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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 010. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/849.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 010. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/849

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 010, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/849.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript OF BREAD AND CIRCUSES ••■=.'-.-. were unwilling to face the fact, that government produces nothing; what it gives to one citizen, it must take away from another. In effect, they were calling upon government to do the job from winch they shrank; and they considered such action to have moral sanction because it had political sanction! We appear to have abandoned the view of our founding fathers that in the field of morality only God's presence makes a valid majority; instead we have substituted the doctrine of "the divine right of the popular majority." What is true in the field of water resources and power is equally true in other segments of our economy. We are demoralized by an indecent competition. Each one denounces government handouts and privileges for the other fellow — but maintains that his special privilege is for the "general welfare." The slogan of many of us seems to be, "beat the other fellow to the draw" — i.e., "draw out of the public treasury more than you put in, before someone else gets it." The result is inevitable — more and more power is being transferred from the individual and the states to the centralized government, frequently at the request of the states themselves! The governor of the state of Washington, in a recent address to the National Municipal League, expressed grave concern over the transfer of power which he said results from federal handouts, and which presages the ultimate destruction of the states. What has become of our vaunted sovereign states, our states' rights, and the fear of our founding fathers of an all-powerful centralized government which is neither cognizant of the local customs of the citizens of the states nor sympathetic with their hopes and aspirations? When states come to Washington with hat-in-hand as suppliants, they become, in effect, wards of the government. In return for a meager portion of their own wealth, they must relinquish a large measure' of their sovereignty. What should we do? We have the answer in that historic statement by George Mason and Thomas Jefferson, which was included in the Virginia Bill of Rights, and which was the foundation of our Declaration of Independence: "No free government, or the blessing of liberty, can he preserved to any people but by a firm adherence to justice, moderation, tem- Page 8 perance, frugality and virtue, and by frecjuent recurrence to fundamental principles." 1 am no prophet of inevitable doom. On the contrary, I am sounding an alarm that disaster lies ahead unless present danger signids are heeded. 1 firmly believe that the world is now on the threshold of what could be a great dynamic expansion of spiritual and material prosperity which would tax the world's moral and productive powers to meet humanity's needs. The world looks to America for moral leadership. But true moral leadership exists only when there is no gap between our stated aims and our specific actions. I believe that moral improvement must precede material improvement. Let us recall the admonition: "Seek ye first the Kingdom of God and His righteousness and all these things shall be added unto you." RETURN DECISIONS TO PEOPLE What specific steps should we take? I believe that neither I nor anyone else, no matter how exalted his position, can determine for 165 million people their day-to-day economic and social decisions concerning such matters as wages, prices, production, associations and others. So I propose that these decisions, and the problems connected therewith, he returned to the people themselves. This could be done in four steps, as follows: First — Let us stop this headlong rush IWOOD & UNDFIIWOOD The abundance of raw materials, fertility of soil, and temperate climate of the U. S., typified by this fruit grove, are not as important as the spirit of freedom in maintaining a position of world leadership. 5l m kit te, beater ever toward collectivism. Let there more special privileges lor efflj ers, employes, farmers, business! or any other group. This is the' iest step of all. We need oiib, frain from passing more social laws Second — Let us undertake at oA orderly demobilization of tnfl the existing powers of goverut by the progressive repeal of "l socialistic laws which we a) have. This will be a very uVfo beii step because every pressure vh a |( in the nation will fight to reta'ci inm subsidies, monopoly privileges \]j|] protection. But if freedom is 'jmig, n; all special privileges must go'Asm. I Third - Of the powers that reffl^ X,,, government, let us return as possible to the states, lor '" 1928 1 local level, the people will of.Sot ju to apply more critical scrutMBecau the acts of their government ■'- f» < an Fourth - Above all, let us resulv-nnmin never again will we yield to tWFair I duction of the government paj},'orm. who comes amongst us oFWon't "bread and circuses," paid fo'jsoeiali our own money, sovereign rights! ■n f°' , I lav dren These measures which I cOt^'leg to you will require hold action- "heir i who take up the gage of bat""311 al be the real pioneers of out a!-1' ' ,a'lii frontiersmen of the last halt lk,1"«i twentieth century. We are. i",[ffiCh .' a great moral crisis which NV . dp^i'!' mine the issue between Freed0. >(1), the individual or slavery to the,;1 Let us here recall the words ident Sam Houston in his m'" the First Congress oF the Rep^ Texas, May 1, 1837: "Those *f tend for liberty must be prep1 endure privation." At the close of the Const*1 b Convention. Benjamin Frank)1' dieted that the federal union ■ 'i ' only end in despotism, as oth^tjlaee have done before it. when the 'fSdiica shall become so corrupt as .'■' despotic government, being it'^nd ci of any other." f/n0re And the late David Starr J Th, former President of Stanford L*0''t o sity, reminded us of our duty' 'f'"1?'- words: "Does history ever rer*L ",1,s self? It always docs'if it is ^T Soc tory. If it does not, we are dc*™ with history but witli a nu'i'' ■ sion of incidents. Like causesV% am,, Mi choose to test them. . . IIoW '"ifr,,,,, like effects just as often as "• the republic endure? So \on$ jbir, i ideas of its founders rem,"1' nant." ' u ' Facts FonuM News, FebrW'm
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