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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
File 012
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 012. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/851.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 012. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/851

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 012, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/851.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript nil I'iiIiu hni. . leade their claim eanee Vas Exprt 11,1111 Cerm until This painti v ision vas. 1 like s pecti ii Ge nigl By ESTHER JULIA P^' ' lik Visible in many of the works of "modern art" is the hand of the masters of communism. To appraise this type of art as Eggheadian is to lose sight of its true intent and purpose, and to ignore its deliberate perversion. world Tliev and ., Came Picto help,, Eussii IN THE STORY, "The Emperor's Clothes," by Hans Christian Anderson, the Emperor, stark naked, marches proudly down the street between rows of His people. The admiring crowds murmur their appreciation of his beautiful new robes, their soft coloring, and their magnificent texture. Two thieves pretending to be tailors had convinced the Emperor that they could weave for him the most beautiful robe in the whole world, but that the cloth could only be seen by wise and intelligent people. With huge sums of money obtained from the gullible and vain Emperor, they pretended to weave these beautiful new textures. So skillful had they been in convincing the palace retainers that failure to appreciate their handiwork would brand one as having no taste, that not a single courtier had dared raise his voice to protest against what was obviously a swindle. So, while the gullible Emperor marched down the street naked, the perpetrators of the hoax rolled on the palace floor in helpless laughter at the success of their scheme. If the beloved Danish weaver of children's fairy tales were alive today, he would be astonished to see that his delightful fable has been taken over literally by swindlers in the field of so-called "modern art." Here we find an identical parallel—the perpetrators of the hoax of "modern art" have generally convinced the gullible that failure to appreciate their new forms of art expression brands one as hopelessly unintelligent and behind the times. Page 10 In fact, the situation is almost identical in that blank canvas is actually exhibited as art! This may sound very funny, but the sickening story of decadence, perversion, and revolutionary purpose behind the introduction of modern art to America is far from humorous. So- called "modern art" had its origin in socially sick and decadent European art circles before the first World War. From them sprung Cubi»m, Dadaism, Futurism, Symbolism, Expressionism, etc. In the social ferment that was to produce communism, fascism, and nazism, there arose artists who plotted to use art as a means of power over the masses. Since its inception, "modern art" has been revolutionary, not in the sense of bringing new beauty and craftsmanship to the world, lint in the deliberate turning of the human mind from what is true, good, and beautiful to the contemplation and worship of ugliness, disordered visions of madness, "social protest," and the use of esoteric and occult symbols for reality. All over Europe the revolutionaries. the dabblers in the occult, and the demented overturned the traditional forms of beauty and art. They boldly proclaimed themselves the new elite of the world of art. They formed into tight little groups, issued manifestos, and tirelessly promoted their "new" art forms. In 1920 the Dadaists held their most spectacular exhibition under the direction of Max Ernst, the artist. The entrance to the exhibition, which was held in Munich, was through a public urinal. A young girl dressed hi J as if for her first Communion, '' obscene poems in a loud voice s ture of this earlv Dada exhibition's'- an aquarium full of blood-red "T^'> which were an alarm clock, il ^J,' ' hair, and an arm carved in y^,-'''.'' Visitors also were invited to 9 txe and chop at a large block 0> u, rrt , • ,,itt*Hi'oii fhe general impression fi"' this insane exhibit was to conv'i11 (' ordinary visitor that he, too. h;"'>,'"(S(' mad. Indeed, some of the visit'"'" nit tu'isin .indfor p ILeiiin ritish novelist, J^'J d it for a London" go mad in the sense ol anger. They seized the axe eeeded to chop down the vv I exhibition before the police llt\L The Dadaists were elated t1*^, proved their point that the t ~ ' 11 I j. r ,l,,trI':l"noi world was in a state of comp"-1 lr "ess. ,. ,x ,' The Dadaists were not a'°ne.AetiV( leashing perversion and inaclo ; l the world. In June of 1936 '"L. ]" realists held an exhibition in k«n,a 1 The noted Bri':- ley, reviewed He said in part The Surrealists stand for violeflj neurotic unreason. They are W valient. You catch a glimpse the f the deepening twilight barbarism that may s blot I sky until at last humanity 6n4 in another ltmi- ni^lil. . . . Prophetic words written "1 twenty years ago! Part and Pj those helping to bring on ' JL night" were the following ai'l^jr J.T. Baargeld. founder of <3m ists, who helped establish the nist party in the Rhineland. F w 19 font xi News, Febrvt .
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