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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 020. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 14, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/859.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 020. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/859

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 020, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 14, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/859.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript Radio Free Europe and many of them are trying to "save up good will" as insurance against future liberation. Since Radio Free Europe wages a realistic campaign against communism, it makes use, accordingly, of every available weapon, including every type of true anti-Communist which a tight security system can identify. At no time do Radio Free Europe programs accept the theories or practices of communism, Marxism or socialism. But recognizing the realities of democratic development in the history of pre-Communist Eastern Europe (which was very different from America) Radio Free Europe utilizes exiles of all political faiths (except left and right extremists) in its all-out finht against communism. The programs are varied in form and content; there is something for men, women and children of all ages. interests, needs and classes. There is music, drama, variety, commentary, poetry, comedy, interviews, quiz and round table shows. Religious programs and services are broadcast to listeners of all faiths. Stress is laid on the native culture of the captive peoples — on their own music, literature and history which the Soviet rulers try to suppress in the interests of international communism. News is the staple product of Radio Free Europe, which daily builds its reputation for news speed, honesty and accuracy by regularly "scooping" the Communist stations. Listeners in the captive countries often hear important news about Soviet Russia and their own countries over Radio Free Europe before they hear it on Radio Moscow, Budapest, Warsaw or Prague. For instance, the first bulletin on Stalin's death, Beria's purge and Malenkov's resignation was broadcast by Radio Free Europe many hours before Communist stations carried the news. The international nature of the op- "We in Europe have seen results of its (Crusade tor Freedom) programs and we think they are doing a magnificent job, ". . . ihe Soviets spend more money Irving to jam programs, surh as the Crusade for Freedom, than the entire Free World spends in the field of propaganda. In other words, Ihe Soviets recognize what a potent weapon propaganda is. Here we are a rountry that sells soap in terms so attractive you ran almost taste it; yet we have trouble ill developing propaganda that will appeal to the mind. 1 am sure you all agree with me that the Crusade for Freedom should he supported. It is an enterprise that is going to take a long time to develop the necessary know-how, lint I am eer- taiu we can do it. 1 am soberly opli- mislie that we shall make good progress in this field." General Alfred M. (.ruenther Supreme Commander, Allied Powers Europe oration was summed up recently in a newspaper article by an American journalist who surveyed the New York and Munich headquarters: "Persons of fifteen or sixteen different nationalities work together at Radio Free Europe in perfect harmony for a common end. Nationalist animosities and historical boundary quarrels are forgotten in the common endeavor of creating a Free, united Europe. Americans have a right to be proud of the efficient, businesslike way in which Radio Free Europe is doing its cold war job ... a shining example ol what free American enterprise can accomplish in psychological warfare against the Reds."' A report by a famous American engineering company, which made a survey of Radio Free Europe's installations in Portugal, stated: "The whole undertaking has been accompli! and become a working reality in almost unbelievably short time. ^1 \VI quality and performance of the W* broae completed is first-class and the ft'™ ultim expended are probably below w progr would be considered normal. '•J mind: spirit of the organization transcejj tain? anything heretofore witnessetl. ^ It i whole group thrives under pressfl j ears t Through "saturation broadcasts "repeat programming" and other tj| ed techniques, Radio Free Europe" been able to keep ahead in the <* stant battle with enemy jammers- ". eral transmitters carry each R3}. Free Europe program simultanetfl on different wave lengths, enaW* listeners to seek the clearest \ocM on their dials. Furthermore, each P' gram is repeated up to four tin"", day, so if a listener misses part * program the first time or if he J* home, he can pick it up on a I't'Pf Impossible to jam out is Radio > Europe's nightly "saturation serij whereby all transmitters are l'1'"' simultaneously over different frefn eies to one country at a time. "S^l sounding" is a technical device x\ by Radio Free Europe's eiigin''1'! stall to test transmission conajl and permit the selection of bio.1*, ing channels that will dcliv('r , strongest and clearest signal *° , target areas. All of these and many other ftt — signal power plus multiple trail* ters plus flexible programming eies plus the application and dcvl ment of proved engineering pri'1''" — are Radio Free Europe's ai.sw'f' the Communists' frantic ell<"'' black out the truth from the W'1'* In April, 1954, a long-range paign uniting the spoken and JJ1 effec : ence tag ol Radit for th doni, rian r. pet i( Th« to th fare j it is it noinir Cold the 1 there! of all therm yet si tain - mate from In evalu; tivcin direct dicatj encin, the ci munis much correl self, a outsid analv, intern Thi Near the West German town of Cham, a few kilometers from the Czechoslovak Europe operates a mobile, medium wave transmitter with a 50,000 watt signal. Page 18 1 anu r J word was initiated by the Free 1'j1, manif, Committte to Czechoslovakia. |"1 planned to help create a "''l'''' Opposition" in Czechoslovakia - could effectively win cone the people, and in doing so nVj j- " the Communists and sow the s'' i eventual liberation. The leaflet operation, sponsoj! the Free Europe Press, was sWj coordinated with daily prografl Radio Free Europe, in a massrvej to give the Czechoslovak p>'">' facts, help and inspiration thejj to carry on the struggle again*! rulers. Similar operations wci"' quently launched to Poland. There has been ampl the combined written-anu word operation has been a s'S^J step in (he development ol weapon in the struggle t" J ■^■■■J man's dignity and freedom w'"^ curtain of Soviet darkness bl Facts Foiu'm Ni:ws, Febrin"-'\ HungaJ e evideJ
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