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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
File 055
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 055. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/54.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 055. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/54

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 055, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/54.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 055
Transcript Does $100 a year allow... LOYA over Senator John Sparkman, Democrat, Alabama, and Colonel Alvin Mansfield Owsley, attorney, diplomat, soldier and business executive, are tlie exponents of differing philosophies on the use of industry-paid employees in governmental policymaking positions in peacetime. The Senator and the Colonel present thought-provoking arguments on both sides of this controversial suhjeci on a Facts Forum radio program. Views of Senator Sparkman: Should the government use industry- paid employees in policymaking positions in peace time? My answer is no. I In- government, which is the agent and representative of all of the people of the United States, is entitled to the undivided loyalty of each of its employees. No government employee should be in a position where his private interests make il difficult for him to act solely on Ihe basis of public interest. No business would retain an employee whose interests were different from those of his firm. No person would retain ei lawyer who represented the other side of a case. W by should the government, unless il In- iii time of ei national emergency, il ever, \ieileiie this sound principle? This rule has for years been set Forth in the criminal laws of the country and a number of statutes called the conflict of interest laws. Among these is one which prohibits a government employee from acting for the governmenl in transacting business with a firm in which he is interested. Another prohibits a gov- i-riiiiie-ni employee from receiving a salary from any private person or firm 'or his work for the governmenl. I've heard of no suggestion lhat these statutes should be repealed. On the contrary, the general view in the pei~t few Years has been that these conflict of interest laws should be strengthened. So II came as rather a surprise lhat the '"'ministration urged a further extension of an exemption From these con- •hct of interest laws which weis made at lhe time of the Korean war solely ■ or emergency purposes. Only one Re- FACTS FORUM NEWS, October, 1955 publican senator voted to discontinue this questionable practice. The exemption was originally granted only because of the overriding importance of national security. In time of war or full mobilization the entire civilian economy is placed under rigid controls in order to support the military. Rationing, price and wage controls, allocations of materials and equipment, all foreign to our normal way of life, are necessary and have to be carried out. To mobilize the civilian economy and administer all these many controls, thousands of government employees are needed and they must have a thorough knowledge of industrial and commercial practices and problems. Thus, it seems reasonable in a national emergency in call on industry to help supply capable, experienced men. Also, in time of war lhe influence of patriotic motives, a desire to preserve lhe nation from armed attack, reduces to the minimum the influence of the man's conflicting private interests. When the period of full mobilization is over, when lhe influence of patriotic feu tors lessens, we should return to the regular rules of peacetime. In order lo give you an idea of the kind of situation thai eem come before these industry-paid employees where their loyalties tu their firms may conflict with their duly to the governmenl eunl the' public, Iel me give yuu an example in the aluminum and magnesium division of the Department of Commerce. Lasl summer, 1954. the government was trying lo dee iele whether to undertake an expansion in the aluminum industry. The question was whether the production of the industry would be enough to take care of military requirements, stockpile requirements and the nta-el~ of business, including small independent fabricators. The head of the aluminum and magnesium division in the Commerce Department was a paid representative of, and expected to return to, one of the large aluminum companies. Lfnder his leadership, the aluminum and magnesium division recommended against the expansion of the aluminum industry. Because of this recommendation the expansion program did not go through. By January. 1955, small business weis finding it difficult to get aluminum and bv the third quarter of 1955 it was necessary lo suspend deliveries to the stockpile in order to leave enough aluminum for business. It may be necessary to suspend them again for the fourth quarter. It may be that a full-time salaried employee would have reached the same conclusions as the aluminum company representative. But suspicion is bound to arise that this man opposed the expansion and brought about thc rejection because his company and his industry opposed an expansion, preferring instead increased profits on the same volume of business instead of increased production. I do not say this happened, but room is there for the suspicion always in a case such as this. In peacetime we should use full-time salaried governmenl employees whose sole loyalty is to the public and to the public interest, who have no problem of distinguishing between llieir private interest and llieir public duty. Industry can still supply advisors and advisory Page 53
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