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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
File 051
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 051. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/50.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 051. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/50

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 051, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/50.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 051
Transcript Tariff protection for American jobs is very definitely one of the potential weak spots in the security and prosperity of our nation. PATRIOTIC DUTY REQUIRES STAYING INFORMED The discharge of your patriotic duly as citizens presents a problem that is different from the discharge of your personal duties because it requires that you maintain an alert, intelligent interest in public affairs. Specifically, this means reading and. in some cases, studying the issues that will come before you as voters. This includes, of course, local and state issues as well as national and international issues. Here again duty should be made into a habit—and in this case, the habit consists of reading regularly one or more good news magazines which report the importanl events and supply simple explanations of their significance. Radio and television are helpful in keeping up with the news, but they cannol lake the place of the printed page. In the beginning, like anything else. you may find the conscientious reading of a good news magazine, week in and week out, somewhat of a chore, but if you stick with it, you will find yourself enjoying it. You will also find that you become more important persons in the eyes of your friends and associates because you will be asked to give the final word in many discussions where the subject is belter known to you than to the others. and it will broaden your horizon and increase your pleasure in life in many ways that you never expected. A PERSONAL OBLIGATION I would like to point out the origin of our personal duties. In a spiritual sense, they can be traced back to the Ten Commandments and to our recognition of the Supreme Being. In a human sense, they become a moral obligation for us to leave the world a little better place than it was when we came into it. We assume this obligation out of respect and affection for those who lived before us and in the interests of those who will live after us. Although making the world a better place is a very difficult achievement, lhe means by which it is accomplished is a very simple one: all it requires is thai people become better people. All human affairs, even those that appear hopelessly complicated, revolve around individual people. America will become a better nation only as its 160 million people become better people. There is no large scale magical method of making people better: each person must do it for himself—each of you must do it for yourself. eLLZ/bUi uniform anehor- The People's Pottage By Garet Garrett. The Caxton Printer*. Ltd., Caldwell. Idaho. 1953, 174 pp.. $3.00. "There are those who still think they are holding the pass against a revolution that may be coming up the road. But they are gazing in the wrong direction. The revolution is behind them. It went by in the Night of Depression, singing songs to freedom." These were the opening words of The Revolution Was, written in 1938 and the lirsi ,ef three pe-nii reeling monographs by Caret Garrett. Next came Ex America, written in 1951. Then Mr. Garrett wrote: "About 1900 began the llowering of that alien graft upon our tree of sapience called the intellectual. He was the precious product of our free, academic world—a social theorist who knew more than anybody else about everything and all about nothing, especially how to subvert the traditions and invert the laws, lb was neither creative nor inventive; therefore there was no profit for him in the capitalistic scheme, and his revenge was to embrace Old World socialism. As a teacher, writer of textbooks, master of the popular diatribe of discontent, he was primarily a sower of conrrarious ideas. Living comfortably "ii tin- fringe uf capitalistic opulence, he compared his income with that of a bond salesman or a self-made executive and was moved to scorn the profit Consult your hookstore for books reviewed here—or lerite lo publishers listed. motive and trample upon private wealth. "In Ihe academic world this disaffected intellectual multiplied by fission. One made two, two made four, and so on. Their superior manners and university passports caused them to be re- ceived in lhe houses of lhe rich, where they dined on fine plate and denounced success. Standing on the eastern seaboard they gazed dotingly on Europe, w liicli. thev said, was twenty years ahead eef Vmerica in social consciousness. . . . "And so it was that after 1900 we began to import political ideas from Europe. This was reversal. Until then for more than one hundred years En- rope had been taking ideas from us— ideas of liberty from the Declaration of Independence, ideas of limited government from our Constitution, and then. though very dimly, the idea that wages wen- paid mil mil of profits bul out of production, which meanl that profits and wages could rise together, provided only you went on expanding production. "Bill now. from ihe intellectual's transmission bell, we began lo take ideas from Europe—ideas of social security from Germany, ideas of slow socialization from the British Fabians, and from Great Britain also the idea of political laborisin. in contradiction of the American idea as expounded by Samuel Compels that the ground of organized labor's struggle was economic, not political. Gompers had once said lhal he would sooner be shot than become a number on a social security card." Then, in 1952. came Rise of Empire, one of the most powerful and lucid analyses of America's position today. "We have- crossed the boundary that lies between Republic and Empire. If you ask when, the answer is that you cannot make a single stroke between day and night; the precise moment does not matter. There was no painted sign to say: 'You now are entering Imper- ium.' Yet it was a very old road and the voice of history was saying: 'Whether you know it or not. the act of erossing may be irreversible.' And now, not far ahead, is a sign that reads: 'No U-turns.' "If you say there were no frightening omens, that is true. The political foundations did not quake, the graves of the fathers did not fly open, the Constitution did not tear itself up. If you say people did not will it, that also is true. But if you say therefore it has nol happened, then you have been so long bemused by words that your mind does not believe what the eye can see. even as in the jungle the terrified primitive, on meeting the lion, importunes magic by saying lo himself. 'He is not there.' "Thai a republic may vanish is an elementary school book fact. "The Roman Republic passed into the Roman Empire, and yet never could a Roman citizen have said, 'That was yesterday.' Nor is the historian, with all the advantages of perspective, able to place that momentous event at an exact point on the dial of time. The Republic had a long, unhappy twilight." Combined in one volume. 77ip People's Pottage, Garel Garrett's three mag- FACTS FORUM NEWS, October, 1955 Pane 49
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