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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
File 006
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 006. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 14, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/845.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 006. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/845

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 006, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 14, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/845.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript fc£5U. (Continued) OF B R EAA h the nation. But just as the vigor of an organization or tii a nation is dependent upon the moral strength and stamina of its people, so will its decay ensue with the decay of its people. Money and machines become sterile and unproductive without the right kind of men to use them. Therefore, in these troubled days of hot and cold wars, inflation, deflation, depression, recession, crime, corruption, juvenile delinquency and other economic and social problems, we should attempt to appraise the effects of our current policies (governmental, social, and economic) on the character and spiritual health of our basic resource, the people of this nation. This is our chief concern. This is what has made our country the envy of the world. THE LESSONS OF HISTORY There are many lessons to be learned from the records of history. And. of these, I believe we can gain most from a study of the moral decay which preceded the disintegration of the Roman Empire. The characteristics of the early Roman people, the story of the founding of their kingdom, and later their republic, their independence of thought, their devotion to freedom, their individuality, their industry, all point to the tact that our own pioneers had much in common with those sturdv folk. But Home was only 8)2 centuries old when the poet Juvenal penned his famous tirade against his degenerate countrymen. About 100 A.D. he wrote: "Now that no one buys our votes, the public has long since cast off its cares; the people that once bestowed commands, consulships, legions and all else, now meddles no more and longs eagerly for just two things, bread and circuses." Forty years later, the Roman historian, Fron- to, echoed the charge in more prosaic language: "The Roman people is absorbed by two tilings above all others, its food supplies and its shows." Here was a once-proud people, whose government had been their servant, who had finally succumbed to the blandishments of clever political adventurers. They had gradually relinquished their sovereignty to government administrators to whom they had granted absolute powers, in return for food and entertainment. And the surprising thing about this insidious progression is that, at the time, few realized that they were witnessing the slow destruction of a people by a corruption which would eventually transmute a nation of self-reliant, courageous, sovereign individuals into a mob, dependent upon their government for the means or sustaining life. Like the rest of the world, Rome, during those early centuries, was largely agricultural. Its people obtained their economic necessities in the only way that these can be produced: they worked in order to eat. Economic goods are produced by the application of human energy to nat- jjportet ural resources. Once produced, "Jand h goods may be consumed by the itortuii diicer or lie may trade them orkln|| them away or someone may steal '"p,,,,,] from him. But robbery cannot P |.ri) duce goods. It can only deprive „as a producer of what is rightfully hr*fjv.c, , Itlnoni DESTRUCTION BY SOCIAL CANOol th, itheb. The Creator has laid down the Ca| |lc that "man shall eat his bread '"icured sweat of his face." But, unfortunjiuttir there are always people who beBjstor that they can improve on the Tinstan ator's scheme of things. So. tln'Vand , tempt to substitute a man-madejivere. which says, "If you are smart (.'"* \ , or strong enough, you can eat "jtory, bread in the sweat'of the tithe'ol ,]',, low's face." the n It did not take the smart B°jjaiul si long to find ways of acquiring TOf l)u peoples' property without workioHency it. that is, by conquest and <'llS7>est I ment of the conquered. At the ynant time, they resorted to another h, , , p ent. They kept the reins ol S0,Jur\ , ment in the hands of a riilin? .is ail whose members used their p"^,piaiis live on the labor of the '"''"/am,. chised. In order to appease thoS* oe do were made uncomfortable b\ ye'eaki rangement, the rulers resorted wlarci program of "social legislation, inoiiji which we now call "welfare stu ^he b This was the beginning of tl'eiob h Continual wars which re turned Ousin, der and slaves to Rome, thus bi'"iie ai honest labor into disrepute; a sfOreig dependence on a government 'jous 1 had no foundation of clear-c"' '."id ,1 ciples; a permanent dole wh>c he ]), ng i, vorth in < >[> ft L'NDKH Page 4 The Roman historian, Fronto, echoed the charge of the poet Juvenal about 40 years later in more prosaic language: "The Roman people is absorbed by two things above all others, its food supplies and its shows." Have the American people learned enough from history to avoid the pitfall that caused the ruin of dozens of civilizations? Facts Forum News, Feu/"'"1',
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