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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
File 056
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 056. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/55.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 056. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/55

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 056, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/55.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 056
Transcript committees. The information and experience which industry has to offer can still be obtained in this way. The country will not suffer from it. but we shall remove from each and every one this suspicion that otherwise is likely to attach. Views of Colonel Owsley: Should the administration employ "dollar a year men" in policymaking positions in peacetime has Income a highly controversial question. The pol- icy of using men whose salaries arc paid by industry in positions of decision in the government arose as a wartime emergency. It was the patriotic thing to do, for industry to loan their top executives without pay from the government, lo win the war. Government business has become highly technical. The question arises: If it is the summit of patriotism to serve the government and the country in times of war without pay, how much more important is it that those "indispensable men of industry" who have the know-how- shall serve the public interest in time of peace to prevent war? The naton's safety and defense is at stake. The yearning of every American is for peace with honor. We can only have peace if we are strong and powerful, so strong that no enemy dare attack us. The man on the street knows that the only reason we have not been attacked by our enemies. the Communists, is our possession of the atomic bomb and the H-bomb, with the overwhelming power and force that goes with il for lutal destruction. These developments did not come altogether from government employees. They came largely from the men from the research laboratories of our great industries. It is imperative to have the besl brains of the country serving the nation to prevent war or, in the event of hostility, to win the victory. I refuse to define this question as one of public service versus private interest. Now there were many "dollar a year men" in World War II, and at thc close of the Korean War there was something like a thousand "key men of industry," who knew their business, serving in Washington without government pay. No scandals, no betrayal of interest. Only one conflict has arisen from high authority, and he had the character to resign his public office. All praise to him for this correct decision. In the final summation of this question, it is true we are searching for men of character, honesty, patriotism who cannot be swerved out of the line of duty. It is common knowledge that senators and members of the House, and high government officials maintain private connections from which they draw incomes, such as radio and television lecture contracts, the direction of their home newspapers, connection with their law firms and many other businesses, too numerous to mention. Yet who is there in America to say that the ranking mem bers of Congress or high government officials should be compelled to impoverish themselves because "some people" fear they would favor special groups in Washington. The country's thinking has risen above that level. Business or no business in government? This is lhe question. The problem, of course, of how to draw the line between personal interest and official government responsibility is far from solved. We are supposed In have a government of business men. That's what thc President said he wanted. The people overwhelmingly endorsed his poliev of having a governmenl by business men. How can you have a government by business men unless you can bring the business men In Washington? The majority of these men are drawing salaries fa]- beyond lhat which lhe governmenl pays and they cannot afford the sacrifice of giving up their high salary from private industry and. in many cases, le.as of seniority, be deprived of their retirement programs, stock purchasing rights or profit sharing bonuses which have now become the rule wilh large industry. We must not exacl loo high a price, too great a sacrifice of the besl bretins of the country or else we cannot expect them to serve. There are restrictions—laws prohibiting men owning and retaining interests when drafted by governmenl service. The nation is entitled lo the faithful services of the best men emd women available, regardless of who pays the salaries. .cfefsl Book Reviews EJ37bLtl (Continued from Page 52) of war as the means to combat cruel slavery by no means connotes continuation of a foreign policy designed to perpetuate in power a brutal Communisl dictatorship. And we should most carefully refrain from letting ourselves be propagandized and manipulated into lending assistance to the Kremlin rulers everv lime the excesses, brutality and utter failure of their Communist system get them into hot water. There is a very considerable probability that the form of insanity known as communism could not for long hulil sway over its op- pressed millions without the lavish help it has so frequently obtained from the West. Here Mr. Huddleston's observations on "constructive" criticism are particularly apropos. We don't have to do any- Pa^e ~i£ thing. We just have to stop doing the wrong thing. We can turn deaf ears to those who have consistently, year after year, urged upon us policies which have aided lhe Kremlin rulers—and have then justified their false counsel on the ground that the evil and tragic results were inevitable. It is not even necessary for us to ask why these counselors have- been so persistently and disastrously wrong, provided their counsel is ignored. Bul politicians listen to Ihe loudesl clamor in the so-called "media of information," and this is "Popular Diplomacy" in action. Does anyone seriously believe that strict abstinence from any support of the Communist regime would provoke war? And is it not more logical to suppose that the Communist empire, shut off from outside help and confirmation, would face the dissolution inevitably resultant from an abandonment of all moral values of decency and common humanity? Faced with the internal fruits of the Communisl system, the Kremlin rulers would be in a poor position lo consider external war. Military defeat of Soviet Russia would not destroy lhe false premises of communism. Ii must destroy itself, bul for this to happen we must Iel it fail. Not until then will we be able lo carry on any meaningful international relations with the elected representatives of almost a billion people who have had no representation at Geneva, at the UN, or anywhere else in the world. It is not our business to "liberate" these people. Bul any amoral policy which frustrates for one day llieir self- liberation can buy us nothing but the reward of an accomplice. Popular Diplomacy and War offers helpful insighl on how we eem follow a path which will avoid another destructive war. Main of Mr. Huddleston's proposals would help us avoid supporting an evil form of physical and mental slavery. Much more' needs tn be written to combat lhe pre sent tendency toward ihis second form of erroneous lieitieuial conduct. It is the issue now coming in for increasing discussion. There is no more In be gained from moral self- destruction than frnm physical self-destruction. (Continued mi Pagi ' FACTS FORUM NKWS. Octobei
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