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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 006. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/5.

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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 006. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/5

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 006, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/5.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript ■ 5 are' taking advantage of these situations. They don't charge true costs. They don't charge rent. They don't charge taxes. They don't charge for military employees. They don't charge for insurance. They have to show no profit, and they're unfair competition. Don't misunderstand me on this: the Hoover Commission does not want a single soldier denied the PX for his use. BURT: Mr. Combs, what do you think of the Hoover Commission's recommendations? Combs : With much of what our guest has said I am, of course, in accord. There are other areas in which, however, I would register most violent dissent. I understand that a task force of the Hoover Commission recommended the sale of TVA to private utilities, to private public utilities. But lhal was later modified to suggest a change in the accounting methods of TVA to require' the government to figure in taxes and other items in TVA costs—items which, of course, don't appear in actuality in the administrative expense of running TVA. But it is in this area that it seems to me, in all deference to our guest of the evening, that the Hoover Commission has usurped some policymaking functions and is entering a highly controversial field in which it mav vitiate much of the good that it is doing in these other admittedly responsible areas. M\cNeil: The Hoover Commission, by the law that set it up, is charged with the duty of dealing with policy. And. by the way, it's even got the authority from Congress to recommend constitutional amendments. Combs: I doubt that that's constitutional. MacNeil: Well, any citizen can recommend constitutional amendments. Combs: However, this is an agency of government. MacNeil: That's a side issue. If you're a student of power you'll find that the first multiple dam in the 1 nited States was set up in 1928 hy Mr. Hoover. I might remark that the thing you dealt with—the task force—is an office document. It's not a report of the Commission. It's a task paper. It leaked out. and it leaked out very inaccurately, and the Commission is not doing what you are saying it's going to do. Buckley: Are you saying, Mr. MacNeil, tbat it will not be the recommendation of the Hoover Commission to sell the TVA to private power? MacNeil: That's quite right. BUCKLEY: I regret that very much. However. I do think that to the extent that they aim in that direction by exploding such myths as that govern- Page 4 ment power is cheaper than private power, to that extent— Combs: Oh, well, government power is cheaper than private power. And there's no argument about it— MacNeil: Power from public power is no cheaper than any other power when all the costs involved are put in. It's cheaper because some people don't pay the true costs. Combs: Now let me tell you something, Mr. MacNeil: the reason that you're wrong is a very simple one . . . I also am experienced in this realm of public utilities and power. The reason that government power, even if you include certain accounting costs which should not enter into the picture', is cheaper than power manufactured by our private utilities is very simple. The private utilities always retain in their rate base—that is. the evaluation of their property for rate-making purposes — obsolete equipment, inflated equipment, and they also operate on something known as reproduction costs of those facilities instead of the historical costs to them, and as a result of that, and complacent public service commissions in the states, they manage to rook the public royally and consistently all of the time. Buckley: Pure demagoguery. In the first place, depletion is fixed by law. It's an accounting factor that is not left to the caprice of individual . . . Combs: I'm talking about rate bases. It should be an element of cost. Burt: I'm going to interrupt this because we're getting into an argument about public vs. private power, and it's not what we're talking about. MacNeil: May I say a word about the Hoover Commission's report on water resources? . . . It's the first time in the history of the United States that a proper study has been made of all these things, and it's going to be very illuminating. It's going to give the public the facts for the first time. BURT: We have a report here which ultimately is going to be three million words long. It has a million facts in it. Do you think there will be congressional resistance to enactment of these reports? MacNeil: I think some of the reports, some of the recommendations, are highly controversial. We're not picking our spots for economies or anything of that kind. We're not trying to salve up certain people, and we're not trying to get votes, incidentallv. We're trying to give the facts to the American public as they come. The only instruction that we have had from Mr. Hoover is to get the rails and give them to the public. In doing so. certain people didn't like some of the facts we brought up. We didn't make the facts. We simply reporl them. BURT: Mr. MacNeil, how much of the public is going to read three million words? MacNeil: None. You don't read a daily paper through. You read what interests you and what concerns you. And our report is made to the Congress and this report goes into the archives and goes to all the libraries and the students will read it. The people dealing with the various functions of government will read it. The committees of Congress will read it, the ones that concern them, and so on. BURT: Won't you have a situation arising, Mr. MacNeil. of special interest groups gathering concentrated strength to oppose your recommendations? MacNeil: Yes. That's happened already. It even happened before the reports were made, and the most violent of all those were in the public power area. COMBS: Well, naturally, that's where the public interest is the most deeply touched. MacNeil: Four national organizations were formed of propagandists to fight the Hoover reporl on power before the task force was even formed. Buckley: I can certainly understand that, for example, the residents of Idaho would be much more interested in having lhe citizens of New York pay for their power than paying for it them- M'his. The question is, who is getting rooked? Combs: That isn't the question at all. The entire matter of power such as is represented by the Tennessee Valley Authority is a national rather than a regional matter. It enriches the economy of the whole country. We deal with dust bowls—erosion is a national problem. Why not the enrichment of our economy? BURT: Mr. MacNeil, outside of public power where else will you encounter resistance—major resistance—to your recommendation? MacNeil: We have made an effort to bring out all the hidden subsidies. I notice the REA is crying aloud. I notice the veterans are crying aloud. We trv (o stop a lot of chiseling in governmenl. incidentally. Combs: The veterans are chiseling? MacNeil: I didn't say that. But the chiselers are yelling. They don'l like it. BURT: Are you going to be very good at stopping what you call chiseling? Mai Neil: No. but I think the American public will be. We're just giving them the facts. BURT: The question is, can the American public be interested enough in the whole to apply enough pressure on their side to counteract the pressure of special interest groups? MacNeil: No, I doubt that. The previous Hoover Commission made 273 recommendations. They finished up in '49, and so far 196 have been carried into effect. I ihink it's better than 72 per cent. FACTS FORUM NEWS, October, 1955
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