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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 003. 1955-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/772.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 003. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/772

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955 - File 003, 1955-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/839/show/772.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 1, January 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript E LB ys 'ubliahed month1' diapellinK publ* Any article cor nailintc iirivilrt" . Vice Preau mberth, Mrs. dent SO" Smith, Lloydl H. L. Hunt, M";- E. E. MrU'"llc"i i. Wood. Hanfu" Blockading The China Coast Mao Tse-tung says America is a paper tiger which can roar and make noise but which cannot even defend its own. In view of Communist China's recent imprisonment of thirteen Americans being held as "spies," does Senator William Knowland's recommendation to blockade China provide the solution to forcing their release? (I in 1954? I opularize 1 al mergers • nists? kbone, prival today than 1 ibly dischargl mised in 1952.; i' scales Milf'1'' nniunism? light of recti ■ ries like India; •re that of 1 to communist . recognition I ? only defensl billion on o"' h l>ii>^ia V ay to curb ''"' ?" be answeJ —Wide World Photo Senator William F. Knowland (R-Calif.) talks to reporters. On \"\cmber 24, 1951, the Chinese Communists announced that they had imposed prison sentences on thirteen Americans, eleven of whom were members of our armed forces and two of whom were said to be civilian employees of the Armv. The Communists said that all of these Americans were shot down in a plane which was over Chinese territory and that, inasmuch as China was not at war, they were therefore violating neutral territory and were not legitimate prisoners of war but were to be treated as ~|iics.' Two days later, on November 26, the American State Department sent a note of protest to Peiping. The State Department denounced the charges as "base- less and said that the treatment of the men violated the Korean armistice agreement for return of all prisoners of war. It demanded their immediate release.2 On November 27, Senator William Knowland recommended that if Communist China refused to release the Americans being held as spies, the I nited Stales should blockade China.3 On November 28, the Communists formally rejected the American protest.2 On November 29. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles, in a speech in Chicago, rejected Knowland's suggestion that we blockade China.* Facts Forum's question: "Should the United Stales impose a blockade of Communist China to force the release of American prisoners?" >lic' ai rmine Christ! wers on a sepaf*\ le no opinion *" im, Dallas I, 1'*" me as if they *' SINCE the beginning of the Korean war, our government has had full knowledge that the Communists were murdering, torturing, brain-washing American prisoners fallen into their hands.5 By June, 1951, the United States High Command in Korea had accumulated documentary and eyewitness evidence to prove that over eight thousand American soldiers had been tortured and murdered by the Communists. What did we do about it? In July, 1951. General Ridgway sent a confidential report on it to the United Nations. What did the United Nations do about it? Nothing. The United Nations suppressed the report - did not even put it on the agenda for discussion.5 \\ hy? They did not want to offend Russia or the Chinese Communists. Just two weeks before the UN received General Ridgway's report on Communist atrocities in Korea, Jacob Malik, Russia's delegate to the United Nations, had suggested a cease-fire in Korea for peace talks. The reason that Malik suggested this cease-fire was to save the Communists. They were in bad shape; we had them on the run. Our generals in the field there had made it abundantly clear to Washington that we could destroy Communist power, not only in Korea but in Asia, if we would take the wraps off our armies and let them fight, instead of merely holding them on the front lines where they could be slaughtered.0 But the IN did not want to destroy the Communists. Our allies said that if we started talking about Communist atrocities in Korea, we would agitate the Communists and make it difficult to talk peace with them. The Acheson-Tru- man State Department, endorsing this argument, tried to keep all information about the torturing and murdering of our men concealed from the American people; and we entered into the truce negotiations, which were nothing more than a trap to give the Communists a chance to bring up reinforcements, regroup their strength, and prepare for surprise attacks against our forces.6 But in November. 1951. there was a serious leak. Lieutenant Colonel James llanlev. then Chief of the War Crimes Sec lion of the Eighth Army in Korea. created consternation in the United Nations and in the American State Department by telling the press in Korea aboul evidence that the Communists had tortured and murdered thousands of United Stales prisoners.7 -Wide World Photo Gaunt from malnutrition and mistreatment, Master Sergeant Barney Ruffato. of Lead, S.D., was one of about 21 American prisoners of war who survived the Red massacre of at least 68 other POW's north of Sunchon, North Korea. •'ACTS FORUM NEWS, January, 1955 242678 Page 1
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