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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 037. 1955-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/736.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 037. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/736

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 037, 1955-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/736.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 037
Transcript liaiu L. Borden who after some evident mental anguish of his own wrote' to J. Edgar Hoover that: "more probably 'ban met J. Roberl Oppenheimer is an agent of the Soviet Union" William L. Borden could have had excellent reasons for this statement, while al the same lime excellent reasons existed for believing Oppenheimer lo be a loyal American. Perhaps, hy the- principle of complementarity, In- was simultaneously a loyal Mnciican anil a So\ iel agent. By ordinary rules that won't do. One Wipes lhat il will nol do for Robert "Ppenheimer either. Perhaps his numerous admissions under oath ami his Delphic revelations in public I he told ' ^ Committee Two in April 1917: "I know this from experience. I know it ls not enough to tell someone a secret; '' is very hard in give away a secret. '"ii have to work al it week alter week after week because these things are complex, lhal is out of context, hut lhe Original context does not. and no context *'ry well could, keep il from being a father startling thing for Robert Oppenheimer to have seeiel i perhaps this c°ntinuing urge to tell (and surely no one has told so much) - perhaps the <hs.ease- which Dr. Condon seemed to 'milk was disease may bring him lo full Confession after all. And in the healing u|'iih mighl come of that the health '"al wholeness eef the United States men l"1 involved. 'he Al-i.p brothers ibink. or profess to think, thai Strauss fell personal hat- h'l For Oppenheimer and thai this hat- '''I was based on wounded vanity. Op- '"'"Ii' iine-r. they believe, or affecl to be ',''*'■. refuted Strauss before the Joint 'ance. ' But the Alsops" account of brill 'hi: "'"■ is no ica.-on to suppose that their '"u lie.l.e.ji. al insight, or pretended psy- '''"'"'-'Heil insight, is any better, n ' would he surprising if Lewis , '"'aiiss hail not felt for Roberl Oppen- '1,'iln,... _ 1 .1 1.... I Ci ""Ill), i more love than hatred. Sir ,* 'Hoe years older. Both an- from the i,-'1'-! type ol American Jewish stock. J"1'1 are intellectual!) brilliant. Slrauss *5 an established greal man in business i "' governmenl: Oppenheimer was a '"•'Ilia,,, tar in science ami public re .I ""is. What could he- more natura 'liei '"' thai th,- ,-lele-r man should feel the "r""'s kindliness for lhe protege? o '"I how -hall the patron proceed il . Protege i- demonstrably nol trust- fj?'0) ? ihis does nol turn love to bat- ''• Bul it does turn hope to disappoint- '""nt. | '^">\e all. Lewis Slrauss is a patriot. j* ■ now-historic meeting of the AFC |e '''IT tin- minutes record thai Dr. j.obm F. Ba.li.'. stated thai "The for- Ji" distribution eef radioisotopes is rel- 'Ve') ;i -mall matter when compared with such major actions as lhe export of electric generators for use in connection with the Dneiperstroy Dam." "Mr. Strauss responded," the minutes continue, "thai the Atomic Energy Com- mission has no primary concern pertaining lo the export of gen era tors, hut added lhal lie jell lhal the government agencies thai did have jurisdiction should prevent such exports." Strauss is a formal man. vivacious hut collect. His gratuitous opinion in Commission meeting lhat other government agencies ought to get on lhe ball reflects lln- deep e em of an American for American interests. No one who knew as much about Roberl Oppenheimer as Lewis Slrauss did ami was as devoted to the national interest of lln- I nited Stales a- Lewis Strauss was could have been content in 1953 lo leave the enormous prestige of Robert Oppenheimer undisturbed. Oppenheimer did indeed bestride the narrow world of science-politics like a colossus. But Slrauss not only was no Cassius acting from dark motives, he was not a Brutus conspiring assassination from noble motives. Strauss simply discharged the responsibilities of his office in accordance with his oath of office, with,nil regard to whatever personal feelings hi' may have had toward Robert Oppenheimer. Every legal procedure was followed. Every means of determining ihe fads, interpreting lhe law. ami utilizing tlie judgment of men ,,l learning, experience, and high rep- iilalion was employed. If ever there was a case- where lhe decision was ineluctable, where no personal bias could off- sel the great weight of (be evidence, such was the Oppenheimer case. Il is hanlly ,le,cut to use a word much loved of the Alsops—to consider too curiously the personal emotions of the' figures in this national event. Yel speculations about these emotions have been thrust before lhe public. Il is therefore fair to observe thai the outcome of the Oppenheimer ease almost surely involved for Lewis Strauss the tragic sense ,il compassion in victory and the understanding thai so far from being able in acl upon two complementary codes of loyally, il is so hard lo live bv one that in oiiler to do il a man may have lo cut "IT his right hand. It is by no means lime lo write the Story of lhe development of alomie power. Much has been written and little said .en this subject. The atom-pow ei eel submarine Nautilus has been built. ground has been broken at Shipping- port for an atomic power plant, and other milestones bene been passed. The mosl significant announcements have hen made under Slrauss's chairmanship. Edward Teller, in this as in the II- ••'AC ?8 FORUM NEWS, March, MS bomb, was in lhe record early. In August 1947 Teller wrote to Lawrence Haf- slad: "The main thing is to prepare a few concrete plans, decide on one after proper consultation with people like Fermi, and then go ahead. This. I think. could he done in a few months. After that, one should go ahead with that one model even if il should turn out to be in lhe long run not lhe very best possible. The experience so gained will make up for any deficiencies. "Perhaps I am overenthusiastic bul I think lhal we have lots of good long- range plans—whal we really lack is the push toward short-range objectives, of which there was so much during the war. and of which there is so little' now. "The reason I am writing this letter. as you can guess, is my dismay brought aboul hv ihis situation: I sec five Navy men. unusually intelligent, and interested in a detailed, concrete and down-to- earth plan I if down-to-earth is a proper Navy objective), hut when I askeel them when and bow will they proceed. I am me! with hesitation thai seem,,I lo me to indicate lhal the whole thing is not at all approved as yet, and lhal il is perhaps being pul in the' same class as senile' of lhe- projects which in more ways than one' are- way up in the clouds." Compare tin' attitude' eif Robert Oppenheimer in June 1919 jusl ten days after he had testified before the Joint Committee in praise of David Lilienthal s management and in derogation of Lewis Slrauss's judgment on iseeleepc-. In an interview with lhe Oakland. California. Tribune, Oppenheimer "termed the' prospects of civil atomic power extremely remote and from any viewpoint extremely unimportant. "'Nuclear power for planes and battleship- is so much bogwash. I think the difficulties have hen underestimated.' "Civil power will lake a long lime, enormous investments of money and the all-out cooperation of industry, he said. adding 'if we can'l get there in twenty- five years we might as well lake il easy." " Like the H-bomb, atomic power at tin- end of World War II seemed lo a number of experts tei he just around the corner. But then for a number of years ii seemed lo gel farther off rather than nearer. Most discussions of atomic power in the years 1915-52 were like lhe K-25 plant al Oak Ridge gaseous diffusion in a glial vacuum. The statement was frequently made that security was the emergency brake we had left on. and that so Ion" as we bad il we could have no alomie power. This was a special form of what has often seemed the most telling argument against security the contention thai it obstructs scientific progress. This (Continued on Page H) Pasre 35 % f > j
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