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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 012. 1955-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/781.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 012. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/781

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 012, 1955-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/781.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript have conferences with them, must stay- in the United Nations with them, so that we'll know what they are up to—so that we can discuss points of conflict as they arise, iron out differences, and settle things peacefully." There are only two ways to live peacefully with the Soviets. One way is to let them have what they want. This was the way of Roosevelt. Roosevelt told William Bullitt that he thought he could get along with the Communists if he gave them everything they wanted and asked nothing in return. If we feel that we simply cannot live without dealing and mingling with the Soviets, we can negotiate a peaceful settlement of the world's difficulties at once and enter an almost endless age of peaceful coexistence—and slavery. All we have to do is give up, let the Soviets take over, and establish the great Socialist one-world which they have been openly planning since 1917." After Stalin's death, Malenkov in a speech made a few vague remarks about peaceful coexistence of capitalism and socialism; and all the soft heads of the West began to wag: "Ahhh! Now we can get along with them." Such world-renowned statesmen as Winston Churchill not only dismissed thirty-seven years of Communist treachery but also failed to note the major portions of Malenkov's speech. \A hile talking about peaceful coexistence, Malenkov also says that communism will "rebuff any policy hostile to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics."" Before long we will see: The Soviets will decide that the policies of India. Indonesia, Burma. Japan, are hostile. These nations (and after them, others) will go the way of Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania. Poland, Eastern Germany, Czechoslovakia, part of Austria, Hungary, Rumania, Albania, Tibet, China, Indochina, North Korea—all of which are now enjoying peaceful coexistence with the Soviet Union. ONE PROVEN WAY There is one proven way for us to live peacefully on the same planet with the Soviets without being devoured by them: exclude them from our society and have nothing to do with them. That's what we did from 1917 to 1933, and it worked extremely well. We did not have any wars with the Communists, because without our help—without being able to meddle in our affairs and disrupt and weaken our own policies— the Communists didn't have enough strength to make wars." We cannot honorably negotiate all or any outstanding differences between us and the Soviets. Every time we enter a conference with Communists we know before we start that we are not going to win anything. The only question is: How much will we lose this time? —Wide World Photo General George C. Marshall (left) during his meeting with Generalissimo and Madame Chiang Kai-shek in 1945. Mis. Eleanor Roosevelt entertains Soviet officials at polite teas and then talks about how really nice they are when you get to know them. Adlai Stevenson talks about the need for peaceful conferences to settle differences with the Soviets. On the same day that Soviet jets shoot down an American plane off the coast of Japan, American Ambassador Charles Bohlen attends a gay party in Moscow and drinks vodka toasts to the success of the Communist revolution and to the bloody butchers who have enslaved over a third of the world's people—and who were responsible for 401.000 American casualties in Korea." Secretary of State Dulles excuses Bohlen for wining and dining with the gangsters who are killing our men and plotting the destruction of our nation by saying that Bohlen hadn't had time to think it over or consult with Washington. President Eisenhower dismisses the whole affair by saying, in effect: Yes, it'.- bad: but don't worry! We're going to have peace with the Soviets, because their behavior on this occasion has been much more conciliatory than on previous occasions when they shot down our planes. Day after da\ in the I nited Nations, American representatives try to wheedle the Soviets into getting on the American gravy train to participate in the International Atom Pool, which is a scheme for giving away to the rest of the world fissionable materials produced in American atomic energy plants with American tax money—materials whose scarcity or abundance may ultimately mean life or death for the United States." What. There is none so blind as those WJ will not see; none so deaf as those <A will not hear. We know what the Soviets are a! what they are after; yet we go on f" tending to believe that they are I* opposite of what we know them to be. If we would maintain sufficient art aments for our own national dch'ii-' close up all Communist embassies a' consular posts in the United Stan get the United Nations headquarh of this country—thus eliminating j» privileged residence and travel win1 Communist agents of all kinds, from over the world, now enjoy here could have peace, American style. Most of the distressing problems ' the great cold war could be solved matter of months if America's top lea crs would read and respect an old I"" ,',-l,: "He who cooperates with the de* w ill be carried off by the cle\ il.' Bibliography 1 "Growing Pressures for East-West Trad! The Nation, Mar. 20, 1954, p. 238. 2 "Captive Returns," Newsweek, May ^ 1953, p. 80. 8 World Almanac, 1954. * "Where U. S. and Britain Stand N»J (Text of statements by Sir Winston 0* chill), V. S. News & World Report, JolT| 1954, p. 53. 1 "Moscow Opens Trade Offensive" Busi*1 Week, May 9, 1953, pp. 166-168. «"Red Trade—the U. S. Stand" (Inter"* with Harold Stassen lev Ernest K. I.indW Newsweek, Mar. 1, 1954, p. 31. "'New U. S. Plan for Trade witli Ke* I . S. News & World Report, Apr. 23, * 101-108. 8 V. S. News & World Report, July 9, 1* (Text of Eisenhower-Churchill Mat'-""'11 p. 57. 9"Partnership for Peace," ley Secretary; State John Foster Dulles, Stale Depart* Bulletin, O.I. t. 1954, p. 171. 10 Text of Eisenhower Press Conference, ' York Times, Nov. 11, 1954. ""Dulles Explains V. S. Foreign I'"1" (Text of an article prepared ley Secrfl eef State John Foster Dulles for the M Issue of Foreign Affairs), [I. S. Nel»> World Report, Mar. 26, 1954, pp. 74-71 12 "Stalin on Revolution," Historicus, I'""' Affairs, January, 1949. 1 Collected Works of Vladimir [lyich iM quoted in Lenin, by David Schule. publl by Double-day and Co.. In... New *' 19*8. 14 "Soviet Internationalism," ley David J- lin. The New Leader, Jan. 17, 1948. 15 "Communism Means War," by Davi' Dallin, American Mercury, October, 19a 16 American Mercury, November, 1954, P- "New York Times, May 30, 1948, P-. 18 Foreign Relations of the United States ' Soviet Union), 1933-1939, p. 110. 19 "Why Not Negotiate with the Russians' . Ernest T. Weir, Harper's, December, > 20 "Is a Settlement with Russia Possible? Edward Crankshaw, rVeic York Times ' azine, May 1, 1949. 21 Foreign Relations, pp. 731-732. 22 World Almanac, 1954. "U. S. Sets Aside Atom Materials in 'v lieaven a name, is wrong: Plan." Dallas Morning News, Nov. 16. r Page 10 FACTS FORUM NEWS, January,'
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