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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955
File 005
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 005. 1955-03. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/704.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-03). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 005. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/704

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955 - File 005, 1955-03, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/769/show/704.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 3, March 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date March 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript manslup and courage-. We could, first °' all, a,lo],i a constitutional amendment limiting federal taxation to 25 per cent of individual incomes. This would cllininale the worsl evil in our present system- the- Communisl principle of Sfaduated rates — and it would compel lne governmenl to economize. Governmenl -imply wj]| not ,.,,i ,,,,1 wasteful and dangerous spending unless II has to. we would put a limit on the governments power to tax, your governmenl ould have to slop giving your monej lvay to foreign governments, spending '0ur money on housing stuilii'S in .. "<■■'■ anel publishing brochures on lhe "e histories of North American wood- "arhlers." **e could also adopt an amendment making it illegal for lhe federal govern- 'it to compete in business wilh its !'u" citizens. This would eliminate Untless socialistic enterprises on which Uoney has ben squandered for many v„lr.s ' We hail these two amendments as ^ginning, we could cut the federal -^'■riimciit back to legitimate size. f'Ml"l il- activities to valid and legal /""'""is. ami make substantial inroads ,||| "'"ing lhe national debt. We could ./'!' repeal ihe Income Tax Amen,I,noil r.", rem°ve forever the possibility of the '''"T-,1 „ ■ I e • . "' governmenl s embarking on s,!,'.' ,'.'r l,ilrr>' Hopkins orgy e.l' taxing. ' "'bug. and electing. ***** on,, Was one *'de- Now comes the "liosit,, Bide — arguments of some l"" I)0 N0T think lhal lhe Income ' * Amendment should he repealed. I K "lea of repealing the Income Tax j^nendmenl is preposterous. _"niting the federal government's r to levy taxes would place such a fiscal slrail jacket on the- government lhat it could nol meet lhe grave crises of depression, inflation, and threats of war. Every other major government on earth has the freedom to raise taxes as needed to nice! national emergencies. How could our government compete or even survive — in lhe present world of continuing international tensions if its hands were tied — if its most vital power (the laving power) were limited?" When the Sixteenth Amendment was proposed, lhe country voted for it because il permitted the most equitable kinel eif tax possible. Il has enabled us lo create a modern tax system, based on the principle lhal people should be taxed according lo their ability lo pay. The argument that the progressive income tax has hurl lhe country is ridiculous. The gross naiiien.il product almosl doubled between 1939 ami tin- first half of 1951. rising from 179 billion dollars le, 324 billion dollars. Employment rose from 16 million lo 62 million. Weeklj wages in manufacturing increased about in prr cent. Corporate profits rose from five billion dollars lo 18 billion dollars.1 ' PEOPLE JUST WORK HARDER High tax rates do not reduce incentive. When taxes are high, people work harder and assume greater risks in order lo maintain a given standard of living. If a man pays a lax of 20 per cent, he must increase hi- income in order lee have the same take-home pay he would have without taxes. Obviously, a man will work harder when he has to meet larger obligations whether they are a new car, a television set. a new baby, or higher taxes. He will aim al a standard of living which se-e-ms right to him. and «^6si* -Wide World Photo lr,f,'Jn9 into i sennower distributed souvenir pens to congressional leaders Aug. 16 after (B *° riot,, y tne new rQx hill granting reductions to many. Witnessing the ceremony were, l»" ■'• R» ' S,yles Brid9« (R-N.H.l. Rep. Dan Reed (R-N.Y.), seated; Rep. Leo Allen uV,Us°n Id '. JosePn VV. Martin (R-Mass.l, Rep. Leslie Arends (R-lll.). Sen. Homer "Secre, •'• Sen- Levere'' Saltonstall (R-Mass.l, Rep. Charles Hailed, (R-lnd.l. orY of the Treasury Marion Folsom. and Sen. Eugene Millikin (R-Colo.l. "Act x !■■ °RUM NEWS, March, —Wide World Photo Harry Hopkins (right) shown as he talked with reporters in Washington, D.C., prior to reporting to President Truman on his mission to Moscow. Hopkins' trip to Russia was as the President's special emissary. he- will work to achieve and maintain ii. I lie- fad that lhe nation's output has double,I during lhe past ten years proves lhal individuals ami corporations carry een economic activities at high levels of efficiency even if taxes arc heavy,1" I he opponents of the Income lax Amendment argue' lhal il lends to discourage production. .Nothing could be farther from the truth. Not only do the revenues eli-rive-d from the income' lax enable lhe government lo be Ihe largest single consumer, which makes more jobs; bul lhe availability of these re- sources allows the government to control lhe economy in .-nil, a way as lo avoid lhe- nlil "boom and bust ' lhat used lo plague our system. Tin- largest consumer, following scientific principles, can keep our economy running on an ,wi'ii keel ami can maintain a constant high level of prosperity. The conditions existing at the lime of lhe Declaration of Independence and of lie- framing of the Constitution have vanished. Prior to 1900. Americans could afford lo be "rugged individualists"; bul ih'- Industrial Revolution brought in its wake such a highly interdependent seeeie-lv thai the rights of society became more important than the rights of the individual. Society has the' righl lo protest when one man amasses great wealth while other men starve-. Seicii'iv has the duly of protecting itself and its members againsl ihe economic anarchy eef a greedy few. Society grants to ihe- individual equal rights with all other individuals, but requires him to exercise those rights as a responsible member eef society.1" Tin- w heeli' is greater than lhe sum (Continued on Pug,- 63) Page 3 'a I
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