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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
File 005
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 005. 1956-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/844.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-02). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 005. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/844

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956 - File 005, 1956-02, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/909/show/844.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 2, February 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 2, February 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date February 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript ■ affords ition of the late Preside University- ever murde»l ide.' " -Admiral Ben Moreell's twenty-nine years of outstanding naval service has brought him many honors, including the Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit, several honorary degrees, a decoration from the British government, and two from the Republic of Haiti. Of all his citations, however, he is proudest of being called "King Bee of the Seabees," for he was organizer during the first part of World War II of that remarkable group of "Can-Do Boys," the Naval Construction Battalion. Well known as a brilliant student, naval engineer, impromptu speaker, and a tireless worker, Moreell came up through the ranks, becoming a lull admiral in 1945. Consistent with his belief in hard work is the remark he once made to a friend: "If you can't find enough work to keep busy, you can always write a book," which he did early in his career with marked success. When Admiral Moreell retired from active naval duty in 1946, his "active duty" in private industry and in government service was just beginning. Both labor and management have lauded his ability and objectivity in dealing with strike problems. He has served as chairman of the important Task Force on Water Resources and Power of the Hoover Commission. At present he is Chairman of the Board of the Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation, one of the largest steel companies of the world. re ff\d Circuses By ADMIRAL BEN MOREELL [ WANT TO sell you an idea. And till I ask in payment is that you think it over, and if you like it, sell it to others! II want to sell you the idea that individual freedom, an separable part til which is moral responsibility to God Id to one's neighbor, is the secret of our survival as a if nation, just as il was the inspiration of the founders our republic. This concept of individual freedom de- ands that we do something about it — that we re-estab- |h as our guiding beacon those moral values and pimples of government which found expression in our eelaiatitm of Independence and our Constitution. Let us begin our discussion of freedom on the mundane v'el of material prosperity and the reasons therefor. Perhaps the most intriguing question of our times, one liieh baffles our friends and enemies, is this: what makes c lias io"r - morita so productive? and .t is a nation with barely 6 per cent of the world's "ople which produces almost 40 per cent of the world's <><ls. How does this happen? Some have attributed it to r great natural resources; i.e., the abundance of our raw terials, the fertility of our soil, the blessings <>i a tem- rate climate, and the protection against enemies afforded natural barriers. It is generally conceded that our °ple have no more innate intelligence than the peoples the countries whence the) came. So our favored posi- 11 is attributed to gifts showered upon us as manna 'in heaven. >r just two ises." News. FebnM £cts Forum News, February, 1956 But doubts arise when one compares our advantages with those of others. For there are some countries even more favored than ours in raw materials, fertile soil, climatic conditions, protective harriers and other geological and geographic gifts. Furthermore, our natural advantages lay for centuries relatively unused, supporting fewer than a million inhabitants. Now they support 165 million people of our own who, in turn, support much of the rest of the world. What is the answer? It is my purpose to explore that question with you, to learn what accounts for our present pre-eminence, and whether the things we are now doing will serve to maintain or destroy it. Every productive organization needs three essential elements: men, money and machines. The greatest of these is men! For with men of high moral character, ability and devotion to a worthy purpose, one can acquire the mone) and the machines. The basic essential is the right kind of men! We have many proofs of this in our industrial corporations. There are many examples of outstanding success which sprouted from lowly beginnings. And always the measure of success is the reflection of one man, or of a small group of men, who have imbued the organization with their character, ability and devotion! As it is with industrial corporations, so it is with our nation. National productivity is the summation of the productivities of the groups and individuals who comprise Page 3
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