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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
File 037
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 037. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/876.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 037. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/876

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 037, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/876.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 037
Transcript cs, biology/ melor's Def arts in su* ime time, <* school "I ' ertifieation] tate. In <£ ;h to e. ind th. ge for an <* jrder to aofl students who love learning and who |ve might suppose, would be eminently suited to teach others, turn away rrom the college of education and enter other fields. Even if the salaries <>' teachers were increased, the intelligent student would hesitate to forfeit '»s opportunity to take content courses 'Or the dubious education he would receive in the teacher training program. The choice between content courses and the theoretical blanks i0» ottered by the educators, between an of the nui fori stu* jquirec iat the academic dec lcation co' major veil. in TEACHER egree and an education gree, is no real choice to the student who wishes to spend his college money and time in gaining knowledge. In choosing to enter the college ! . education or even in choosing to ake a number of education courses le must deny himself the opportunity I? .Jearn content and thereby both stu^ !mit ,'le st'<>pc of his education and r'„„ait J,'">' himself the chance of obtaining "<' knowledge which will enable him ro he a well-prepared teacher. N''1' that a and imp1 best serve-, . of educj nk, his d<*J be a rf would Wl vhere w'ltWJI ,'isitv, we s."j "ln'ty to increase his store of khowl 'it of kno«" j , "'f.u ''il,. ,'n college, but also he may jeet matte'• irteit his chance to pursue knowl- nn more th* uSe professionally in the future. As regard % ', eat'her he will be required to sup- anehes of ^ j,'''1'"."1 his training from time to time to a prosP, iv "'king courses in summer school. icss in l'f j tion ""^ in the educational ccrtifica- his cl rcher to '■f„TVl courses diminis LACK OF CONTENT COURSES coll °nly does the student in the t*f, ,e8e of education forfeit his oppor- S". tiiinty te -'- ■ • - • ' ,vl* edge'wh whose m ere we shollj ,.,, ' "•'""' Ins chances of pursuing foment courses diminish. If he wishes .iif) inee profession; or even to it us as a qualified do so largely within ittrni'C"",^" his st hi of lf'ir"J| teacher u ,,...,! sen0 \t tlir i must mi m) itixgciy wium to K to T , ol of education. A trip to Italy eholastic^mediev'Vnhi;'m V'"""'' ' "*?" A ^^ «=vaj philosophy, a course in ad rood SC'hOrjtl "Pect to^to study Roman culture, a course in ... , »■- i"", a course in ^i.-rnoOl'Tn'rof matl|e"iatics will do him less c disappejprotes.sional „(1(l(] f| L' mod <pr.il lOf i„ , expectant ,n Wm] ier-pupi] lan a "workshop" relationships or a „„tl^ Se,.," f'l'ii I ei.UIOIISIIIOS Ol il n'y °P1 > o l"i"' ", eu'riculum planning at the 111 r1', ,1" ,' Wl' A* t<» earning a graduate st studentsjcUgreo in all .„ f„s„.uSL. n,„ re often ^Professional co i„eliiiatio»J»tci)mplishmer ?e the who caimO1^ Thlls> tl ic average J to educaOl alleges <*j mpensation for such an ment is almost nonexistent. "' very students who would brad m,°st competent teachers are ' <(l «"h .. difficult choice. If tin' Corn-. "'""-iiH ciiuilc. 11 men n,..";''" "■!'"' learning is primary, they th',',, t ,- Ult a e'l'ee. as a teacher in 1 "f>llt schools will not oiler the pre-h'« '" «.. lege ' ''"' UnldC iuV11'! Stlu'ent "ho is less interest. •ducation- ^ educational methodologv than the low ^ffi,.S,;|^t '"after, rath- ' 'stl.;af^sN.<Th",'t,J.,'i,,>' t0 Pursue"thefr inter 's when •' l|Mll(| ig currici'ifSniu| than enter >v the ''<' i,, /"-''cr training program, may ner .os< to satisfv his desire to know to teach hv following another "e'""S ''""^meei'l"^''' ,"""''' "> *"'""'« 1,n ^ found a si^j,.],, J :;e;.dem,e degree in his special he ina\ become quali- on the college level, mastery • , interest hei-'^lVhe'e'aJ-h'!! ,1 the Wfl ■hi jeldol present time. mav k.."^,,, ;g-«1^ tfA«s FonoM News, Februaru> l956 us. /•'■■■ of subject matter rather than educational theory still determines one's competence to teach. If, however, he determines to bypass the education courses and gains a liberal arts degree, hoping to teach in the public schools without satisfying the certification requirements, he will find it difficult to secure a position; for no matter what his abilities and accomplishments, no matter how broad his education, he will not be able to qualify in regard to the teacher training requirements. At best he can hope for a temporaiy certificate. The situation which has brought about the decline of instructional quality in public education is not, as is commonly supposed, mass education. It is possible to equip sufficient numbers of persons with the knowledge necessary to instruct young people. If it is possible for the present number of college students to profit at all from higher education, it is also possible to secure teachers who are adequately trained in the fundamentals of mathematics, grammar, history, literature, and science. But we shall not secure teachers who are concerned with teaching until we find a means of reinstating in the colleges of education the regard for learning, for fundamentals, and for the discipline of the mind and the formation of character through mastery of simple facts. Unless the importance of content courses in the training of teachers becomes recognized by those whose business it is to secure and train teachers, and until educators in charge of certification re-adopt the examination method of determining competence to teach which they have abandoned, nothing — not even a substantial increase in teachers' salaries — can raise the quality of instruction in the public schools. PUBLIC SUPPORT NEEDED It is necessary, however, to understand the difficulties involved in any attempt to reorganize and re-evaluate the teacher training and certification programs. First of all, since certification is a state function which is under the authority of an elected official, usually the state superintendent of public instruction, any change in certification policy must, of necessity, come from the public as it makes its concern known to its elected officials. Second, certification requirements, once adopted, are incorporated into the state education code and thus acquire legal status. Finally, at the present time state educational affairs are controlled by a select group of persons, some of whom are professors of education at the state universities, and some of whom are state officials, em ployees, and appointees. This group is especially close-knit, since by training its own principals, administrators and supervisors, the educators are able to perpetuate their policies. For this reason those who control educational policy by recommending and approving certification requirements enjoy an almost unlimited authority and a nearly unshakeable security. It would seem then, that if we are to combat the anti-intellectual trend in public education, public support will have to be enlisted. Without public backing, intellectuals in the liberal arts and in the sciences, though they are well aware of the de-emphasis of learning which has taken place under their noses, cannot hope to revise the criteria for teacher certification, nor can they bring about a change in the prevailing philosophy which governs the teacher training programs. end Management Listens (Continued from Page 15) twentieth century form of free enterprise which is little understood by much of the world. The United States is, above all else, a business nation and business has become its way of life. The primary function of business, and therefore of capitalism, is to provide goods and services needed by human beings at prices they can pay. Profits are essential to keep the wheels turning, but business will neither get profits nor deserve them unless it performs this basic function, and performs it well. At the beginning there were only two people to talk — the man with the idea and the man with the money. Today everyone is "in on the act" — millions of "junior capitalists," today's great army of stockholders, now take their places. Today, instead of one man with an idea, there are numbers of executives with their specialized functions. And when, as so often happens, the stockholder is also a customer, a dealer, a worker, a manager, or a fellow-citizen of your town, he can talk with authority and command respect for his business views. What is more, management listens — for this is the voice in control today. end Manuscripts submitted to Facta Forum \eics should be accompanied by addressed envelope* and return postage. Publisher assumes no responsibility fin- return of unsolicited manuscripts. Page 35 V II- ing k
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