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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 008. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/847.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 008. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/847

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 008, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/847.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript (Continued) OF B R EA Ar alone, and if he tries to do it, the affront to his deep spiritual nature will not be wiped out by providing him with excitement and distractions! Rome is not an isolated example. There were other instances of the disintegration of a nation resulting from decay of the moral fiber of the people. The eminent historian, the late James H. Breasted, when asked whether he had discovered any similar cases in the ancient world, replied, "Yes, I have dug up at least a dozen." How can we profit from these lessons of history? Today, in our own country, we see many of the old spiritual and temporal values which once we cherished called into question. The Constitution is challenged both as to letter and spirit. The original idea of a government with narrowly limited powers has been discarded. Persona] liberty is being traded off for an unstable "security" based on politically motivated guarantees. The faith of our founding fathers in a government of equal justice for all has been undermined. We are returning to the old idea of government by special privilege against which they revolted. Every planned society, welfare state scheme comes down to this: dubious benefits for some of us at the expense of the rest of us. These things are being sold to us under the guise of an ephemeral and misnamed humanitar- iaiiism called the "general welfare." A LIBERTARIAN'S CREED Yet, we are not without weapons with which to fight this decay and to promote healthy growth. The greatest of these is a new concept of the worth of the individual person which developed in Europe over the centuries and is one of the richest fruits of Christianity. The idea came to America with the earliest settlers, who gave it a political interpretation. This stemmed from the belief of our founding fathers that there is a pattern laid down by God for man's conduct in society. It forms the basis of the modern libertarian's creed which I would summarize as follows; Firsf — Man's rights to life, liberty and livelihood come from God. They are inalienable. It is the function of government to make those rights secure. And when any form of government fails to serve this end, it is the right and duty of the people to alter or abolish it. Scroll,/ — The functions of government should be limited to doing for all, Page 6 that, and only that, which each one has a right to do for himself. Specifically, government should defend the lives, liberties and livelihoods of the nation's citizens, invoke a common justice and keep the records incidental thereto. Other than this, the people should be free to pursue their own interests provided such pursuit does not lead them to trespass on the rights of others. Human nature being weak, the stability of limited government can be assured only where political power is dispersed or fragmentized. Third — The natural roots of human liberty are founded in God's moral law, i.e., in religion. Cut off from these roots, liberty, standing alone, is too fragile a thing to survive very long in our kind of world. Fourth — The fruit of liberty is freedom of individual choice. Rut with this freedom there must go, hand in "The natural roots of human liberty are founded in God's moral law, i.e., in religion. Cut off from these roots, liberty, standing alone, is too fragile a thing to survive very long in our kind of world." hand, individual moral responsibility for the results of that choice. Freedom of choice requires a free- market economy where the value of goods is determined by the satisfactions they produce for willing traders in terms of other goods. There are many disturbing signs that we are moving away from these basic disciplines of our founding fathers. More than fifty years ago. the great historian of Rome, Theodore Mommsen, came to our country on a visit. At a reception in his honor, someone asked him. "Mr. Mommsen, what do you think of our countrv'.J" The great scholar replied, "With two thousand years of European experience before your eyes, you have repeated every one of Europe's mis- takes. I have no further interest s]i[| you." and v One wonders what Monii* ()njv would say today in the light o> no ' (j increasingly rapid destruction o' nient traditional values during the j fj<,llR' twenty-five years. ^th, Many of our people have been' , verted to the idea that liberty A been tried and found wanting, r[. many believe that Christianity] ', .' been tried and found wanting-' J. P do not know that what lias been "• "" wanting is not the true values <* 'j.'PP' erty and religion but onlv pervert lsri • worthless counterfeits. So when '™'s urge upon them those true vaj "des they shy away. They have been J j llPre before; so they want to try some" °" o which they think is new. . , A "NEW DEAL" 1'1"' From such thinking sprang "]L centr; eept of the "New Deal" — the ide*a bun by substituting man's law of fot"upon God's law of love, people e-jltion, made to "do good" for their nci'-to p., By a curious line of reasoniw.the ", humanitarians who advocate tion, \ measures have concluded that ''"S'hich ond of the two great coniin.uid,ll'dowii| "Thou shalt love thy neighbor *bee„ self," can be enforced by the 'First - power of the state and that, wW* the happens, the first, "Thou shall 1° Ulrr Lord thv God," ceases to ll-'v'S,,,,,, significance. , tion Our current position is niao*!. upo precarious because, in many ins" „r;v we fail to receive support frt,nl ess to whom we look for st"'"' tf/,,.; urge people to go back to chu^i " there they frequently find tnj very forces which have imp.1'1',' j ' traditional beliefs have also "„- the very source of those bel"-'1*'""''' church itself! . """, The contemporary religion8 3 ''.'"' is in a state of confusion. Man'Li?. 'U prominent and articulate chu!V ''"' and some of our most i"\ shit church bodies have favored th«j) don izatjon of our national life "'j urged that more power be P on poli the hands of government. OI"e^ The sought to make the churches "^iberh a political force to put pr''sS<l,.rs • legislators. In short, those f.flcvoli we should look to guide us '"'.peais morass of materialism and s rial ;, posed humanism appear '.jet ,,,, "made a deal" for a partne^vtriete tween God and Caesar, "' . 1|(,^ playing the role of silent part\jniiiip, I low far have we dcpad^tc,,no] our traditional values? Thf jpilitj,., mystery here. It is well know*1 i basic policies of the two m»i° ?a< i s Facts Forum News, Febrii"\
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