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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 024. 1955-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/793.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 024. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/793

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 024, 1955-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/793.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 024
Transcript SCHWARTZ (Continued from Page 21) Prof. Hodges: To me, it's always easier to see the other fellow's successes than our own; and in part I would say that we magnify the successes of the Soviet. I wouldn't follow Buckley's judgment or naivete on the part of Eden. That's diplomatic technique, a tactic, and the British are committed to act as spokesmen. Intermediary is what they want to be, of course. I wouldn't regard it as significant in terms of propaganda. I think that we ought to emphasize that sometimes Soviet propaganda goes wrong. For instance, I believe in Iran it's gone wrong. Very, very definitely there was a loss there, and it was easily traced. I would say that we all have to form a balance here; and I would take the position that we're not doing too badly, but we can do a great deal better. Mr. Combs: I don't believe that it is necessary for me to equivocate the case. Communism is not only winning the propaganda battle abroad, communism is winning the world very rapidly. Unless we do something about it, the world is going to be lost. However, with reference to something Mr. Buckley said a moment ago about the effectiveness of Communist propaganda in England, I might point out that one function of Soviet propaganda is to drive a wedge between the Inited States and Great Britain. And in the pursuit of that objective, the Kremlin has had some remarkably efficient support from one or two American politicians — to whom it's not necessary to make reference now. 1 am inclined to believe, however, that England is le-- concerned about, let us say, the subtleties of Kremlin propaganda than she is about the horrid actuality of the atomic bomb and tin- proximity of Russian bombers to the British Isles. That perhaps accounts for a certain degree of cowardice on the part of Britain, but it is a cowardice that might afflict and probably will afflict the Inited States, too, unless we take long and vigorous measures to build our military potential to an adequate defensive posture and an aggres- -i\e- pie-tun- as well. Are there shortcomings in the American propaganda system abroad? \ln. I'd i kley: There are not only shortcomings; there are contradictions, in my opinion. For example, I'm told that when a number of Frenchmen went to our information offices in Paris about a year ago to try to get the real dope on the Rosenberg case — which the Communist apparatus in France had tried to make as a case of gross anti-Semitism here —there wasn't one office in the Page 22 United States Information Service in Paris at that time who was in a position to answer these questions out of a first-hand knowledge of the case. An instance like that, I'm afraid, can be multiplied almost invariably. But I think more interesting here are the basic contradictions in American propaganda techniques of the sort that make it almost impossible for us to be effective. One of these is, of course, that on the one hand we want to encourage the people behind the Iron Curtain and yet, on the other band, we're constantly telling them in effect, out of the other side of our mouths, that FACTS FORIM NEWS goes to a significant number of persons through gift subscriptions purchased by donors who thus express and appeal to patriotism. If you are one of those so designated, your donor would no doubt be pleased to have your evaluation of FACTS FORIM NEWS we are prepared to have a peaceful coexistence with the Soviet Union. This is a contradiction which not even the most skillful Goebbels could possibly overcome. The second contradiction lies in the fact that we base our propaganda, as I understand it, on the premise thai truth will triumph. Unfortunately, I believe that experience proves that this is a very unsafe- premise as witness the fact that truth did not triumph in Weimar. Germany, nor is truth triumphing in France itself primarily because you cannot bank your propaganda system on a presupposed preference by human beings for freedom as against tyranny, even if it's an idealized tyranny. Dr. Schwartz: I think there are a great many shortcomings in the American propaganda system, and I would agree in large part with Mr. Buckley that there is a fair amount of technical incompetence among our propaganda personnel, although on the other hand there are very excellent people there, too. But 1 think the problem goes a little deeper than mere' technical competence ileal there are at least two considerations that seem to me to be central. One is that our propaganda people have gotten in the position today where they are not primarily writing or issuing propaganda for their target audience-. They are writing or issuing propaganda with the thought in the back of their mind: How will this look if somebody reads this over TV and I'm Bitting there in the witness chair? I don't care what one thinks about VI ous controversial domestic figures, we ought to realize that if we're f to give every congressman or e' senator a blank check to pillory propaganda people, we're going to a price. And that price is a Ice-- of ibility and Ihe loss of centering o> efforts on the aspirations of the tai audience. Our propagandists are ' ing into account the values of our 0 gress — not the values of our taf| audience. And a second point of course is one which Mr. Buckley was gettinl and that is the contradiction bet*! our protestations and our actions, have let tile Communists monop"' certain very key words — words > peace and coexistence — things » hi'''1 the average human being sound " good. We talk at one moment aM peace, and the next moment we jj about massive retaliation. Our p0'' must seem to many foreigners to be t ing all directions simultaneously. I *1 see how we can expect a foreigner] believe what we say, because he b* choice of about a dozen different tl"' we're saying at a given time on a g'1 subject. Prof. Hodges: I think it's very portant to pick up Dr. Schwartz's *i there because this is one of the reaW why it is wrong to attack the infofj tion services and the propaganda ac* ity of the State Department. Higb-1 policy at the very top is confusing, ' these people in the field do not j proper direction. I think it's very I portant, therefore, that we learn >' the Soviets. Now they have a trctf1 dous advantage, because they op<F on what I'd call a "monolithic l'r°' ganda basis." And not only thai I have local and national front orgs"* tions in the various national Coi nist parties. Mr. Burt: What is a "monoli propaganda basis"? Prof. Hodges: One- whole without a break in it. Dr. Schwartz: 1 think I'd . with Professor Hodges that Soviet I paganda is monolithic insofa directed to a particular audieni you look at the entire spectrum propaganda— Prof. Hodces: Oh, it's flexible. Dr. Schwartz: Extreme!) (W They say one thing to Great Britain quite another thing to Japan and a' thing to the United States, a fourth to India. In other words, they h*' series of planned contradictions bi>' contradictions to a given audience. J Mil. Comics: Back to the questij shortcomings, I haven't the slifl clciulct thai there are many technical ferences. I don't believe that it's p"r" for ii- to isolate each one of tint11 FACTS FORUM NEWS, Jannnrii-' Ice I of I It cam cial ful< use whi it i: a p Am shir the our X wai Or thei plai pie. the Afr 1 \m I ha\ pro tier I to tell goi do sio usi -eel lot ha- tra ite the I elc- fr. ci as
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