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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 009. 1955-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/778.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 009. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/778

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 009, 1955-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/778.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript y bined strength e world, we ° table of conqHj ision is no le"1? bat the free "J the line aga» has begun to PJ Russia and in » ic harmful efft* cargo of straw it trade and » aintaining a j" the Soviet lea# alt, their prog'1 ession. They ', if needing to ™ t of the world! ad stabilize A eason for the "J / is the death stem was built le, and therel ng of course *" I or when the 1 Igh the perioo, itorship to anoj Stalin's fun«» the Soviet Uoj business relatl'J NEW LINE Malenkov opfl gold and sent "J dollars of it * ir the purcha*! e used in bur Iritish business*! iw and given 4 , for four hund] h of British g<1 ■ years. uest of the So«J ions Economic up the proble1 its annual D* il, 1954. the urging of. nited Nations for Europe ffl1 >4, and did set" dishing work afl trade between 1 -Wide World Photo President Eisenhower and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill during their Washington conference on international problems. ful coexistence — meet them halfway without being lulled into a false sense of security, without dropping their guard or rushing into any foolish acts of appeasement. It was, in effect, somewhat in the nature of calling the Soviets' bluff about wanting freer peaceful trade with the West that Harold Stassen, chief of America's Foreign Operations Administration, flew to London and Paris in March, 1954, to work out with the British and French governments specific agreements for the easing of East- West trade." Mr. Stassen's subsequent explanation of these London and Paris agreements was essentially this: Neither we nor our allies are changing our policy of trade embargo against Communist China. We do not want to repeal or even amend the Battle Act, whicb forbids us to give aid to any nation which sends strategic goods into Communist countries. With regard to Bussia and the other Communist countries of Europe, however, we are drastically revising the list of goods previously defined—and therefore prohibited—as strategic goods.' Henceforth, such things as tractors for farm use—but not tractors for military use; industrial equipment for civilian production—but not for armaments production; and a wide variety of consumer goods previously forbidden — will now be permitted to move in trade across the Iron Curtain. By late summer, 1954, we had re- and British moved over 650 items from the list of goods which our previous embargo policy had specifically banned from East-West trade. This new policy of freer trade contains a vast psychological potential for rve a high era statesmen it the Russians si —WidG World Photo President Eisenhower and Secretary of State John Foster Dulles met with French Premier Mendes-France at the White House. For one thing, it steals from the Soviets their propaganda thunder that only they are working for peace. It is a visible and understandable demonstration to the entire world that we will meet the Soviets halfway in all efforts to achieve peace when they substitute deeds for mere propaganda. Our previous policy of trade embargo did hurt the Soviet economy grievously and was at least partially responsible for forcing the Soviets to make peaceful gestures and turn their attention to the problems of peace. Having achieved this tremendous alteration in Soviet policy by using our trade embargo as a weapon against their aggressiveness, we are now modifying that trade embargo policy and showing our willingness to encourage the Soviets in peaceful pursuits.7 NO APPEASEMENT This change in our policy is, by no stretch of the imagination, appeasement of the Soviets. It is rather an example of a frank and daring policy of enlightened self-interest. We are using our strength, our influence, and our diplomacy to direct the attention and energies of the Soviet people toward the production and exchange of peaceful goods. As people become more and more occupied with peaceful activities, they will think less of war. And as they think less of war, the danger of war recedes. When Churchill came to the United States in June, 1954, and urged that we in the Western world should make a good try at peaceful coexistence with the Soviets, many thoughtful Americans were skeptical. Much of the skepticism vanished two days later, however, when President Eisenhower clarified America's position. President Eisenhower also believes that peaceful coexistence between the non-Communist nations and the U.S.S.B. and Bed China is the hope of the world. He promises that the United States will continue to do anything proper to achieve such coexistence; but he also vows that this nation will not be a party to any treaty that makes anybody a slave.8 The Western world's efforts to call the Soviet bluff about peace and disarmament have paid off enormously. When the General Assembly of the United Nations convened in New York in the fall of 1954, the United States instantly seized the initiative from the Soviets by directing the Assembly's attention to the questions of disarmament and peace. For the first time since —Wide World Photo President Eisenhower with U. S. Ambassador to Russia Charles Bohlen. 1946, Soviet delegates in the United Nations have gone along with the United States, Britain, France, and Canada in a request to the United Nations to get to work on disarmament, starting with conventional weapons rather than with atomic weapons. This is the most startling concession to the West which the Soviet Union has ever made in the United Nations." One of the most remarkable indications of how far we have gone in our determined drive toward peace on earth was the reaction of our President and of the nation in November, 1954, when Soviet fighter planes shot down an American B-29 off the coast of Japan. AMERICANS KNOW THEIR STRENGTH This is just the kind of incident that can goad a jittery and fearful nation into rash and dangerous action. But today, the American people are sanely and soberly aware of the full measure of their massive strength; and they have calm, wise leadership. They received the news of this Russian outrage with manly and restrained indignation, refraining from reckless recrimination and saber-rattling that might have broken the calm of real peace which is settling upon the world. President Eisenhower, instead of frothing and flexing the national muscles about this latest Soviet atrocity, gave it only passing reference in a press conference that dealt with other matters, and in that same conference had the good sense and courage to announce that despite such unfortunate incidents, d deeds about p FACTS FORUM NEWS, January, 1955 —Wide World Photo President Eisenhower conferred with Dr. Konrad Adenauer during the West German Chancellor's Washington visit. Page 7 IEWS, Janua
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