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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 008. 1955-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/777.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 008. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/777

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 008, 1955-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/777.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript A question of universal interest PEACEFUL COEXISTENCE Is this the cure-all for the world's ills? Is there any possibility of negotiating a settlement of major differences between us and the Soviet Union and thereby achieving peaceful coexistence? ***** As usual, let's look at the question from two opposite sides, taking first the arguments of some who say "Yes." » * * # # l[o one can deny that there is a new 11 look in Soviet foreign policy. Even if we do not have faith in the sincerity of that new policy, we should do what we can to encourage it—without, of course, letting down our defenses. Suppose that Russia's new, relatively conciliatory policy is a hoax: If we can keep them talking about peace among their own people, with their own satellites, and in the United Nations, we at least have a chance of leading them toward a genuinely peaceful attitude. The alternative is a ghastly war—a war which, as Winston Churchill said, would leave us, even if victorious, the victors over a world in ruin. Actually, the Soviet cold war offensive has diminished in a startling way since the death of Joseph Stalin.1 The East German revolt and the Soviet decrees in the autumn of 1953, designed to raise food production, provided real evidence that conditions inside the Soviet Union were compelling Kremlin leaders to concentrate on internal economic problems. In Austria, the Russians have removed barriers to movement in and out of their occupation zone. They have exchanged ambassadors with Vienna. In Turkey, the Russians have abandoned their postwar claims to certain Turkish areas bordering Russia, and they have dropped their demands for military bases on the Bosporus and the Dardanelles. Bussia has renewed normal diplomatic relations with Yugoslavia. In Czechoslovakia, American newsman William Oatis was freed after two years in prison.* The Soviets even apologized to England for shooting down a British bomber in the Berlin sector. These are only a few of the remarkable incidents in Europe and in the Near East. In the Far East, the successful stopping of two major shooting wars, in Korea in 1953 and in Indochina in 1954, by the process of peaceful negotiation, are proof that something has caused a basic alteration in Soviet plans. What is it? There are some obvious causes for the change in Soviet policy. One is the stand of the United Nations in Korea. By promptly meeting Soviet aggression m m —Wide World Photo UN Security Council heard debate on American complaint that Soviet fighters shot down a U.S. Navy bomber off Siberia Sept. 3. Page 6 in Korea with the combined strength! the free nations of the world, we *| rupted the Soviet timetable of conqU* and proved thai aggression is no \om profitable/' It is very apparent that the free »»' strategy of holding the line agai» Communist aggression lias begun to pj off. Extreme unrest in Bussia and in" satellite states, plus the harmful elf1* of the American embargo of strati* goods from East-West trade and ' economic drain of maintaining a ^ economy, have forced the Soviet lea"* to slow down, if not halt, their prog'* of imperialistic aggression. They * now in the position of needing to ■* in peace with the rest of the world order to maintain and stabilize *"j they have.* Another apparent reason for the *' look in Soviet policy is the death' Stalin. The Soviet system was buil' the dictator principle, and there bound to be an altering of course V» dictators are changed or when the ' tion is passing through the periotj change from one dictatorship to ano] In his oration at Stalin's funfl Malenkov said that the Soviet 01 welcomes trade and business relatl with all the world. MALENKOV'S NEW LINE Shortly after that, Malenkov op^ up Stalin's hoard of gold and sent lj dreds of millions of dollars of it I Western countries for the purchafj local currency to be used in birf! Western goods. A delegation of British business'* was invited to Moscov and given a1-'" orders and promises for four hunO1 million dollars" worth of British rc" during the Qexl three years. It was at the request of the So11 thai the United Nations Economic. Social Council took up the problef East-West trade in its annual m& in New York in April, 1954. Again, it was at the urging 01 Soviets that the United Nations ' nomic Commission for Europe rfle Geneva in May, 1954, and did set' constructive, accomplishing work o* problem of freer trade between and West." History will reserve a high pla0* honor for the Western stalesmen-'j ticularly American and British have managed to meet the Russians I way in their talk and deeds about p^ FACTS FORUM NEWS, Janwtryk
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