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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 008. 1955-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/707.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 008. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/707

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 008, 1955-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/707.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript RECEPTION ROOM Committee on UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES —Wide World Pholo Lee Pressman as he arrived for questioning during closed hearing in 1948. A former government lawyer, he was secretary of the Wallace third party platform committee. Page 6 ity arrange-in,-nts as the closed shop had been in force for twenty to thirty years when they were outlawed by the Taft- Hartley Act. And in many cases, union- shop and closed-shop agreements have been championed by employers, as well as by unions. Many employers, as well as students of industrial relations, agree lhal closed- shop or union-shop agreements contribute tee responsible unionism and result in benefits to management. Responsible unionism can develop onlv to the extent that the union feels see-,ire-, lhal ils peesilieni is not being altaeked or undermined. Under closed-shop it union-shop conditions lln- union is not compelled to spend its major efforts mi continuous organizing drives within Ihe plant. The union under such conditions can concentrate ils attention on collective bargaining and cooperate wilh management for tin- mutual benefit of the workers and lhe company. Instead eef a national policy thai would permit unions and employers to negotiate union-security provisions freely, the Taft-Hartley law permits arrangements for union security anil then authorizes lhe stales lo outlaw these- pin visions. CALLS FOR NATIONAL POLICY If "right-to-work" laws were adopted by all the stales, there could be forty- nine different laws affecting union security: the federal law and forty-eight state laws. Yet union security is an issue thai clearly e-alls for a national policy, since labor-management relations are coil- line leel will, national firms that buy and sell in the national market and operate establishments in several states. Consider lhe disruption of industrial relations created by "right-to-work" laws as they affect union-management relationships in multiplanl firms. The union and lln- company negotiate a master agreemenl covering all the firm's establishments. Both parties agree to a union- security provision, lint if one of the plants is in a "right-to-work' state, the union-security provision is inoperative in that state. A multiplanl company mav operate under a union-shop pr.ev isieen in il- New York. Michigan, Ohio, and Illinois plants. But in its Texas, Alabama, and Virginia plants, all forms of union security an- outlawed by state legislation. A national economy requires national economic [>,>1 i< i,—. To atomize collective bargaining through the Taft-Hartley \< i and state "right-to-work" laws is tee resin,in trade nnieens a,,,] business firms from functioning properly within a national e-eieneimv elependenl on interstate commerce anel multiplanl companies. The selection of union scairitv lee, spce-ial restrictions under a eombimilion '•I federal and state lave a is an obv ions attempt to undermine collective bargain ing. This policy on union securiH clearly stems from an antilabor bias- regardless of how it is cloaked. The claims of high principle 9 "right-to-work" laws have no basis i" fact. These laws have but one sing'1 minded aim: the undermining of iini°" strength by disrupting effective couw live- bargaining eiml atomizing industry relations. That was one side. Now comes the opposite side — arguments of some who DO NOT agree with Secretary of Labor Mitchell lhal slate right-to-work laws do more harm than good. Tin: best way to defend lhe statj right-to-work laws is lo explain WW they were needed. The- best explanation is a brief review of historical fads. . In 1935, lhe Wagner Ad wa to the American public as lhe law win' would give- labor equality of bargain'"; power wilh industry. Bul thai was "'' lln- real purpose of Lee Pressman, "' Communisl who drafted the law Wagner Act was a Communisl mcasllr Ils purpose was lo make labor uni"" powerful enough lo dictate terms lo jf government of the United Slates. I'' Communists hoped to capture l'"' unions and use them al the appropfl time In spearhead the revolution "' establish the dictatorship of the Y'" letariat." The country was neel as ripe' I revolution as the Communists imagi".1'' however, and the real growth of un>', power did not conic until World War when Ihe government, controlling lie-ally all industry, forced most "<■'.' industrial establishments to negoti' closed-shop contracts with the ' unions. Literal!) hundreds of thoiisa11' ol fanners, day laborers, small busing', men from the South. Southwest and •"', west, who could m,I gel into the a.^' gave- up their occupations and moved j Detroit or the Easl Coasl or lhe "l, Ceeast to help the war effort by "".', ing in defense plants. The firsl th* the) had to ele, there, however, wa*, join one of the big unions. "'''T,, they liked it or not. Money was l»* out ,if their paychecks for initiation > / and monthly dues. If they protested "a high-handed tyranny, the unions tffl remove them from their jobs and I''?/,, ball tlii-in in the entire industry. " -, could gel no help from their ' ment, because government was "" , union's side. Local and s|„|e ?°v.n< ments fell thai they could do n"1'1' ' eir were loo timid lo liv . (| \- World War II came to a close. I labor leaders saw thai the end ' war mighl also be lhe end of th1''1' , prerogatives. The terrible onlbn'" |V nalieinw iele- strikes and v iolence tl"1 curred righl after World War H I monopolistic labor's bid for final I"' FACTS FORUM NEWS, March, Pulso SB '"A,-,
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