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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 014. 1955-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/783.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 014. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/783

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 014, 1955-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/783.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 014
Transcript When McCarthy first got on the anti- Communist bandwagon, be was a member of the minority party, and played only a minor role on the subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations. The grave danger of his emotionalism, his name-calling, his insinuations, his numerous irresponsibilities, and his incompetence as an investigator, became grimly apparent to the whole nation. however, after the Republican victory of 1952. In the Republican-controlled Congress, McCarthy, now a member of the majority party, was no longer merely a noisy nuisance. He was Chairman of the Senate Committee on Government Operations — and thus one of the most powerful men in Washington.5 His greatest fiasco perhaps was his investigation of the Voice of America. Let us consider a few specific cases. With regard to the Latin-American desk of the Voice of America, McCarthy's charges of pro-communism were refuted by an overwhelming mass of documentary evidence. McCarthy had to permit the evidence to be filed, but he did not make it a part of the record. McCarthy's charges against the Latin- American desk were televised. The rebuttal was not. Even Senator Mundt, second ranking member of the McCarthy Committee, and not known as a foe of McCarthy, said that the committee was wasting a lot of time." The charges against the French desk of the Voice of America were spread on the record, but they were not followed up. If there were any truth in the charges — if there were any possibility of proving them — McCarthy had a deep obligation to subpoena all those who bad been named before the committee. In a very large number of cases he did not do so. Troup Mathews, Acting Chief of the French desk, was accused of inviting a new Voice of America employee to join a Marxist colony, but Mathews was never called to a public session to defend himself against this damaging charge. —Wide World Photos One of many climaxes in 1950 Washington hearings on charges of Communist infiltration in the State Department came when Owen Lattimore (right) made complete denial of allegation by Senator McCarthy (left) that Lattimore was "Russia's top spy" in the United States. —Wide World t* Anti-McCarthy pickets marched outside the Hotel Astor in New York City where Send' McCarthy was principal speaker at a dinner honoring Roy Cohn. A McCarthy witness charged that the French desk of the Voice of America had broadcast an entire speech by Jacob Malik, Soviet delegate to the United Nations, without comment or rebuttal. McCarthy never called the appropriate officials of the Voice to give them a chance to answer or comment on this charge — which had been made, of course, in public testimony.6 Edwin Kretzmann, policy adviser of the Voice of America, who had hurried to the hearings of his own free will, by unmistakable- insinuation was accused of pro-communism, but was not called again to answer specific charges. Senator McCarthy went so far as to suggest that Kretzmann followed the Daily Worker line by attacking Syngman Rhee, President of South Korea. Kretzmann explained that this attack involved one single script which had been approved by his deputy, Gordon Knox, on a day on which he himself was away from his office. Kretzmann offered to display hundreds of pro-Rhee, pro-South Korea scripts, for the record. He was never given an opportunity to do so.6 But Kretzmann was intensely questioned about the well-known author, Bertram D. Wolfe, who then was chief of the ideological advisory unit of the Voice of America. This most definitely left the impression with a large number of Americans that Wolfe might be a Communist in disguise. Yet, Bertram D. Wolfe had left the Communist party at least fifteen years before and had consistently criticized communism. It is true that Wolfe hobnobbed with other ex-Conimunisls who were in the Socialist camp. It is the right of Senator McCarthy to regard socialism as another form of subversion. If so, he ought to say it. By clearly implying that he suspected Bertram D. Wolfe of still working for communism without giving any substantial proof for these suspicions and at the same time failing ever to call Bertram Wolfe to the witness stand, McCarthy not only defamed an Ameri- c an citizen, but he shamefully abu* his power as a congressional inve* gator " McCarthy's interrogation of James Wechsler, editor of the New York ?* l)la<'' was of the same nature. , ™ ] Wechsler's own writings prove 10 be was fighting communism long be" ' . McCarthy ever started. As early J JJ1"11 1940, Wechsler wrote a book on J°j ".. L. Lewis in which he exposed the sne* . ways of Communist infiltration '" r , i u Carl labor unions. . ■ \\ hen McCarthy got Wechsler on » ^ witness stand, Wechsler naturally It* n to show proof of his anti-communi* He offered as an exhibit a state"" issued by the Central Committee of* ]y Communist party in 1952, critici^ 0r f him along with the Reuthers and DuW __ skys. McCarthy had the gall to A evei Wechsler whether he himself had *1 | ten that Communist statement.7 this McCarthy's treatment of Wechslefi l)av the course of what was presumed to; thoi a congressional investigation, was sh"", mat ing even to people who have other! Denver Post Publisher Palmer Hoy' FA Page 12 FACTS FORUM NEWS, January,
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