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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
File 031
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 031. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/870.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 031. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/870

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 031, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/870.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 031
Transcript WIDE WORLD PHOTO i picture, ring range ot the rtJI I raining jcnuui. mu,b ■>■»• "-^ .--a--- -■- V". j^ "11" ■""» man the customary "bull's eye." The agents ore trained to shoot at vital spots. 5eated in the foreground are other agents awaiting their turn on the range. future special agents ot the FBI are practicing pistol shooting from a standing position in this '"ken on the firing range at the FBI Training School. Note that the targets are the shape ot ™ther than the customary "bull's eye " The agents ore trained to shoot at vital spots. 5eatec if FBI it if it activities- in its duty I le looks f»r' i the press* .. Pui.i.c";,! rves a mttl ■ media n'fy orcement " , , the pub1* nted men tion as ■ill. which1 inted. Af«*l ell for the! live to ecu" DURAGE N the p< ■lice paid-l thoi.s.in •cingol havin i start as tailing S»l' ond3.tf* ovcrnii.eiii' : has d# of compeW ■ive less 1"': skilled workers who average 4,500 dollars or salesmen and clerks who average 4,420 dollars per annum. In industrial areas, the average policeman would better his financial condition by working in a factory. That the nation's police are grossly underpaid is brought into even sharper focus when a policeman's starting salary of 'V25 dollars in one eastern city is compared with the entrance salary for i|s garbage collectors, which is 3,950 dollars a year. The answer is public education, directed at the individual needs of the immunity. This has been demonstrated in the uphill fight we have all experienced in the field of law en- torcement training. When the FBI Rational Academy was founded twenty years ago last Julv . . . police training was the exception rather than he rule. Last year alone, it was our Privilege to participate in 2,315 local, county and state police training sch?oIs throughout the United States which, for the most part, were being operated by graduates of the FBI Na- 2$u Acao^emy. who now number Public education and the development of a truly workable partnership etvyeen citizens and law enforcement re imperative necessities if police departments are to be kept free of the JjUang influence of venal politics. Jjvery honest Chief of Police knows hat corruption begets corruption. ■ ne of the most degenerative forces American life has been corruption m i?l,nlic office. Corrupt politicians isrtf f°r venal Poetical machines. It , the taxpaver and law-abiding citizen who suffers. Whenever we find machines of corruption, we also find an attitude of Pi'hhc indifference. We also find law enforcement shackled and inefficient ~we find crime running rampant, pA°rs Forum News, February, 1956 in When a lackadaisical attitude develops, when corrupt, venal politicians take over, the first agency of public service to suffer is the police. By the same token, the influence of efficient law enforcement officers can turn the tide, because essentially the soul and conscience of America are right. An unyielding stand for the right is infectious. It is the first step in molding public opinion. When a law enforcement bodv proves to the public that it is as much concerned with the establishment of innocence as it is with the establishment of guilt, it wins the support of decent citizens. The sooner everyone realizes that the police will work equally as hard to extricate an innocent person who is caught in a web of circumstances, the greater will be the public confidence and support of that law enforcement agency. Beyond that, the effects will be far-reaching. Prejudices which are born of incompetence and nurtured by the suspicion of duress thrive upon doubts skillfully extracted from the testimony of untrained police officers by unscrupulous lawyers. The very heart of law enforcement is at stake whenever an officer's testimony is shaken or contra- dieted in court. Events and situations brought on by conditions of our times necessitate a greater consciousness of the need for protecting the civil rights of all people. Not only must our actions in fact be proper, we must be able to establish in court, if need be, that they were proper. Every time the charge of duress, unethical conduct or third degree tactics is substantiated, all law enforcement get a "black eye." When mistakes are made, we ourselves should be the first to take corrective action. The sooner every practice smacking of oppresion is abolished, the quicker law enforce ment will win and hold the respect of the citizens it serves. There is another area where much remains to be done in the way of public education. There is a real need to make it impossible for the mouthpieces of the underworld to effect delays by quibbling over words and technicalities. The American people do not want their liberties chipped away through reckless and willful invasions by the police. Neither do they want criminal elements to corrupt constitutional safeguards to cover their depredations through technicalities. The matter of searches and seizures is one of the problems we encounter daily. The law is far from settled. The most unexpected and unusual sihia- tions can arise when action must be taken immediately without time to consult law books or the prosecuting attorney. It is grossly unfair for criminals to go free, after they have committed clear violations of the law, because of some unexpected technicality when law enIorcement acts in good faith upon the basis of its best judgment and training. Even the Justices of the Supreme Court have not been able to reach unanimous decisions as to what is right and proper in such cases. From October, 1941, to June of 1954, the Supreme Court has rendered opinions in twenty cases originating with police action involving searches and seizures. In not a single opinion could all of the Justices agree on the proper course of procedure which should have been taken. The burden of proof is becoming more and more difficult. There is an increasing reluctance on the part of many citizens to testify. This is understandable when witnesses are not protected in courts from vicious smears and when unethical lawyers go beyond the proper bounds of cross- examination. COMMUNISTS ADEPT AT SMEAR TACTICS The confidential informant has become an institution and is used as a means of establishing truth. The use of the confidential informant is as old as man. In fact the first recorded use of the confidential informant is found in the Old Testament. As an institution, the confidential informant is used not only by law enforcement, but in practically every walk of life, particularly by the press and our financial institutions. In recent years, there has been a determined campaign designed to deprive law enforcement of the use of the time-tested and valued confidential informant. This campaign of vituperation is part and parcel of Commu- Page 29 FebflA
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