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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 004. 1955-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 18, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/773.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 004. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/773

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 004, 1955-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 18, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/773.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript Colonel Hanley was rebuked, transferred out of his job, and the truth of his information denied by our own government.7 Our United Nations allies kept us involved in fruitless, frustrating peace talks in Korea for fifteen months, until October, 1952. Time and again during that period the Communists broke off the cease-fire talks with trumped-up charges of violations on our part and launched surprise attacks. Time and again we would hold our men back for more cease-fire talks, at the very moment when a determined push would have destroyed the enemy.0 We finally broke off the talks in October, 1952; but in April, 1953, we leaped with as much unseemly haste as before when the Reds suggested prisoner exchange and more talks.8 Again we followed the United Nation- lead and went through one of the most humiliating experiences in American history. We entered into a good faith agreement with the Communists to exchange all sick and wounded prisoners. On April 15, 1953, when the prisoner exchange began, American fliers, sent up to watch the progress of the exchange, had to fight their way through Communist antiaircraft fire. These American fliers reported hundreds of enemy trucks, boldly rolling along in broad daylight on the roads designated for transporting UN prisoners to the point of exchange. The trucks bore the specified markings which kept our men from attacking them. But they were not carrying our prisoners. They were carrying ammunition and fresh Communist troops. Thus, the moment the exchange *•;£ - '£? 1 b^5 4—=gj^— 14«dk.^,8k»- —Wide World Photo American POW's return to freedom during prisoner exchange in Korea. —Wide World Photo The Army released this photo showing bodies of victims in the Taejon massacre in Korea. began, we knew the Communists were violating the terms of the agreement, sneering at us and maneuvering in position to kill more of our men. Yet we supinely went through with the deal, handing over six thousand of their prisoners, following our part of the agreement to the letter. They returned 120 Americans, keeping back men who were desperately ill and in need of decent hospitalization — keeping them back to be used as political hostages and as propaganda fodder to prove to the people of China that the American nation could not even protect its own soldiers.9 OUTCRY OF RAGE After the little handful of exchanged American prisoners came back, they told stories of brutality, starvation, exposure, physical and mental torture, and of Americans shot in the back of the head or kicked off a road to die. They told, in short, stories which our government had known all about and had formally reported to the United Nations over a year before — stories which our government had rebuked Colonel Hanley for revealing and which our government wanted to keep from the American people.9 There was an outcry of rage from the American public when we finally got an inkling of what was happening to our soldiers in Korea. Our government placated American public opinion by blustering and talking about the Communist atrocities in the spring and summer of 1953; but we nonetbeless continued our negotiations for an armistice and, in July, 1953, concluded an armistice agreement with the Communists on terms written largely by the Communists and by India.10 The most important provisions of those armistice agreements had to do with the exchange of prisoners. We promised to repatriate all Comniuni-i prisoners who wanted to return, and they promised to release all American prisoners who wanted to come home. From the day the agreement was signed, our government knew that the Communists were violating it.10 At the time we signed the Korei armistice agreement in July, 1953, 01 government had the names of 951 Ann ican soldiers who were listed ii own records as missing in action bl presumed to be prisoners of war in tl hands of the Communists — but whoi nanus, however, were not on » repatriation lists that the Communif were giving us. They were presumed \ be prisoners of war because all of ther subsequent to the time when they we< first reported missing in action, "j been mentioned in Communist ra> broadcasts as being alive or had actual been seen in Communist prison earn by other American prisoners. In anstfj to our feeble protests that they were °J returning all American prisoners, "I Communists made it very clear that thi were holding some Americans as poll" cal prisoners, although they would neV tell us who or how many.11 As the process of prisoner exchan? drew to a close and word leaked out *■ the American public that the ComB** nists still held over 950 AmeriC soldiers whom they were keeping J political hostages in violation of *j Korean armistice terms, there was gr6* pressure on our government to do sow thing to rescue these American &\ diers.11 What did the American govi-nin11'1 do by way of rescuing its own soldier* It made protests. Pentagon brass J* ally devised a way to stop public p7* sure on this issue. It started killing tH American boys off in the files. In otM words, instead of continuing to rep*j the 951 as missing in action or as ST being held by the Communists, whj] was actually the case, the Pentagon "l gan to report them as dead. And thu' reduced the number of \merican H held mun simr If quie teen ing gove won viou ciah thos w the teen way ica can llol kiln can grac and bod —Wide World This Department of Defense picture, leased in connection with Korean war off. ties, shows a U.S. Army officer exan1''! one of the blood-spattered cells in a N Korean Army prison. the alii int rnu di| n is align alii Fj Page 2 FACTS FORUM NEWS, January,
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