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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
File 058
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 058. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/57.

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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 058. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/57

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 058, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/57.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 058
Transcript It's contradictory to lhe American—I think, the man in the street. The second thing I'd like to point out. Mr. Moderator, is the fact that vve deal more and more with an unstable population where the neurotic reaction . . . Buckley: Don't look at me. Hodces: ... the fear—(that's all right. Bill. I had no implication whatsoever in my look. I was appealing to you for support)—where the neurotic reaction is a real problem. And I think that's going to lead—and I'll look at the General, if I may—to the problem of panic and what arc we going to do with a population which is half-informed and half-stricken by fear? Huebner: I would like to say that civil defense is the fourth arm of national defense and that it takes a long time to build the military and to develop it and to keep abreast of the modern age. And here we suddenly find ourselves with the civilian in the Defense Department. It is going to take lime. education, clear thinking, and a lot of training to fit him in his modern role. BURT: To make him aware of the potentialities of the danger and peril of this atomic attack. Let's go on to our second question and, General Huebner, perhaps you would do us the honor of answering this first, also. Is the danger of atomic war minimized by the current Soviet peace offensive in your opinion, sir? Huebner: I would think not. because war in itself is a long range problem. And the Soviets have always held their objective high. They may deviate along the way. They may go this way, they may go that way. But the ultimate objective of communism is to dominate the world . . . Burt: Conquest of capitalism. Huebner: Thai's right. Now maybe thev think time is working for them and certainly I think we need some time, too. Combs: I think the danger of atomic war may be deferred by the current Soviet peace offensive but certainly not minimized. If we are talking in terms of perhaps the next year or two it would seem that the period of negotiations will probably delay any sharpening of the crisis . . . BUCKLEY: Like Pearl Harbor? Cdvibs: I would not suggest that the presenl negotiations would be a prelude to a Pearl Harbor. I rather doubt il because I don'l believe that Russia is any better prepared in civil defense than we are. It would seem to me. however, that this whole question does in a very real way impede the American effort to prepare or organize civil defense, he- e .ui-i- we are a little -anguine that maybe some magic formula will be evolved from all of these things which vv ill banish or dispel the danger of atomic war. and therefore we lag in our civilian defense preparations. It would occur to me that we would he much stronger in military and diplomatic posture if now we could confront Russia with a really well-organized, well-mobilized civil de- fense program which would indicate our inviolability from any attack that they might launch against us. BURT: Well, in brief, you don't believe that the Soviet Communist empire has deflected from its 37-year-old aim of conquering the world? COMBS: No, I don'l. not for one moment. They might reach a temporary ac- commodation, a modus vivendi of some sort. But il certainly doesn't reach the root of the problem. 1Iihii.es: I think the Soviet peace offensive is a le'ed political danger in the scum' lhat il throws us off guard. I ihink the .American people with their honest desire for peace, are gning to be caught. The Soviet game is undoubtedly to squeeze us againsl the sentiment nf our allies so that we'll be forced into, I Gen. C. R. Huebner would repeat, lowering our guard. I think that's the real danger of this thing. There's another aspect of it. too. If ibis whole problem of civil defense is effectively answered so that the cost of an atomic war becomes higher and higher we may get this uneasy coexistence, but it will never come through the diplomats and talky-talk and that sort of thing. It will come because we're too tough lo crack both on the mililarv and the civilian fronts. I think that's the basis of it. BUCKLEY: I ihink that it's nonsense to talk about reaching inviolability, as George Combs has been referring to it. I think inviolability is inherently im- possible. Huebner: I agree with that. BUCKLEY: Surely what we're talking about here is how to minimize what will just the same he catastrophic damage inflicted on us if we engage in a nuclear weir, which is nol to sav that the peace offensive minimizes this possibility. And my feeling is lhat ii definitely maximizes it because the Soviet Union will pre- dictively move into a siluation that has been softened. And the whole purpose of the peace offensive is to soften it. It was Lenin himself whn defined peace as that situation which exists when the enemy has been conquered. And we are the enemy. We'll continue In be the enemy jusl so long as we oppose the imperialism of the Se >x iel 1 nion. BURT: Mr. Buckley, let me ask you one question. In your opinion do you believe that the current peace offensive is going to make it very much more difficult to get the American people to do something about their own civil defenses? Buckie, : Well. vis. because after all, the American people have gut to hang onto every crumb of information that is passed down to them from the bureaucracy. And these crumbs of informal inn say such things as that we are emerging into a long period nf peaceful coexistence. Harry Truman says that the cold war is about over and so on. with lhe result that they probably look at people like- General Huebner and think lhal he's a real paranoiac urging them lo take all kinds of precautions . . . Hodges: That's a nasty name for a nice man. isn't it? BURT: Well, there's one question which does arise here and I'd like to pose it for General Huebner, It seems an awfully difficult thing to get the people—any people— to be on the alert, say, for a period of four or five, six, seven, eight or nine or ten years for a blow that might come but never does. How can you keep them psychologically alert, General Huebner? Huebner: I think that can be handled in this way—you know every child under fifteen years old has live-el its entire life nf reason in the atomic age. It's a new period that we're going into. And in order to have proper civil defense we have lo organize on a grass roots level because therein lies the operation of civil defense what ihey do in the cities and in the country, lhe little people. Now if appointed and elected officials take their part and assume the leadership that they should assume in civil defense. then you get this basic organization and once vou have lhat, then whatever your mood or whatever the action vmi have to take you have a foundation from which you can move-, ami will probably do a very good job. American ingenuity is slill here. Hodces: I'd like to throw in this one observation. I Ihink that whal General Huebner is urging is civil responsibility right down to each one' nf us. Bul on the other hand, in order to exercise ihis responsibility we have to put up the money. That's a real problem in terms of civil defense. BURT: Well, doesn't this fit into the question I'd like also to pose for General Huebner: I noticed recently when it was announced in the press that fifteen thousand people—key government officials—would be evacuated from Washington in a civil defense test, including the White House staff and the President of the United States, that the newspapers literally, for the size and for the importance of that story, paid very little Page 56 FACTS FORUM NEWS, October, 1955
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