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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 022. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/861.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 022. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/861

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 022, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/861.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 022
Transcript U.S. LABOR EXTENDS SUPPORT TO CRUSADE American lahor plans to take a more active part than ever in the Crusade for Freedom, according to William W. Weiss, who has just been named Crusade liaison representative for the Congress of Industrial Organizations. Mr. Weiss, whose home is in Pittsburgh, is a member of the United Steelworkers of America. He will work in the Crusade's Washington ofbee with John A. DeChant, vice president of the Crusade, During; tin- Crusade overseas inspection trip of Radio Free Europe and Free Europe Press, the party was joined by Irving Brown, European representative of the American Federation of Labor, and Victor Reuther, director of international affairs for the CIO. Reprinted from Sews Letter, Crusade for Freedom, Nov. 28, 1955 for this information." Vaclav Uhlik, whose home-made tank crashed across the Iron Curtain from Czechoslovakia to West Germany, declared that Czechoslovaks listen "conscientiously to Radio Free Europe and believe its broadcasts like the Bible." Similar statements are made by hundreds of other individuals who cross the border. A former prisoner of Recsk prison camp in Hungary stated: "Hungarians see in Radio Free Europe the embodiment of an idea which is capable of defeating communism." A non-Communist Swedish student brought back the following message from Romanian friends at the Bucharest Youth Festival, "Go to Radio Free Europe and tell them how things are here, that we have not lost courage and that the hope for freedom still burns with us. Tell them we listen regularly to their broadcasts." (3) The regimes have devised many ways to discourage radio listen- ership — though tuning in on Western broadcasts is not officially a crime. Ill Hungarian communities, for example, the Communists have recruited "listening couples" with instructions to drop in on neighbors unexpectedly and report if they are listening to Western broadcasts - especial!) RFE. In some communities, family dogs were seized by local authorities (on the pretext of canine disease epidemics) because the dogs interfered with the spying of the "listening couples" by barking warnings of their arrival. When word of Crusade for Freedom's campaign to raise funds for the support of Radio Free Europe reached the people of Czechoslovakia. Radio Prague, in a violent attack against the Page 20 Crusade, threatened: "The crusaders of today run the risk of losing not only their hats, but also their heads." (4) Official Communist reports stress the danger of RFE to the regimes. One report, prepared by the Hungarian Minister of Defense, stated: "The most dangerous effect of Radio Free Europe is that it results not in organized resistance, which is easily detected and suppressed, but in atomized resistance which is more difficult to control. For example, a Radio Free Europe program recently compared the situation in Hungary to a former despotic era: the effect of broadcasts of this kind is that they create resistance among Hungarian soldiers to the Army's Russification program." Sometimes unofficial but equally authentic reports of this nature reach RFE. For example, a high official in the Polish Communist government, in a personal conversation in the West that he never dreamed would be repeated, said: "Radio Free Europe is accomplishing the work of the opposition in Poland. It is the mortal enemy of the regime, which would offer any amount of money if it could persuade them to abolish this radio station." Another Polish official revealed RFE's extensive "word-of-mouth" circulation by the following statement at a Department of Propaganda and Agitation meeting: "One radio set in each village is quite sufficient to poison the peasants' minds with (Western) calumnies and lies." Regime attacks on RFE increased in number and violence during 1954. In Czechoslovakia especially, regime propagandists quoted RFE broadcasts in substance and at length in order to assail them. It became clear that some of these anti-RFE campaigns were being conducted under Moscow's direct guidance, as indicated by the publication of hostile articles in olficral Soviet organs and hostile broadcasts from Moscow, setting the tone of subsequent regime campaigns. (5) A cardinal rule of psychological warfare is not to dignify or advertise hostile propaganda by replying to it. The Communist regimes (and Mos- cow as well) have consistently broj this rule in regard to Radio i'rei' rope. In doing so, they have bM RFE's best publicity agents. Di* the past year, the Czechoslovak gime in particular has gone beyond usual frantic invective against I" it now quotes programs, in subst* and in depth, then tries to refute & in an effort to minimize their imp Meanwhile, the anti-RFE vit' poured out by Communist radio* tions, newspapers, magazines' speechmakers continues. Here i,ri few typical lines broadcast over B* Prague: I "The United States, the arch-vij1 behind a vast conspiracy ag peace and socialism, has br<" havoc to innocent Koreans. Ir*j nese and countless colonial l1f0 who aspire to liberty. The trail Radio Free Europe, steeped r mud, serve that part of America criminals and gangsters are pro^f so much that nothing happens 1" even when they kill another Ve. What a difference when you listj! Radio Moscow broadcasts to C# Slovakia. From Moscow we hear' the Soviet people's work, leisuJl education. From Radio Free j?'1 we just hear the rattle of arms.' . The frequency of these atta* illustrated in statistics on all." ' Czechoslovak propagand from April through September' During this period. Radio Fre* rope was the subject of mor. direct attacks (not includin and rebroadcasts) as against ; tacks directed against othi broadcasters. More than 100 r« tacks alone by Czechoslovak s' At R with otid wee all c Re, Rei Re, Pre Ev, IN; Kl( Doi Tra »> In were heard in September cases, regime campaigns again*1 j are spearheaded by instruction5 Moscow. .j A few of the epithets h"f5 Radio Free Europe by tin "criminal rabble," "dirty warrfl* "jackals," "miserable riffraff) of the ether," "saboteurs, from the rubbish heap." "radio sion," and "yakkity-vakkers.' The Communists utilize ev#« of the printed and spoken 55C 65C 15,i 10,. Ha, s A F, Radio Free Europe Headquarters in Munich, Germany, nicknamed "Little Penta90"' Facts Foiujm News, FebtvA j
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