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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 009. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/848.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 009. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/848

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 009, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/848.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript : B R E A AND CIRCUSES cal parties with respect to the intrusion of the state into the economic and social lives of the people differ only in degree and method. There is no discernible difference in fundamental principle. Prominent political figures of both parties pay lip-service 1 i l ppalt0 the-letter of our Declaration of In- i-i f'i .,„rW I dePendence and Constitution, while i f,J!„« iufthey violate the spirit. Many important and vocal elements among our People agree among themselves that "our Constitution is outmoded." They support the thesis of a prominent Swedish Socialist, Gunnar Myrdal, whose views have recently been dignified, undeservedly, by being cited by our Supreme Court, that, "The Constitution of the United States is impractical and unsuited to modern conditions" and that its adoption was "nearly a [plot against the common people." The proponents of an all-powerful Centralized government have erected a bureaucratic colossus which imposes upon our people controls, regimentation, punitive taxation, and subsidies to pressure groups, thus paralleling me 'organized mendicancy, subven- on, bureaucracy and centralization" 'Inch played so great a part in the ownfall of Rome! This result has — Ween accomplished: th?Jf 'rf-By tortured interpretations of the "general welfare" and "mm. irtlier inteli /hat Mom the light [estruction during the d wanting, j1 Christianity, ad wanting' ntt has been true values t only pcrvd ■its. So wh( hose true / have been it to try soil" "new." DEAL" ng sprang sal" — the id1 i's law of io 3, people for their nei| ol reasonin! o advocate ■hided that t| at commaM ly neighbor reed by the. and that, w4C Thou shaft W k merce" clauses of the Constitution; cases to W Second - By an ill-advised eonstitu- • mio«i nal amendment which confers ition is nw.-m upon Con r tQ CQnfi t , in many '"'^ —-— r elm t pnvate property without due ess of law; proc- support'froj c for strenMl back to c u^ | tionable jurisdiction motivated by 't&hjrd - By court decisions of ques- 'lrlvc'iniP^ P"li,tilal expediency and"rational- have imp ^ lzed by new ..s()dal doct].jne.„ have also *-#■» . — * ,f those be\iv*"["'"< -By abdication by the Con- S'ess of its independent authority ary religio^i • • poxver in favor of the ifusion. MaIl>Jb7„ ~^n rticulate cluj7''''' - By bribery of the sovereign ar most ifj s,tatt's into submission to federal •e favored thei| domination, tional life a$ power be JJ, THE EROSION OF LIBERTY '""t"'"1'),?' oV lThese measures have so eroded the lechuich be,,v„| ,1H, n.dividual that one w on to put pit ers ,f tlu. vict()rv „, the American ° '• s outr'"'1"!'"" Ilas >>"'» preserved! It ap- ! T JKT- tllUt "■'' lli,v<- n-i'i'tetl the orig- lal.sm and ^ nal „ltent of our foundi fat|u.,,s to n appeal Jet „p ., „OVe,,llm,,t „f narrowlv re- ii a part.u ^trieted powers, and substituted for it , r;l,''v,i'ti»1 "''"' (",l('«'Pt which demands that „| silent P'VTimipotcnt government should assume ■ we depaf tcononiie .allies? ThC'^iliii s well know* | the two maimers Font M \, „s :i;ws, Fcbri' ■ social and moral responsi- tics for a servile people! February, 1956 This brings to mind the warning given us by the great English scholar and statesman, Macaulay, in 1857. He said, "Either some Caesar or Napoleon will seize the reins of government with a strong hand; or your republic will be as fearfully plundered and laid waste by barbarians in the twentieth century as the Roman Empire was in the fifth; — with this difference, that the Huns and Vandals who ravaged the Roman Empire came from without, and that your Huns and Vandals will have been engendered within your own country by your own institutions." The concentration of power in the Executive Department has dangerously impaired that system of checks and balances which our founding fathers erected with such great care and devout faith to be the guardian of our liberties. Today, the power of the federal government penetrates into every nook and cranny of our lives, so that many of us have drifted into the easy habit of looking to government as an instrument of positive action to solve all ol our problems and to provide not only so-called "security" but even ease and comfort. We accept without protest the thesis that government should have the power to deprive certain citizens of the fruits of their labors, in order to benefit others who cannot, or will not, provide for their own needs, as those needs are determined by vote-seeking administrators. Every lover of liberty believes devoutly in voluntary gifts and charity. But he objects to the imposition of a "pseudo-charity" by government on unwilling givers. For he foresees these sure results of such action: First — The victim is deprived of what he produces, which destroys his incentive to produce — and his confidence in the two commandments — "Thou shalt not covet" and "Thou shalt not steal." Second — The one who receives unearned gifts is relieved of the need to produce which, likewise, destroys his incentive and leads him to depend for his sustenance on a paternal government which, in return, demands his vote as a prerequisite for aid. Third —As production inevitably declines, the coercive state must resort to force. With voluntary production destroyed, the powers-that-be seek a way to "whip up" production among the ever-increasing non-pro ducers and among those who, the authorities think, are insufficient producers. Even the original beneficiaries become the victims of the thing they helped contrive. The "carrot" of incentive is now discarded in favor of the "stick" of coercion. The planners who hoped that their over-all plans for salvation would be accepted voluntarily now see that, since success depends on acceptance of the plan, they must eliminate opposition. They resort to force; their very devotion to the noble ends they seek blinds them to the immorality of the means they employ. Fourth—Those who are endowed with the political power to make others conform to their wills inevitably develop a moral weakness. There are main instances in contemporary history of a benevolent ruler who, after an extended period of exercising political power, concludes that power and wisdom are the same thing and that, since he possesses power, he must also possess wisdom. He becomes converted to the seductive thesis that election to public office endows the official with both power and wisdom. At this point, he has great difficulty distinguishing between what is morally right and what is politically expedient. DIVINE RIGHT OF THE POPULAR MAJORITY I have mentioned the destructive effect on the moral fiber of the individual when he is deprived of his natural right to choose freely in economic and social matters and of his moral responsibility for the results of his choice. Also, we have noted the corrosive effect of government largesse on public and private morals. During the past two years, I have had an excellent opportunity to observe these effects in their practical applications. As Chairman of the Task Force on Water Resources and Power of the Hoover Commission, 1 received many w i it ten and oral .statements from elected officials, public administrators, legislators, private citizens and from beneficiaries ol government "economic and social uplift" projects in all parts of the country. The most discouraging feature of these communications was the apparent eagerness of a lame, or at least a vociferous, portion of our people to reach out for government benefits. They appeared not to know, or they Page 7
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