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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 035. 1955-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/734.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 035. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/734

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 035, 1955-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/734.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 035
Transcript UNIQUE ROLE OF ADMIRAL STRAUSS by Medford Evans Former Chief of Training, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission Author of The Secret W ar for the A-Bonih atrs" I 1$ THE hard decisions that make history turn on lonely men who know what ''"'} have' tee elee leeeallse no one else •ml do it. [ nccrlainty needs collusion W comradeship, bul clear faith will go " alone. ;is David met Goliath, as Lindbergh flew Ihe Atlantic. Thc original do [Wt wait for thc approval of others. '"''eiusc they are sure of eternal company. Lewis L. Strauss is not an indispensable man. bul he has done, alone, sev- 5**1 indispensable things. The most dif- uculi wets simply putting in a word for ""' United Slates. Strauss was a Truman-appointed "nml.er of the five-man Atomic Energy '•'"omission from 1947 to 1950. As is ""u well known, he voted some twelve Hues against his colleagues in those r**rs, always on mailers involving lhe J*tlOnal security, and always resolving !'M'bls in favor of national security. ''* last ami greatest administrative bat- ,'' as Commissioner was bis dogged in- ~N|,'ii'e that lhe United States musl al ■J?8' 'T '" build a hydrogen bomb. ■"' Opposition be met cannot he meas- ""''I merely by lb,' AEC's l-l vole •gainst him on all the security issues 'Ari'l'l tlle ll-hi,nil., or the 3-2 vole on ,.at tin which Cordon Dean joined him). . 'he American atomic energy project "' *ose Mai- between World War II '''" Korea was alumst entirely dominat- , by a group of men of whom Robert Ppenheimer was lhe mosl energetic j".".1 intelligent. AFC Chairman David >>."'"thai was their bureaucratic chief, |!r"'H MiMahon their spokesman in '"tigress. Dean A,iicson their represen- '"'u' in the' Cabinet. They enjoyed the 'PPorl of an excellent administrative j^re, which included Carroll Wilson. ^K'l'h Volpe, Jr., ami Frances llendor- "'• Between Oppenheimer, Lilienthal. I ![! Acheson was lhal nonpareil of in- t. ''"'iiei' ami effective liaison Herbert S' Marks. C, "ei "operation fr prest anel i.'ls "early perfect. William I.. Laurence, ,';""■'"! W. Baldwin, and Walter l.ipp- ll'"1" were particularly important, bul corps of journalists in general y''''l'i those e,u the Chicago Tribune. ■/■'.'"' i ml. Daily Sens, ami Washington J."*' Herald wa- either s,,lid for or w,'''u on the subject of Lilienthal. To- ^"Oppenheimer they wen- obsequi- ■ I heir prompter was Eugene Rabin- LEWIS UCHTENSTEIJN STKAl "SS Horn, Charleston, West Virginia. January 31, 1896. Lewis S. and Rosa (Lichten- stein) Strauss. I ,liie eel,-,I. public schools. Kie liiiii.ee,I. Virginia. Employed by Herbert Hoover, 1917-19. With Kubn, Loeb mid Co., 1919-46. Partner, from 1929. Financial Adviser to Messrs. Hockefcller, 1950-53. National Service: V. S. Naval Reserve, 1926—: Hear Admiral, 1945—. Member, II.S. Atomic Energy C.om- mission, 1946-50. President's Adviser on Atomic Energy, 1953. Chairman, U.S. Atomic Energy Com- mission 1953-—. Awarded: Legion of Merit and (.old Star (Navy), Oak Leaf Cluster (Army) ; Commendalion Itililenee: Officer Legion of Honor (France). Se. I). Medical College of Virginia; LL. I). Jewish Theological Seminary, N.V.I!.: I..I1.I). Case Institute. owitch, Editor of lhe Hitlletin of lite Atomic Scientists, recognized by Time as "Voice of lhe Atom." To challenge this voice ami its ee hues in leading newspapers and magazines was to risk sounding like a crackpot. When "Ihe scientists who made' lhe bomb" had spoken, whal could a layman Bay? Science was supreme, and Science was international. Thus national considerations, such as lhe defense of lhe United Slates, were sordid. "The Commission," said Dr. Oppenheimer, "has balanced very carefully th, requirements of security and the requirements of progress and humanity.' But Lewis Slrauss did not accept an essential apposition between national security on the one hand and progress and humanity on the Other. Virginia-born, he inclined to take for granted whal lhe Hungarian genius Ed- waul Teller concluded analytically, lhat the security of lhe United Stales and lhal of all lhe freedom-loving people of tbe whole' world arc one. "I am nol an isolationist," Strauss told the Joini Committee on Atomic Energy in 191'). "and have never been. \s far back as 1916, 1 began my inler- esl in lhe welfare of human beings ir- ''ACT S FORUM NEWS, March, 1955 respective of na.'.onality. I served in lhe Belgian. French. German, Austrian, and Russian Relief. [He worked with Herbert Hoover.] I organized the relief fund for Finland when that country was attacked by Russia in 1939 . . . \ulionul security, however, as lone, as I am a manlier oj this Commission, must he my paramount responsibility." Of course no member of the Atomic Energy Commission could, even in 1949. have declared lhe contrary, but Slrauss was obviously quite serious, and thai was sometimes awkward. "Chairman Lilienthal has testified," Strauss continued, "thai there was only one Commissioner who bad dissented, and . . . mv recollection confirmed lhal thc Commission has always been unanimous except in those cases when I found myself in thc minority . . . .Ill of these dissents ileal with aspects of security and national defense." Twelve such dissent- were mailers of record when Strauss gave this testimony during the hearings in June' 19J9 on Senator Hick- enlooper's charges against David Lilienthal of "incredible mismanagement." Opinions mighl -till vary concerning lhe particular issues which impelled Lewis Strauss lo he. twelve times in two and a half years, a minority of one in a five-man Commission. But whatever thc merits of those cases, there is no el,.nl.I that the independent judgment s,e tested and tempered developed in Slrauss lhe toughness which carried him through ihe great H-bomb controversy. And if hi' hail nol been successful in lhat- the I nited States would be today considerably more vulnerable than il is. Nor is il at all clear licit the "requirements of progress ami humanity" would have been better met if Soviet Russia had had today bv our default a monopoly of H-bombs. II In any great project of applied science, scientists and nonscienlisls are thrown together. For most of thc nonscienlisls the scientists feel contempt or tolerance, bul they quickly recognize a few natural enemies, to-wit: politicians. accountants, ami security officers. Politicians rival scientists in influence, ac- countants limit their expenditures, and security officers interfere with their movements ami talk. Such restrictions implv that Science is nol sufficient. They must In' removed. Page 33 I
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