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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955
File 038
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 038. 1955-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/737.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 038. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/737

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 038, 1955-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/737.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 038
Transcript 4) IN our one world ol danger, the I nited Stales cannot afford to be mistaken. The current drama in China might he a feint lo divert attention from Europe, as lhe Berlin blockade in 1948 diverted attention from China. But China is important. Thi' ingredients of catastrophe might fuse there. Mistakes have been made in lhe past. Generals Hurley, Wedemeyer, and Mac- Arthur have represented one si,jt-. John Carter Vincent, John Stewart Service. John Paton Davies have represented another. One side has been mistaken; in either case ii represented us. Even yel. American policy in the Far East is ambiguous, like lhe status of Owen Lattimore called lhe architecl of that policy, twice indicted for perjury, twice' largely exonerated in the opinion of Judge Luther i oungdahl. In our one world of danger no threat is too remote to be domestic. There is in the vast, exotic anil formidable obscurity of Asia an American woman with tin- plain name of Joan Hinton who confounds probability not onl) b) having lived seven years in Inner Mongolia, but alsei hy being an experienced Los Alamos scientist with atomic know-how more surely available lo Soviel use than thai of Pontecorvo or Fuchs. Sin- has been a friend of Owen Lattimore anil a friend of Robert Oppenheimer. I lei sis ter ha.- been a Friend of Gregory Silver- master. Her brother is a world traveler who in 195:1 returned lo lhe I nited Slates from Peking by way of Moscow and Prague. In 1951 he testified before the Jenner Committee, with frequent recourse t,> legal counsel and lhe 1'iflb Amendment. It is indeed one world of danger, where this precocious daughter ol a \ er- moot school principal may he a femme jatale wilh a vengeance, where this Malei llari trudges in Mongolian mini to the dairy barn nuclear cross sections in her mind and quantum mechanics "pent of"' her—interrupting these thoughts with the assessment of bet Chinese Friends, "They are not afraid of Aniii- ica. If she' must fight. China will show thai -lie' i- made of steel" reflecting wilh evident satisfaction, "the Chinese people have a will so strong thai nothing Ami-riiii can do will ever stop it." There i- an American girl a menially brilliant representative "f good slock, with superior advantages particularly educational advantages. Something is wrong. The known facts about Joan Chase Hinton are as follows: I. Sh,- is an atomic scientist of some importance. How important relative lee other scientists is hard to say. nearl) all her work Inning been done al see nt Los Alamos or in lop-secret Bed China where she is now. Her name is sign,-,I to at least one Los Alamos Technical Page 36 Report. Like ;i by-line in a metropolitan paper, ibis confers status. 2. At Eos Alamos she worked on a nuclear reactor called the "water-boiler.' This device has since lhe war been declassified. It was for some time lhe only "homogeneous" reactor in Ihe I nited States. L. R. Hafslad. AEC Director of Beaelor Development, has called il "the smallest and most economical type of chain reactor." Joan Hinton also, according to AFC. "participated in critical assembly weapon work and attended weekly scientific colloquia, which gave her access lo other classified information." (Inside Ins Alamos, scientists have always exchanged information freely even though they might be on different assignments. The matter of security "compartmentalization" was discussed in testimony of Genera] I.. R. Groves and of Dr. F. I . Condon, printed in Facts Forum News for January. 1955.) '■',. Joan Hinton left Los Alamos in December. 1915. In Washington. D. C. she participated in the scientists' lobby lo influence legislation. In Chicago she was a student al the 1 niyersily and a part-time assistant lo Dr. S. K. Allison. one ol the Foremost alomie scientists. Joan Hinton was offered employment in China in December, 1917. by the Communisl "China Welfare Fund." In 191,'! she went to China. There she married an American e'xile named Sidney Engsl or Frwin Fngst. She is now employed, according lo her brother, on a dairy farm, located, she has written, in Sui- yuan Province. Inner Mongolia, near the Russo-Chinese border. I nconfirmeu reports indicate an atomic installation in the area. L In September, 1951. th.' Chine-' Communist radio broadcast, and th'' Chinese Communist English - language press printed, a letter which Joan Hi"" Ion bail written to ihe Federation of Vmerican Scientists. 171') I. Street, N.W., Washington 6, I). C. In this letter she ill-scribed the United States as • place where. "No matter where y0" turned, you were faced by war. see"'1 work, the Navy, the Army, and madmen locked in their laboratories thinking "I1 new and heller methods of total destruction." In contrast, she wrote, "The |»'°' pie of China want peace." She urged lb1' Federation of American Scientists: "I •* your strength, use whatever you can "' work actively For peace and again-"' war." \l the same time she spoke ".. "the irresistible strength of New China, which, said Joan, "will not tolerate an) high-handed action against her ^"v ereignty." 5. In October, 1952. Joan went fro* Inner Mongolia to Peking where as ' delegate to the "Asian and Pacific Pea'1' Conference" she expressed "a deep sen8" of guilt and shame" for American ""' of the A-bomb al Hiroshima and Nap8; saki. "The audience gave a prolong"'1 FACTS FORUM NEWS, March, '■'"''' 'ette,
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