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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 014. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 14, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/853.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 014. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/853

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 014, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 14, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/853.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 014
Transcript PORTRAITS OF "ISMS" Abstract art offered the Communists a quick route to fame and fortune. It dispensed with the long training and talent demanded by traditional painting. A few daubs of paint on a canvas called "abstract art" could be boosted and pushed as great art. Many of the newly rich were eager to emulate an older generation of millionaire art patrons. Most of the great works of art of past centuries have been acquired by museums or fami- This is another of Bernard Rosenthal's work. These faceless pinheaded characters are supposed to represent "The American Family." It decorates the new Los Angeles police station and cost the city $10,000. Page 12 lies of great wealth. Therefore, it became tremendously chic to purchase works of unknown artists and to become a patron and defender of the "new culture." On the other hand, the average American under no such delusions derived no pleasure or inspiration from the new art forms. The spectator felt uneasy and bewildered looking at paintings that conveyed neither beauty nor sense. Nevertheless, like the Emperor's courtiers they were easily cowed into silence because they feared the ridicule which the so-called "critics" and defenders of the new "Isms" would heap upon them. This was not an American art movement. At practically all of these American exhibitions, even today, the names of the same leaders of European modern art appear over and over again — Salvador Dali, Max Ernst, Pablo Picasso, Miro, Paul Klee, Tanguy, Chagall, De Chirico, et al., et al. The wedge of confusion having been driven home, a new phase was started. William Z. Foster, veteran Communist leader, made this signi- cant admission in the New Masses in 1946: There must be a clear understanding tli.it ;irt is a weapon in the class struggle. Not only is art a weapon, but a very potent one as well. Moreover, rising revolutionary social classes instinctively realize the importance ol art as a social weapon and have always forged their own art and used it to challenge that of the existing ruling class. The Communists had started to organize and exploit artists in the early 1930's by setting up fronts along cultural lines. One of the most notorious was the John Reed Club, named in honor of an early American Communist, John Reed, who had died in Russia shortly after the Rolshevik seizure of power and had been buried with full Red honors in tho Kremlin wall. Also active in New York was the Artists Union. Organized in 1933 by unemployed artists working on Fed- oral Arts Projects, a part of the Federal Relief .Program, it was super-militant. On May 1st, the Communist holiday, it called upon all artists "to come out into the streets, to don chisel and brush, and march shoulder to shoulder with his fellow workers toward the future." SUBSIDIZED DAUBING These artists were primarily Interested in art as Communist and revolutionary propaganda. Federal and State art projects set up to alleviate unemployment and distress offered wonderful opportunities to got paid, with taxpayers' money, for daubing revolutionary propaganda on public- property walls. They violently resisted all controls, which they called "censorship." Lett: "Seated Woman," the work of Pablo J so. There's no doubt regarding the party ° blank ' tion of this artist, who once remarked: '' ; ^- ' Communist and my painting is Communist r wor| ,'f' in9" ' ments l Right: William Gropper was present in <* an international Communist conference oij , Kharkov, Russia, set up to bring America11 ! under Comintern control. Years later, Gropper's Communist-front record with sj* or more affiliations, he was commissioned the above mural for the New Interior Bui'1' Washington at an admitted fee of De $4,000 and $5,000. These founders and early rrrfl of the John Reed Clubs and \ Union can be found today as fa* and prominently displayed art! many museums throughout the U^ States. The names of these sail* ists appear over and over att^ sponsors or supporters of literal" ens of Communist fronts during past 20 years. William Cropper was one "'. founders of the John Reed ®* «>h, well as a founder of Artists WjLVspi 1947. According to Coiigrcssiii'111 fecon dero, "Artists Equity Associati0,1laek o practically all the notorious lie rf£ei ll( in the country." Cropper was P if in 1930 at an international Co"ff''| ' conference on art in Kharkov. ^ ". '. set up to bring American artists™1" fi Comintern control. The sabotage' <h< American art was the direct °"^> { of this conference. In a cable t" i.i cow in 1932 Gropper reported , }" Soviet masters the accomplish"1 American Communists in the s™ for world socialism: in a 111 I have held exhibitions of fa j^ drawings and paintings on the i^Ejttftv-fi ist war and the defense of th<; ^tmoiH" Union throughout the West ^° j , the United States like Berki-l*/™ Friincisen :inrl In* An(n>l/.t in C^l , Francisco and Los Angeles in and in galleries in New York < 'l'lP I present 1 am at work on a mora1 *jfr0nt ing to be exhibited in the N1,1(^*'ODr Modern Art, which thousands ol r*r 11 visit weekly and I shall register "^B~t^> test by exposing the war pint. ' i"od the Soviet Union in (his paint'"8'and j With Revolutionary Grecti'ifi5' iC(s , William Cropper. lj(1 Gropper's Communist-fron'Jibout with some 60 or more affil'aj A second only to that of Rock^Jheel with well over a hundred. ^ct«*dnii the gall to tell the Senate Jnan nent Subcommittee on hive5'' in 1953: Fu ' Facts Foiu-m News, Fcbrw ■
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