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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 059. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/58.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 059. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/58

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 059, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/58.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 059
Transcript VtBBaVBBaVH attention to it. Now, is it that civil defense is not dramatic in the minds of the newspaper reporters, or of the people, or what is it? And do you think it has to be dramatized more than it has been to date? Huebner: No. I think again you run into a problem which deals with all Americans and I think the news media are just as guilty of so-called apathy as anyone else. The great majority of the news media have not had time or have not taken time to become educated in the elements of this new age. Therefore, thev do not write from a comprehensive background. And those who have written know that a story that is not written from a comprehensive background generally does not carry much with il and that certainly it doesn't seek its place in the limelight where it really belongs. BURT: Well, now, General Huebner, let me ask you the sixty-four billion dollar question, and I hope that our panel members will all join in on this discussion because it is the nub actually of what we are talking about. If a surprise attack should be launched by the Communists would our civil defenses be adequate? Huebner: Absolutely not. We in New York State have a good basic organization. Every city and every county in the state does have a civil defense director and does have its staff. Most of them have some of the services already organized and operating. There's nearly enough of them to do the job. However, I can say this: that if we were attacked nnw we would he much better able to proceed and do some of the things that vve should have done than we would have- been two years ago. Combs: It occurs to me that until Washington decides that this question of civil defense spreads across stale lines, that it is not a matter to be handled as Mrs. Hobby handled polio on the theory that the polio virus wouldn't cross state lines, thai we are licked altogether in this entire problem. This is a national problem, one of national scope, and cannot he succcessfully handled by stale nr local administrations no matter how competent they may be. Look at New York for example. Our water supply in large part comes from a confluence of rivers in another state. How are we going to safeguard New York water againsl contamination on a purely local basis? All of these problems have national and geographical implications which go beyond the archaic political subdivisions of the forty-eight states. And until we recognize the urgency of a federated and a controlled, and may I say, a centralized civil de- fense, we're jusl ailing as if we had forty-eight different state militias. We Wouldn't fight war with forty-eight state militias. We can'l fight civil defense with forty-eight state . . . Buckley: I ihink General Huebner's remark thai wc need to rely a bit more on American ingenuity is a highly apposite one. For example, I remember that Michael DiSalle, when he was —Wide World Photo President Eisenhower walks beside Arthur Fleming, Defense Mobilization Director, as he leaves a cabinet meeting at a secret retreat during "Operation Alert," a simulated atomic attack on the U.S. A secret service man and an unidentified aide follow the chief executive as he walks past a tent at the site. mayor of Cleveland, suggested to the Chamber of Commerce, that he could solve Cleveland's problem with ten thousand dollars. All he had to do was erect tremendous neon arrows, one pointing at Chicago and one pointing at Detroit. This kind of ingenuity which springs from allowing local people to handle the local problem is the anti- slatist response to questions like this. Incidentally, in this connection, talking about federalizing everything, I would submit that Washington, after all, is in very little danger since it would be inconceivable that the Soviet Union would elect to erase Washington from any possible future use and lose the State Department. HODGES: Nothing is inconceivable. COMBS: Congress apparently couldn't even respond to the last civil defense test. Hodces: I want to suggest how important civil defense is in this particular state. And particularly for those of you who are thinking in parochial stale lines. I have read with greal interest the contacts lhal are being made with Canada. Mr. Moderator, through General Huebner's foresight. I think it's a most important document. And I regret it hasn't gotten wider distribution. BURT: You're disagreeing with Mr. Combs, then, in saying this civil defense administration handled on a local and state level is doing a good job and if isn't necessary to have it truly operated by the federal government? Hodges: Well. I think that you've got lo lie the whole thing from community right up to Washington together. We have to work as a team and 1 think we have lo bring in our northern neighbor, Canada, very decidedly, as General Huebner's organization has done according to the record. Huebner: I would like to say that each echelon of American government has its responsibility in civil defense. Actually the work will be done where the disaster occurs. Then you come to the state, and the state through its own cabinet is responsible to the people of lhe state for the coordination of civil defense. And finally you get up to the federal government who retains unto itself most of the taxing powers. It too is responsible for coordinating the efforts of the states and where it's beyond the ca- pacity of the stales, either through inter- stale lines nr inability to raise the money. then it becomes the responsibility of the Congress and of lhe executive department of the government. Now, I don't go at all for this business of having the federal government appoint a state admin- istrator. I would rather serve under my own governor and his cabinet than I would to have a political appointee come in here and tell us all what our jobs are. BURT: General Huebner, we have very little time left, and I want to ask you a question that I certainly have in mind since I da live in New York and many of our viewers would have that in mind. Manhattan is a tightly-packed little island of millions of people. What would happen, how could it be evacuated, in case of atomic attack? Huebner: In my opinion, in case of an atomic attack, if you think in terms of an hour or two, it is an impossible task. Bul when lhe diplomatic situation gets to the point where war is possible. and we have a big intelligence group whose sole job is just that, then the powers that be must bring about a strategical evacuation. People who are (Continued on Page fill PACTS FORUM NEWS, October, 1955 Page 57
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