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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 011. 1955-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/780.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 011. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/780

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 011, 1955-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/780.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript m Bevolution leen any moo of course, jfl ts of time. pM ;very nation 1 itable cloak 1 y readilv cbJl litions alter, ca. the ConJ cover of nam hatred again. In the I "ilf ider the cloakl ig to create caj r any displaj I itional sentinel Africa — as I ice equalilariaj delicate probrl f course, do A • sores which '" i fact, they ■■ ; them worseH and suppurati"! i will always h'l the innocent *J t for themselv* rs when we ha id tyranny •'■, —even during, rnment was uSjj ans at its dispfl a worshipful j ets as our gall*? : squandering ' and the livfll the Soviet UnJ din in bis b»3 is was remin*I Bussia that ,J stand up "agj ist world, all'* ires-i'il class* ng revolt in 'J' capitalists, andil . coming out *J inst the exploit' Tuincnls. IEVITABLE" lent by Lenin, *] V Stalin and "" ays ••The exist*! c side l.\ side I a long time i* re other inn-1 ad before that Wide World '"' EWS, January, - —Wide World Photo Dmitry Z. Manuilski comes, a series of frightful clashes between the Soviet Bepublic and the bourgeois states is inevitable."" 1 he Cominform, which was founded in 1947 and which is the new version of the old Communist International, formulated its foreign policy in these words: "Inasmuch as antagonistic classes have been liquidated in the U.S.S.R. and the moral-political unity of Soviet society has been achieved, the class struggle in all its acuteness has now shifted from the Soviet Union to the international arena."" In 1950, with the Soviet drive for peaceful coexistence in full swing, Stalin, for the first time, published a letter which he had written to Maxim Corki two decades earlier—a letter in which Stalin said: We are not against every war. . . . We are for a liberating, anti-imperialist, revolutionary war. although such a war, as is known, not only is not free from horrors of bloodshed, but abounds in them."10 One of the most forthright statements of Soviet policy was made in 1930 by Dmitry Z. Manuilski, in a speech to the International Students of the Lenin School of Political Warfare. Moscow: '"War to the hilt between Communism and Capitalism is inevitable. Today, of course, we are not strong enough to attack. Our time will come in 20 or 30 years. To win we shall need the element of surprise. The bourgeoisie' will have to be put to sleep. So we shall begin by aunching the most spectacular peace movement on record. There will be elec- li ilying overtures and unheard-of concessions. The capitalist countries, stupid and decadent, will rejoice to cooperate in their own destruction. They will leap at another chance to be friends. As soon as their guard is down we shall smash them with our clenche'd fist."1" That is fairly clear, isn't it? Now. if you please, just pause for a FACTS FORUM NEWS, January, 1955 moment and let this sink into your mind. This same Manuilski has for years been one of the most prominent figures in the United Nations. In fact, he helped to draft the preamble to the United Nations Charter. When he uses the word justice, does he mean the same thing we have in mind, or does he mean lulling us with talk about peaceful coexistence through the UN, and then smashing us with the clenched fist? To us, negotiation means give and take. To the Communists, it means take —and hold on to that, until they can take some more. If, in order to gel concessions from us, they have to make promises, the Communists will make them. Then they simply repudiate their own promises. We cannot repudiate ours. We are hog-tied by our own ethics. The Communists have been doing this sort of thing since 1917—and boasting about it." None of the information which we now have about Communist methods is new. It isn't something we have discovered in the past few years. We've had it all along. Boosevelt knew all about Communist tactics. In fact, official State Department studies detailing the history and the methods of the world-wide Communist revolutionary program were urgently called to Boosevelt's attention before he recognized the Soviets in 1933, thus saving them from attack by Japan, saving them from collapse by internal revolt, and providing them protected beachheads in our own country for infiltrating our own institutions and government.11 Our top government officials knew what was going on during World War II. when we were trading eleven billion dollars of American lend-lease for Soviet spies who filched our secrets in radar and atomic energy. We knew all about Communists before we met with them in conferences in Teheran, in Yalta, in Potsdam; before we got into the United Nations with them; before General George C. Marshall went out to China to force Chiang Kai-shek to negotiate with them; and before our Secretaries of State—Mr. Acheson and Mr. Dulles—met with them at Paris, at Berlin, at Geneva. 800,000,000 INTO SLAVERY It was in conference and cooperation with Western leaders that the Soviets and their puppets negotiated eight hundred million people in Europe and Asia into slavery. Every conference we have with the Communists is a false pretense on our part that we don't know what the Communists are after: therefore we must —Wide World Photo Soldiers and sailors read "Truce Ends Korean War" on moving sign in New York. The long-awaited armistice came after three years and one month of undeclared war. If we should abandon our ethics and adopt the methods of the Communists in order to be less handicapped in our negotiations with them, then we would become like the Communists; we would already have lost the struggle to maintain our way of life. The only way to avoid this dilemma is to refuse any more negotiations with the Communists. When we sign some agreement like the Korean armistice, and then pretend that we are shocked because the Communists immediately begin to violate the very terms which they insisted on, we are kidding ourselves. We knew they were going to violate the Korean armistice agreement, just as we now know that they are violating the agreements in Indochina. —Wide World Photo General Mark W. Clark affixes his signature to Korean armistice document. Page 9
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