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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 021. 1955-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 9, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/790.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 021. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/790

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 021, 1955-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 9, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/790.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 021
Transcript B spending in iter. ;rs are effect! nomy. In resi By adopting the Sixteenth Amendment, which changed only a few words in one sentence of the Constitution, Americans in 1913 converted their old American form of limited federal gov- of safety devil ernment into a government of unlimited I power, very much like those of Europe." ng power of ALTERED UNDER "NEW DEAL" LABEL inemployment I lployment Act) Ihe change, of course, was not lm- on the fedej mediate or perceptible. In fact, there ilitv for "proBl was no noticeable alteration in the form tion" and "m*' ;""' behavior of the American govern- t opportunities! mcnt until Roosevelt seized upon the and seeking I °'^' worn-out quackeries of European socialism and imposed them upon the nation under the label of a "new deal."5 Roosevelt could never have obtained the money to finance the disastrous New Deal socialistic experiment if the income tax amendment had not been there to give the federal government un- limited taxing power. And if Roosevelt j had called his New Deal what it actually "cis an experiment in socialism, pat- terned after the experiment in socialism then going on in the Soviet Union — he never would have sold it to the Amer- "'.in people.5 stence of the i kind of psy intervenes in rican econonVf| ses all manner ness. It provij jarantces. It M isort in labor re basic conchj emergency, i' prices and wal lourse, say that way to swallol that we arc <ay sweep, we a economic sy1 envy world This is not to imply that a majority of the American people were so stupid ll]|(| ..id that they were taken in by false labels. that's not the way it was done. Roosevelt was first elected, not on the and the >* Ncw ]),,.,] or Socialist platform, but on I a conservative- plat form of states' rights. „ » ] He was going to reduce federal expenses, le .if the questWJ n«t down the power and size of the isile view: art-"! U'deral government, and permit political o do "not" thi» pcewer to return to the individual states successfully fl where, according to the Constitution, it ■th century <1°. belongs. Once in office, however, Roosevelt * * w,'"t in the opposite direction. By the time voters got a second crack at Roosevelt, the New Deal propaganda machine, financed with taxpayers' money, had already been operating for Socialist 1 over three years. Every person who stood up to criticize New Deal policies was sneered at and gutted with public slander by the President, the President's Wife, cabinet officers, and leading opinion formers throughout the nation. henna-, head I party, did not itform, becaug iiil.lie-an parti*] e major polioij ty. ch Norman Th°J' ■ in political '' l,,i|ja]iy, the New Deal Socialist revo- was oyerw»j lution was hampered by the American Constitution. Roosevelt's popularity could bludgeon Congress into rubber- "tamping his schemes. iters, who knovj ething new an" iciiceii to the 4 hy of the tit. s foisted upon were shrewd en ■Is of freedom iclalicins of fi''1" income tax ai aericans unwit', al W UNCONSTITUTIONALITY DECLARED Above popular pressures, the Supreme < ..ml, however, declared basic features of the New Deal unconstitutional. In 1937, Roosevelt openly tried to pack the Supreme Court but failed.0 were churlishly called in those days— with New Dealers who shared Roosevelt's contempt for the. Constitution of the United States.6 Another obstacle was the strength of American private industry. Roosevelt— and later, Truman—and the millionaire Socialists around them created suspicion of private industry by claiming it was all in the hands of a few greedy, rich families.7 They knew, of course, that the ownership of American business—even of the giant corporations- -scattered widely through every stratum of society, rested in the hands, not of a few, but of millions. It could not, therefore, be taken Ihe Socialist revolution was not • e- • ,ce ill»' becked for long, however. Vacancies than" the limit*!<aUsed by death enabled Roosevelt to r ii.„ fe*rpl>lace the "nine old men"—as they evers ol the 'v * I FACTS FORUM NEWS, January. 1951 dEWS,./" "<""'J' —Wide World Photo London dentist treats patient at public health dental clinic. According to the British dental association, under the government- run program, the annual net income of a dentist is $3,200. over directly; but it could be harassed and taxed until it would become helplessly dependent upon government — hence, the New Deal-Fair Deal measures bringing controls, confiscatory taxation, and large-scale government competition with private business.7 A principal obstacle to socialism was our federal system. As long as political power was distributed among forty- eight sovereign and competing states, socialism could not be imposed on the nation. An initial step toward socialism, then, was to concentrate so much taxing, legislating, controlling authority in the central federal government that the state governments would be reduced to relative insignificance. Federal subsidies to the states, while making the states dependent upon the federal government, increased federal taxation until the central government acquired a near monopoly of the taxing power. It became difficult for the state governments to operate without federal help, because the federal government had pre-empted their resources in taxes.8 By Communist-inspired-and-written labor legislation — like the Wagner Act of 1935 — the government gave tremendous help to the Socialists' hate-the- American-businessman propaganda. It gave the great Socialist-dominated unions autocratic control over millions of American working people and over business; and it built these unions into powerful economic propaganda and political action groups constantly exerting pressure for more centralization of power in the federal government.8 As state governments surrendered their sovereignty by looking to Washington for handouts, individual citizens absorbed the same altitude. Everyone seemed to imbibe the Socialist idea that political power concentrated in Washington could solve our problems. Consider also the New Deal system of government by giant federal agencies, operating under broad, vague grants of power by Congress.10 The administrators of the great executive agencies wield enormous power in America hut have no direct responsibility to the public and only a nebulous, indirect responsibility to the Congress, which gave them all of their power.10 Ask yourself who is the head of the Small Business Administration, or of the Tennessee Valley Authority, or of the Commodity Credit Corporation — federal agencies which dispose of enormous sums of your money and exercise vast power over your economic life; federal agencies which use taxpayers' money to produce and sell electrical power in competition with the taxpayers; federal agencies which take the money of all taxpayers and lend it to, or build houses for, a chosen few; agencies which lake the money of all in order to subsidize some.10 Do you know who runs those agencies? If you do know, and happen not to like who runs them, is there anything you can do about them? The New Deal-Fair Deal system of government by executive agencies further promotes a dangerous centralization of power by breaking down the old constitutional system of checks and balances and separation of powers. According to the Constitution, Congress was supposed to make the laws. The President was supposed to enforce the laws; the federal courts were supposed to interpret the laws.11 As we develop government by executive agencies, however, we find that administrative rules and regulations have come to have the force of law. Page 19
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