an instrument of world economic planning, and it went down to ignominious defeat because the Congress would have nothing of it. Now, like the Disney fox. it is back in an innocent-looking and even attractive garb. The OTC looks innocent, indeed. It has no powers! No powers at all! Except to call international conferences; how innocent! But please note, such conferences would hate power. In such a conclave the General Agreement could be amended by the Assembly in any manner agreed upon. The International Trade Organization Charter, deleated in Congress, could itself be resurrected and Congress would not have another shot at it. Yes, say the proponents, but Congress could still assert its supremacy. Well, 1 will leave the morality and integrity of it to you. Congress could, of course, in the extremities kick over the traces, precipitate ill will among the Western nations and generally act irresponsibly and willfully obstreperous as a means of reasserting its power. The question is not only is the OTC proposal constitutional, but is it wise and would it promote good international practice? Would it be sound policy to put Congress into a position in which it cannot legislate as it might wish to, without violating an international agreement? How, in other words, can the " Department properly make an >£' national agreement that binds gress against exercising its legis1 authority? Yet that is precisely has been done in the General rfi ment on Tariffs and Trade! approval of the OTC would l* approval of the General Agreeine", which the State Department! agreed that certain tariff rates w'i", be changed by legislation, ano^i there will be no import quotas lished or maintained. These are all methods of regu1 commerce and that power lies Congress. Obviously the State Depa) cannot in fact thus bind CongresSj it can agree with other countries Congress will not act and thus P Congress in the position of acting , at the expense of dishonoring United States! This means th''1 State Department has put a roadj across the legislative path of Co*j equal in weight to the hone' " country. What kind of maneuvering , that permits one branch of th6' (Continuedon Topol v'('' negi also cone red,, cone reeir any , yrgan ""/<o.s- "<ili(n, r'l>eal, Tl For OTC can often be surmounted by quality or style factors, by reducing costs or effecting other economies. With quotas this is not possible. For many years U. S, export trade lias suffered greatly from such restrictions imposed by other countries and a major aim of U. S. commercial policy has been to outlaw their use as protective devices. The achievement, therefore, of an agreement among all the major trading nations of the world not to use such restrictive devices lor that purpose is a victory of the first magnitude for the principles of foreign trade policy which tlie United States has itself followed and long urged on the rest of the world. There are certain exceptions to this general prohibition against quantitative restrictions that are rigorously defined in the General Agreement. The exceptions cover, in general, three situations: (1) to protect the foreign exchange position of countries in balance of payments difficulties; (2) to promote tlie industrial development of economically underdeveloped Page 42 countries; (3) to limit the imports of agricultural products into countries which have domestic price-support schemes and production controls for these products. (The U, S. has been granted a waiver permitting import quotas required by Section 22 of the Agricultural Adjustment Act. even in those eases where production controls are not used.) All countries entitled to maintain quotas by virtue of these provisions must consult periodically with the organization, provide justification for their continued use, and indicate steps taken lor their ultimate elimination. Part II also contains provisions permitting any country to take steps necessary to protect its national security, public morals, health and similar matters. Finally, the General Agreement also contains the so-called "escape clause." Under this clause a country max modify or withdraw a specific concession if. as a result of unforeseen circumstances, imports of the particular article concerned have caused or threaten to cause serious injurs to one of its own industries. This clause is essentially the same as the escape clause the U. S. has included in all its ^ 'tis . "ihl't 1 1 Playec trade agreements since W*1^ 0t which has been part of the I of th ' Agreements Act since 1951. j than a Hart I The Organizahfj yea 'it"' ■■>■■ estaDlislies tlie Organization »'■ f "tent Cooperation to administer t'1' . l>ri\, era! Agreement and to pel''"' '" 1m , Trade Cooperation — deals «" j 25 pe cedural matters and with othe'l these ■ tions relevant to the Agreerne^f Trie whole. Article XXV. now' <y G\TT establishes the Organization h* ( "lent en lev following additional functions1 J'l'Oin (,i) tn facilitate intt ryovei iimeilt''1 J ?'leb ; tations on questions relating "' *v0rld ti,>nal trade; (b) tn sponsor international tra»'' trade Hons; ,„.J to ,.,, (c) to sl,„l> ■ questions nf interna"'| i. ' Ci ami en,n,Hernial policy '",'nil''. ■'' '' ' appropriate, make rconn""' "Oils. thereon; , , u^resqlte (d) to collect, anah/.c and pnh''Sj-fj VVorhl tion ami statislieal ilat.i 'r'-' jjf.of tern.,lion.,I trade and cninn" a'. ',,, , "' due regard hciim paid 1». ,JiUiv tics in bodies this lield of other '"' AKreei "The Organization shall authority to amend the />''"' the General Agreement; »"' or other action of the As**l " I he Assembly consists of all tn jF.vr-r inH parties of GAT] \, (Continued <"> ' I'm is I'm,, xi News, Feb'1'
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