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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 036. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/875.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 036. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/875

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 036, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/875.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 036
Transcript when education is "spread thin" view with alarm the growing school population. "Can we," they ask, "hope to provide education for all without sacrificing the quality of education which we desire?" Certainly, semi-literacy for all the people is not much better than adequate education for a few in a nation which has come to believe that the opinion of the majority is the ultimate authority. The pressing problem, then, if universal education is to be the source of strength which we once believed it to be instead of a source of weakness in our culture, is to determine a means of retaining a high quality of instruction within the framework of universal education. Thus, we are concerned not only with securing enough teachers to meet the increasing demand, but we are concerned also with securing the best teachers to be had, lest we solve the teacher shortage by filling the schools with mere baby sitters. Those who, feeling that the present quality of public school education is inadequate, seek the causes of this inadequacy are frequently told that the level of instruction which they deplore is the result of the present inadequate salary scale in the teaching profession. Unless and until, they are told, teachers are compensated in a manner befitting their training and responsibilities, a high quality of instruction will not be secured. Although it is certainly true that teachers are disgracefully underpaid in most states, it must be admitted that teachers' salaries have increased considerably in the past fifteen years. Despite this increase, however, the standard of instruction has not improved, but has, on the contrary, degenerated considerably. It is my belief that salary alone is not the main determinant of instructional quality, and furthermore that there is another cause, less easily remedied but more important, for the present quality of instruction in our public schools — a cause which can be traced to those whose responsibility is the training of teachers. THE PSYCHIC REWARD When one enumerates the inducements of any profession he must include, in addition to salary and working conditions, another factor which may be called the psychic reward. To the doctor this reward is the satisfaction gained from healing the sick and that of using his special skill to make a better world. The attainment of this satisfaction, though it may be a source of monev, is not dependent upon remuneration for its existence. The man who enters the medical profession may expect to eam a more than adequate living; he may expect to work Page 34 long and irregular hours; but his decision to practice medicine is not dependent only upon these considerations — the psychic reward is equal in weight to these. To the teacher the psychic reward which, in addition to and in spite of the physical considerations of the teaching profession, determines his decision to teach is his love of learning, his concern with knowledge, and his desire to disseminate it so that he likewise may contribute to the making of a better world. The fact that this inducement, this psychic reward, has all but disappeared from the teaching profession is, I believe, the real and serious cause of the present poor quality of instruction in our public schools. One effect of the absence of this most important inducement in the teaching profession is the barring of what max- be considered a significant number of suitable and qualified persons from the ranks of public school teachers. A look at our present method of training and securing teachers will, I believe, show why the teaching profession has barred this group, why the profession does not attract the best potential teachers, and why, as a result, teaching quality is suffering. CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS In order to become qualified as a teacher in the public schools it is necessary not onlv to earn a university degree, but also to secure a valid teaching certificate. Although this requirement is waived when it is impossible to secure licensed teachers, such a teacher is in most cases issued a temporary permit to teach which may be renewed annually only if the teacher agrees to attempt to meet the standards for certification. The practice of licensing teachers, a relatively recent one, was adopted as a means of strengthening the qualifications of teachers and of distinguishing between career teachers and those who taught only as a means of sustaining themselves until they could secure other positions. In theory the standardization of teaching qualifications is undoubtedly desirable. But the situation which has resulted from the certification of teachers is, in fact, because of the nature of the criteria for certification, defeating its original purpose of raising and maintaining a high quality of teaching. In most states the securing of a valid teaching certificate requires that the prospective teacher receive special training in the field of education. In some state universities it is possible for an undergraduate to satisfy the certification requirements as he completes his general college courses; that is, a student may major in history, art. literature, music, physics, biology, mathematics, earn a Bachelor's DeT in the college of liberal arts in sud subject, and, at the same time, •• enough courses in the school of ** cation to fulfill the certification [ quirements in that state. In cases students who wish to earn ' the academic degree and the cate must attend college for an ' quarter or semester in order to al plish this dual purpose; in other' it is necessary, because of the nua of education courses required f<,r. tification, not only that the s"1* take the required education cox^i but that he declare a major inL school of education as well. BEST POTENTIAL TEACHERS LOST One would expect that a interest in learning and imp] learning would be best entering the school of eduwj There, we should think, his prepare himself to be a \r, ca]iable of teaching would h tA "ot filled. There, if anywhere with'" coll,.,,, confines of the university, we s "nity V e,i,,,- ge v expect that the pursuit of km'" the mastery of subject matter torfeit who needs information more tt^ ' Se | teacher?), and the regard «* 'l/<-ac] knowledge of all branches of "* U'mei life,! ;;"t oi study would appeal to a proj! scholar whose business in h'<'li shod tak profess to know. There we pect the student teacher to fellowship of persons whose m tion fii"1 l"nt<-,, sin1 '" adv " n'nta iei cern is the acquisition of learn'l>J tpi the fostering of good scho$ ^ ^ There we should expect to "vj to st studious, there the scholastic cr the university. pedie. „;/.Vi"ieeu But we would be disapp0.1'^ profj^ every one of these cxpecta"0 it, ((i^ the truth is the very oppos', jScinj,,'., dents who major in educa" jjloca] |( from being the best student jdegri,t, university, are more often ' jPmfess those with the least inclination jaco t/p" 1 ac, if . -«■— - —.> — -<>mi learning. Students who cann" j ThUs tain a high scholastic average ibe t|ie quently shuttled into educati" taeo,] v the more rigorous colleges ol .-Co"cen versity. From the fields of en^g'ay f,., pie-medicine and pre-law "%fi"' P"l the liberal arts college, stndi'V"' op, are unable to make the gradi" ^K Tl vised to major in education. ,-i- '" < The reason for the low ''»' subj students attracted by the '",^1 ,',„/'' education is obvious when ("!'.|miK|"S< the teacher training clinic1''1 where amid the numerous ings is there to be Found eo'4""1 I'" tent course. Instead the t01l^j!ifte-ct I devote himself to the piobl1'"1,^!,,,,.,," to teach. That he may kno".^ to teach is not considered rC JiPacts 1 It is small wonder, then- Facts Fobum News, .>/»"'
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