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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
File 026
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 026. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/865.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 026. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/865

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 026, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/865.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 026
Transcript iterated and referred to ever since, contained the following ten postulates: 1. Labor unions should belong to their members, not the bosses. The positions of union officials should be elective. 2. There should be less talk and more hard cash. Honest money (sic!) for honest work. 3. The worker should be permitted to choose the type of work he prefers. 4. Overtime should be outlawed. 5. Peasants should be allowed to quit the kolkhozes (i.e., collectives ) if they so desire. 6. There should be a ceiling on the state's share of agricultural production. Farm contributions to the state should be equalized. 7. The government should work for the people, not the politicians. 8. Production should benefit the people, not the state. 9. Emphasis should once more be on the consumer. Small shops, owned and run by little people, should be revived, to serve the consumer. 10. The building industry should be mobilized for the benefit of the people, instead of the state officials. Some points of this so-called people's program, at first sight, may look impressive. Its cardinal and decisive error derives precisely from the inability of its collectivistic perpetrators to recognize the primacy of free enterprise. This program fails to go to the root of the matter. It does not attack state control as such. It merely proposes to mitigate and qualify. It is at its core plain socialism. Yet this is the sort of thing which, in the form of leaflets, is dropped from the trans- Curtain skies bv means of the "freedom balloons" which columnists like Drew Pearson have been vaunting for years. This program does not offer any decisive opposition to the tyranny of nationalization as such. There is but the indecisive and dull suggestion to reform the present Communist system, to abolish its excesses, to turn it into some form of Titoism or semi- communism or to return to the socialism of the bankrupt National Front. Instinctively, the Czechs and Slovaks who hear this so-called people's program reach for the knob and shut it off. Thev must shrug their shoulders at the oratorical antics of men who rant against talking but in their own turn offer little beyond empty talk. This "Program of the People's Opposition" is faulty and spurious because the concept of Radio Free Europe is Page 24 Rep. Charles J. Kef- sten IR., Wis.l (left) Chairman of the Congressional Committee on Communist Aggression and Committee member Rep. Michael A. Fei- ghan ID., Ohio, with West Berlin Lord Mayor Dr. Walter Schreiber (center) during 1954 study tour. WIDE WORLD PHOTO based on a capital error. Radio Free Europe basically maintains that the threat to the free world comes from Russia as an armed and aggressive power; it obfuscates the fundamental issue of the world-wide Communist conspiracy. In accordance with this leftist line, Radio Free Europe absolutely never refers to congressional investigations of subversives in the United States. Trans-Curtain listeners are completely unaware of the existence of such men as Jenner, Velde, Eastland, Walter, Dies, Reece, and Mundt. When the Kersten committee operated in Munich, in the summer of 1954, RFE referred to it; but the texts of testimonies were edited to suit the over-all soft-pedaling ol basic issues. Radio Free Europe acts as if it were set up to preserve the concept of state bureaucracy and paternalism by all available means. PETTY COMMUNISTS BLAMED FOR PARTY POLICY Radio Free Europe acts as the quack who peddles cure-alls for the most nauseating aspects of the Communist disease; it fails to tackle the roots of communism as such. Thus it makes much ado about the chicaneries and perversions of petty Communist officials, but it does not name the real culprits, the wire-pullers, the bosses who guide and encourage the brutalities of little village tyrants. Radio Free Europe refers by name to individual Stakhanovites. tractor- drivers, and prison-guards: it disregards the organizers of the hated Communist drives. It thus actually protects the pillars of the Communist society, the calculating masterminds who play on the weaknesses ol a confused citizenry and trap their helpless victims in a net of Communist demoralization and perversion. In "Messages to Those at Home," Radio Free Europe pillories the little informers who are known to wor* Almost withoutl herds .»(.' n, Ra< them and tl feasoi 'n th< conce of th, vakia, cause other Let to b There Yalta, ences. Alger did. I; "n h pledg, "W, 13, 1! Soviet ment the state police. .„„», ...«.— ception these little fellows are kt*J t|le j far and wide as stooges of the ^ tne s munist masters. Dossiers on '"} puppets do not add to the knowj about Communist evil-doers. ■ dossiers are largely based on clipPj from the press of Communist! trolled eastern Europe. The * agents of the Soviet police, the <J tors of the program of terrofi never mentioned. "Messages to Those at Home, February 29, 1952, at 7:45 p.m.,'" example, said: "Who is the mail Nitre? (A tin)- Slovak town — £*, Who is the master of whom the " police itself is in fear? It is Serf Klike. He is hated, dreaded | mighty. He causes the punishm*! Eoficemen who sometimes cart for their victims." Now, who is this monster. Sl Klike? Not any "master" by j S, violat "Su Perou Pm., paper uals v cratic But a takes have i Princi rernai Wved These derstc ferenc cause hut hi honor E means. He is but a well-know'1 sergeant of the uniformed police-. Again, on June 26, 1952, at *j p.m., "Messages to Those at r> . singled out a few Communist w'° "Comrades M. Pokorelska, H. J? kova, Kr. Bezakova and M- *j kova," the broadcast addressed! to these petty Communists, j herds and tractor-drivers, reljj in time the warnings of today. ^ row you may be brought to * for your misdeeds; but tomorrO* be too late for you." "Program for Civil and State• ants," on April 10, 1955, at S-f i importantly sounded off: "^etj your attention to a dangerous i"? er. The pensioner Miehalek, Street, Brno, persecutes begtfjj , chases them from homes and . Lands them over to the police. Jv own interest. Comrade MichaJ'J advise you to stop your dirty vV'?J tn °?s This sort of broadcasting, di"'1^ "'< in a lowered, almost comical t^je p. supposed to scare primitive Facts Fom'M News, Fcbrtiar1J'\ Nal gardi, betrai remai Perha chara, refug, 't ma again: tests ( Curta offere These 'ocati, Passei sons ■ assistt Th{ ter rj police
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