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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
File 035
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 035. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 14, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/874.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 035. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/874

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 035, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 14, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/874.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 035
Transcript The — Snoiihallvdl •hfraining v the <*u ,ec'ucati°n for democracy," indents traits and ideals wl , l«tecttve cit cb«t>cally Sh al^Pularity an attempt to develop in ing, tne "-*„ '"'" lra'ts and ideals which prepare them to be bear little j~ ?ctlye citizens. Although this function has been enthusi- av '" wlliCrfbo l ■ shouldered by educators, it owes much of its nmon in "X,^1 afrit>' in educational circles to a willingness on the rational te^ ,. °' many parents to relinquish to the school their r and a lo^t"t,°nal responsibility and authority in regard to the eern is n0j VeloPment of character and the exercise of discipline. insmit it-n' desire t(1 ii "METHOD WITHOUT CONTENT" ATION It ls quite evident that vocational training, the utili- ui l°tl °^ Va"C' Principles °f fbe psychology of learning, icr of f<,rCj*ssa fos'e™g of desirable traits of character are nec- .ifi('i,„_ry anc' important considerations of education. But in theory es are diifi' anv 'ases the tendency has been to over-emphasize these tl/°"s'u''>ations at the expense of learning. To consider ent time- "T'jhot,^"11' "'"cation as the only education; to use psy- 1 at least _-y0cati il r|oyr08y „as a convenient authority diffused ur. as a convenient authority for removing content ucators ll,Jetw6S tne curriculum; to overlook the relationship This tl>11 I t\CCn ''" c'eve'°Pment of character and the cultivation " for6 m}n^ through the discipline of mastering factual K Kma!mn; in short, to seek to obtain the fruits of learn- y discarding the facts and ideas which arc its roots — ese polici, For life," inf< seen to I'1' j cement cf1 Th, eies amount to educational nihilism. d-down ff, 'is "spoil^l ators, p«ff/>n of truths ich * rf su'ts °f these trends in regard to the training of ' s has been to de-emphasize content courses in favor eoretical training in methods of creative teaching. But °TS cannot be taught to be inspiring; their inspira- psychic reaction which results from the apprehen- can only be stimulated in them by the *nSl Pri, ■ • —' v-"" ""iv ur. SLiniuitiiei.1 in infill ', :'g !cl^Sn,S,tl°n °f learninS- °nl>' those persons who d. deem iisele'*arii n -„. __, c esire to jte il -?-n so' am' on'y those who are learned possess ( ' "hty or the desire to educate others. ed modei' a haracter •" l^s Fobum News, February, 1956 n, FebtvM It is possible to equip teachers with information, and it is possible to instruct them in methods of presenting that information. It is not possible to ignite them with the enthusiasm which is the divine gift of the scholar. That must be left to God. The upshot of the attempt to teach teachers method without content is that nothing is taught. By neglecting learning, we fail to teach students the bare fundamentals, and we fail to train teachers. In its struggle to be free from the discipline of facts lies the indictment of modern education. That this error has occurred in an age in which the word "fact" has all but replaced the word "truth," that the anti-intellectual trend is the main force in education, the proper domain of intellectualism — these are ironies which portend great harm to our culture. TEACHERS OR BABY SITTERS? The principle of universal free public education to which we are dedicated poses a number of problems which require solution in the near future if we are to continue to adhere to it. Many of these problems are purely quantitative and are the result of our growing population. School buildings, furnishings, supplies, and services must certainly be available in sufficient quantities if education for all is to continue to be physically possible. These quantitative needs of public education are receiving at the present time wide publicity, and, since they can be expressed in numerical terms and supplied by financial means, they are relatively easy to deal with. Surpassing the physical problem of mass education, however, is the problem of maintaining a high quality of instruction in the face of increasing numbers to be served. Those who have felt that quality must of necessity suffer Page 33
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