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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 007. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/846.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 007. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/846

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 007, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/846.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript B R E A AND CIRCUSES produced, •ightfully l*fi ported almost half the population; lind brutal gladiatorial combats to filmed by the pertain and distract, all combined to ide them or form a setting for moral decav of the ic may steal' people. ,er\ cannot f prom g6 A D to 180 A D there only deprive lvas a perj0(J 0f 54 years during which live remarkable men occupied the ■throne ol Home in succession. The last SOCIAL CAN°ol these was Marcus Aurelius, one ol _ the best men who ever wielded politi- aid down the |al power. If a social cancer can be his bread r» lured from the top down merely by kit, unfortunj butting good men into public office, :ople who iA listory would surely record it in this •ove on the Instance. For if ever rulers were able ings. So, thejand unselfishly devoted, these men a man-made V, ere. ijut t|u,y faiiet] are smart el* . A philosopher and student of his- vou can <-';" f°r>-, Albert [ay Nock, has observed of the otne'ol this period, "They clearly foresaw the upshot of organized mendicancy he smart l«hand subvention, of the growing power jf acquiring f bureaucracy, of the growing ten- ithout worKiO lency tQ centralization. They did the [uest and *9 lest they could to cheek these malig- ered. At the |ant growths, but could do nothing, to another e*j • • The emperors of the second cen- ; reins of g° ury remind one of nothing so much of a rulinS^s an array of the world's best physi- ed their p°*Jans striving to reclaim a hopeless ncer patient . . . The tiling could not se lli",eJ»e done. . . The cancer . . . had so far appease • ■■- ,: -- -"<,,v. . . me uaueer . . . nau so lar ortable by l 'Veakened its host that at the death of lers resorted, W areas Aurelius there was simply not legislation, enough producing power left to pay 'welfare !>**' he |,i|ls. Under the exactions of the ruining <>1 "I J0'' holders, nobody could do any lieh returneol lusiness, fields went unfilled and even , thus W» pe army had to be recruited among ;lisrepute; * foreigners. . . Eighty years of eontin- governtneiit Jous effort by five of the world's best 1 of clear-c"1 md ablest rulers could not prevent at dole wh>c hv Roman populace from degenerat- n'-i into the very scum of the earth, worthless, vicious, contemptible, sheer lunian sculch." 1 PROSPERITY - BY GOVERNMENT SUBVENTION There are no precise records which Pscribe the feelings of those for '""" the poet Juvenal felt such torn. But using the clues we have. ■tkI judging by our own experience. e can make a good guess as to what >e prevailing sentiments of the Ro- P'Mi populace were. If we were able 0 take a poll of public opinion of first "''I second century Rome, the over- helming response would probably live been - "We never had it so Pod. Those who lived on "public Pjstance" and in subsidized rent-free 1 low nut dwellings, would certainly j>ve assured us that now, at last, thev |rj security.'' Those in the rapidly |panding bureaucracy - one of the most efficient civil services the world lias ever seen — would tell us that now government had a "conscience" and was using its vast resources to guarantee the "welfare" of all of its citizens; that the civil service gave them job security and retirement benefits; and that the best job was a government job! Progressive members of the business community would have said that business had never been so good, that the government was their largest customer, which assured them a dependable market, and that the government was inflating currency at about 2 per cent a year, which instilled confidence and gave everyone a sense of well- being and prosperity. And no doubt the farmers were well c Ion ,ve the ations? pleased, too. They supplied the grain, the pork and the olive oil, at or above parity prices, for the government's doles. The government had a continuous program of large-scale public works which were said to stimulate the economy, provide jobs and promote the general welfare, and which appealed to the national pride. The high tax rates required by the subsidies discouraged the entrepreneur with risk capital which, in turn, favored the well-established, complacently prosperous businessman. It appears that there was no serious objection to this by any of the groups affected. An economic historian, writing of business conditions at this period, says, "The chief object of economic activity was to assure the individual, or his family, a placid and inactive life on a safe, if moderate, income. . . There were no technical improvements in industry after the early part of the second century." There was no incentive to venture. Inventions began to dry up because no one could reasonably expect to make a profit out of them. Home was sacked by Alaric and his Goths in 410 A.D. Hut'long before the barbarian invasions, Rome was a hollow shell ol the once noble republic. Fe ■brw"m Fa(ts Foki-m News, February, 1956 Its real grandeur was gone and its people were demoralized. Most of the old forms and institutions remained. Rut a people whose horizons were limited by bread and circuses bad destroyed the spirit while paying lip- service to the letter of their once hallowed traditions. The fall of Rome affords a pertinent illustration of the observation by the late President Lowell of Harvard University, that "No society is ever murdered — it commits suicide." I do not imply that bread and circuses are evil things in themselves. Man needs material sustenance and he needs recreation. These needs are so basic that they come within the purview of every religion. In every religion there is a harvest festival of thanksgiving for good crops. And as for recreation, we need only recall that our word "holiday" was originally "holy day," a day of religious observance. In fact, the circuses and games ol old Rome were religious in origin. The evil was not in bread and circuses, per se, but in the willingness of the people to sell their rights as free men tor full bellies and the excitement of the games which would serve to distract them from the other human hungers which bread and circuses can never appease. The moral decay of the people was not caused by the doles and the games. These merely provided a measure of their degradation. Things that were originally good had become perverted and, as Shakespeare reminds us, "Lilies that fester smell worse than weeds." CAN WE PROFIT FROM HISTORY? But something else was happening far below the surface of Roman political life during the first three centuries of our era. Here and there in parts of the Roman Empire around the Mediterranean were little groups of people who were trying, as best they could, to follow One who had said, "I inn the Way, the Truth and the Life." These groups, so insignificant at first in numbers, later to be subjected to persecution and slaughtered in the games to provide entertainment, were eventually to become the force that would stop the cruel combats of the arena and, when Rome collapsed, would salvage from the ruin the remnants of Home's grandeur for a legacy to Western civilization. The doles and games lasted for centuries in spite of attempts to stop them by political power. They continued until a new religious faith gave the multitude something to live by and to die for! Man does not live by bread Page 5 If
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