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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955
File 049
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 049. 1955-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/748.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 049. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/748

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 049, 1955-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/748.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 049
Transcript UNIQUE ROLE OF ADMIRAL STRAUSS 'Continued front Page 35) argument, as usually put, overlooks the facl that from the point of view of the ' nited States it is of the essence where 'he scientific progress in question lakes place. Scientific progress in Soviet Russia would l.e- scientific progress, but tin- results of ii mighl well be injurious father than beneficial to the I nited states. The point is so elementary thai " may appear strange that there ever )vas any confusion aboul the mailer. Yel "i facl there has been much confusion. and the claim has repeatedly been made fnat the United States should lifl secur- l,v restrictions in order thai scientific Progress in general thus including hos- J1'' as well as friendly nations mighl '"' made more rapidly. Ii has been customary for adherents "} this position to state or impl) thai 'rauss, like security-conscious men in ''sser positions, has impeded progress. "u- Atlantic Monthly for September '"53 observed that "During his prevails service on the AFC. Strauss be- 1 i|iiie known as a greal dissenter, often instituting tin' sole opposition within "' commission. He hod a passion for "'''feey. as evidenced by bis fifiht to P'event the shipment of medical radio- 'Mopes to Sweden. [They were non- ""'lieal isotopes lo Norway, bul it ! '"'-"ii I mailer. | Slrauss was an exemp- "J* of a sort of scientific isolationism, '°ugh no one ever challenged led HINTON CASE CONTINUED irniii Page tl is kn Re or technical competence." 'he challenge thai lias been made ^"isists of the implication thai Strauss ■ J "ii American nationalist with tough ''ls aboul internal security is willy- '""y interfering with "Achievement." he slogan "Security by Achievement '"•ier than Security by Concealment" '"plies that concealment is fatal lo •"'Ii ".'vemenl. If it were should 'nt,. lo nothing lo fear from the Russians, . Iiieir concealment is just about per- ( "" the slogan is not true. Nor is tin' s; r,1,al bureaucratic extension true — ^'"fily l.y Achievemenl and Achieve- "'"' by Expenditure. c- ""• 'ealnieiii and Achievement in the ^national atomic competition are .lid ' ses 0l one i0D -1S surely as sales " colleitioii are two phases of com- ]rit.^e- A special efforl was made in in. . to document tbe belief lhat secur- J Interferes vt ilh achievement, but thc ""Its were negative. I• 'ewis Strauss has contributed to the Nj d Stales Alomie Energy Commis- ' both Security and Achievement. THE JOAN HINTON LETTER The render is cautioned that the foilowing document was prepared to serve as Communist propaganda. This article appeared in the PEOPLE'S chin.a oj September 16. 1951. It was written from Communist China and carried this preliminary introduction: Joan Chase Hinton. a young American scientist, witnessed the first atomic bomb explosion iii tlie New Mexican desert. A graduate of Bennington College. Miss Hinton look up graduate studies in physics al the I'niyersily of Wisconsin anil at the I niversity of Chi- rago. From 191,'! lo 1915. she was a research assistant at the atom bomb projeel at I.os Alamos. An active member of tin- \ssociation of Atomic Scientists, Miss Ilinlon was opposed lo lhe' secrecy and governmenl control which became attached lo all work on alomie research. She came to China in 194*8. In 1919 she married and is now working with her American husband in an animal-breeding farm in Inner Mon- is of Communist origin, and goha. With the publication of ihis Idler, readers are given lhe opportunity lo know lhe impressions of a young American scientist, living and working with the Chinese people, joining with ihem in their great work of peaceful construction. Federation of American Scientists 17I9 I. Street NW.. Washington 6. I). C, U.S.A. Dear Mr. Wolfe ind thi: FAS: Yesterday I received your application for re-membership in the Federation of Scientists. As I am jusl now almost directly under your feel, in Siiiviian Province, Inner Mongolia where il lakes two weeks for mail lo arrive hy donkey from lhe nearest railroad—I musl say I was rather surprised and pleased to receive your application, and in two months9 lime al lhat. "ion asked, "Whal has been happening lo you since you we're- an I AS mem her'.-'" As il was just lhe FAS and the questions wilh which il deals which drove me I" China. I thought I would lake ihe opportunity lo write lei you. though I should have told you long ago why m\ elm's stopped coming. As you probably <l«> not remember in,'. Iel me- begin hy telling you ;i bit ol my history. From as early as I can remember, I was determined to become a scientist. Even in grammar school. I can especially remember forcing ihe teachers to let me study Faraday's The ('.untile iii.-lead of taking Latin, in high school I concentrated mi chemistry, oh- lit i.nis lo all my oilier courses. Finally, in college. I settled on physics, building ;i Wilson cloud chamber in my sophomore year and spending as much time as I could getting ill the way of the *ACT 8 FORUM MEWS, March, /.".;.; cyclotron hoys al Cornell, From college I went lo Wisconsin where I studied as a graduate student for two years. As people became mure and more scarce', disappearing lo secrel places. I became restless, too. ami finally ended up al Los Vlamos where I worked another two years on the "W.B." Then came lhe bomb and Hiroshima ami lhe mass migration of alomie scientists to Washington. I first joined the association of Los Alamos scientists, ami then spent senile' six weeks in Washington working for the FAS. Your pamphlet mentions the "enthusiastic if inexperienced emissaries" now flocked lo Washington. I am afraid both these' slalc- nniits applied lo me above anybody else especially ihe inexperience. I will never forget my chagrin when I wenl l" ;i certain Senator's office to gel some information and the secretary condescendingly loeeke'el up at me asking. "Is this in connection wilh school work'.''" —me. an atomic scientist, coming lo Washington to fight for scientific freedom ami world peace—the very nerve of her! Well. m\ heart was in the righl place anyway. From Washington I went lo Chicago as an eissislanl in lhe Institute for Nuclear Studies, and later as a Fellow . By 191,'!. I had aboul one more year to go for my degree. In physics I could nol have dreamed of a heller opportunity for studying I loved it. I was jusl beginning lo gel lhe feel of quantum mechanics as though il were a part of me instead of something strange in textbooks. I was devouring Dirac and what I could get hold of em statistical mechanics. Yet lhe better things became for me in physics, the more depressed I became. Ever since thai morning when we sal on a hillock sonlh of Albuquerque and fell lhe Ileal of lhat bomb 25 miles away, something had started to stir in me. It forced me to Washington. Then I forced it down ami I,'ft for Chicago, hut il refused to stay down. The Truman doctrine, lhe Marshall Plan, the stagnation of ihe Alomie Energy Commission in the I N how could one just sil slill in a laboratory and ponder in lhe depths ol statistical mechanics. The memory of Hiroshima—15(1 thousand lives. One. two. ihree. four. fi\e. six ... 150 thousand—each a living, thinking, human being wilh hopes and desires, failures and successes, a life of his or her own all gone. And I had held that bomb in my hand. Could I sit and ponder Dirae . What was science for? For the sake of science? Thai is what I heel thought 'Continued on Page It") 1'ajre 47
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