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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 010. 1955-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/709.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 010. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/709

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 010, 1955-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/709.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript —Wide World Photos Left photo, CIO President Walter Reuther congratulated Labor Secretary Mitchell (left) after the Cabinet member addressed the union's Dec. 7 convention. Standing at right, James Carey, President of the CIO Union of Electrical Workers. Right photo, Reuther (left) made headlines in 1937 when, as a UAW local president, he and Richard T. Frankensteen, UAW-CIO organizational director, were beaten up by employees at the Ford River Rouge plant whom they were trying to organize. earners in the I nited States bene improved continuously — not in ratio to union activity, but in ratio to the investment that private management has made in better plants and equipment.10 The basic e-vil of the compulsory union membership or union-shop idea is the use of force- lo compel individuals to do the will of olhers. Americans certainly have a right to organize unions and join them. They also have a righl to strike. Taking a job that is offered you, or quitting the one yon have; joining a union that wants you, or refusing to join — these are a pari of your inalienable rights to life, liberty, and thc pursuit of happiness. But no one, not even government, has the constitutional right to force someone else to join a union if he doesn't want to.9 Yet the instances of outright and outrageous violence on the part of organized labor hoodlums to force individual workers to join unions against their will or to participate in strikes which they do not approve of are almost infinite in number. Labor czars today can hold the people of the United States for ransom, cut off their Livelihood, starve them, and strangle their economy. In 1952. John L. Lewis decided lhal all the employed people in Widen, West Virginia — whether they worked in cafes, grocery stores, laundries, or whatnot— should belong to the I nited Mine Workers. The people resisted. So, in September. 1952, I MW pul a picket line- across ihe only automobile road leading into Widen, West Virginia. Ami there it remained until Christmas I've-. 1953. During those fifteen months the people of \\ iden, \\ esl \ irginia, lived in a reign of terror, instigated by a band ■ ef men who sought lo force them to sign up wilh the 1 MW, whether liny wanted tee or not. During this slrike-. three railroad bridges, two electric power substations, and <ene high-tension tower were destroyed by dynamite. Nine houses eer barns wen- biirneel. A train was stopped, its passengers removed at Page 8 gunpoint, and one of ils passengers beaten severely. Another passenger train loaded with women and children was fired on. Twenty-nine automobiles be- longing to individual citizens were overturned, shot up, or dynamited. The climax of this strike- was an ambush involving some twenty shotguns and rifles fired from darkness upon a motorcade on a public road. One man was killed, three wounded." Similar occurrences win- recorded in a prolonged strike ai Elizabeth, Louisiana, where an AF of L affiliate was trying to organize some paper mills.12 Similar incidents occurred in Central City, Kentucky. In 1951. George Leei independent owner of ;i small laundry in a little town in Louisiana, tried to resist lln- efforts of a powerful union lo organize his employees, who didn't want lee be organized. The union pul a pie kit around his place, insulted his customers with obscene language-, heal up his truck drivers, refused lo let his employees go to work.11' I nion goons in Chicago waylaid and be-at lei death an elderly man for refusing lee participate in ;i strike which In- considered unjust. ABOVE AND BEYOND THE LAW lhe list of such incidents is long and terrifying. Yet, because of ihe political power they possess, the big labor organizations have1 been placed above and beyond the laws of our land. The instigators and perpetrators of all this criminal violence ait- seldom brought 1° justice fen their crimes. When they are, they are usually given suspended sentences or light fines. Even more startling is the fail tha' sen b arrant hoodlumism is seldom ,-rili- eizi'd by lhe great liberal church leaders- newspapers, and various civil rights or- ganizations which look upon themselvefl as the keepers of the nation's conscience. It is a situation which defies understanding. But one thing we can understand: if the people of America cootim"' to appease industry-wide union lab*« monopolies, their appeasement will cii'f either in civil war or in lhe submission of the United Slates government to an unofficial labor dictatorship.5 Our presidents, our cabinet officer* our congressmen, and our senators hav'' been so susceptible to the powerW political pressures of the big unions til'1' lhe federal government has been niial* to regulate labor-management affairs i" tin- national interest. The only way °" of this dilemma is lo permit the po"1'' of regulation to return lo the indiv idu* slates, where il should have been :1 along, according lo the- Tenth Amen* ment of our Constitution. The real importance of (he right-10- work laws which lhe individual Stat* are enacting is that such laws an- '' turning to the individual states the f'"."" I inn of policing labor-management vl" lence. The people of Florida started ''"' trend ill 1911. STATES ADOPT OWN LAWS Arizona followed soil in 1916. Sin1''' that lime, fifteen other stales in l'" South and West have adopled their 0** right-to-work laws. —Wide World p ^ At Pittsburgh during power strike in 1946, regular heat supply was cut off. Chilly fe building offices were warmed up by heating system pipes connected with locomotive. Be and page Al" FACTS FORUM NEWS, March, *5 I her, ' a V "l)„
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