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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
File 048
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 048. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/47.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 048. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/47

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 048, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/47.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 048
Transcript The Basic Law of Life LOADSTONE of SUCCESS By B. Carroll Reece, V. S. Congressman from Tennessee Thi* address was delivered at commeneement exercises, Elizabethteen High School, Elizabeth- Ion. Tennessee. In the- authors words it is concerned with -a basic [act nf life- that during tin- last few decades has almost heen kept a secret from America's young people—the principle of behavior that insures a happy and prosperous life." Hr.KY. is llie basic law of life I want to tell you about: happiness and success come from conscientious discharge of duty. I cannot tell you precisely why this is true regarding happiness because the reason lies locked up in the mysteries of human nature. But I think I can partially prove it to you from your own experience: Is it not true that the most happy memories you have are recollections of unpleasant and difficult situations which you were, through your own power, able to overcome? Can you remember with any pleasure the unpleasant situations where all you did was sidestep your responsibility? Doing one's duty is almost never easy. In fail, in the beginning, it is almost always difficult. The capacity to discharge duty must be made into a habit, and as you know, all human habits—good or bad—are acquired by simply repeating the same actions until they become second nature. This automatic response to duty is not an easy habit to acquire because each of us is two different persons—the first being the person who wants to take the easy way out. and (he second being the person who knows instinctively that, in the long run. there is no easy way. You have to learn to conquer that first person, and every lime you whip him, the next time becomes easier. REWARDS OF DEVOTION TO DUTY If this sounds bleak and forbidding, let me tell you a few of the rewards that come from devotion to duty. Your first reward is your good opinion of yourself: you will feel belter, think better, and act with confidence and courage while other men are hesitant and afraid. The evasion of duty will make a coward of any man because without realizing it he destroys his most precious asset—his respect for himself. Your second reward for devotion to duty is the good opinion of other peo- Page 46 pie—at least the people whose opinion counts. Your third reward is the friendship of the people you admire—and, as you will find out (if you have not already done so), friends are the most precious possessions of life. Your fourth reward is economie security. I do not know a single healthy person devoted to the conscientious discharge of duty that is not successful in his economic life. Brilliancy and talent do not have as much to do with business success as devotion to duty. In most walks of life, dependability of performance, is more highly rewarded than erratic brilliancy of performance, lor the simple reason that dependability is harder to find. It is true that a person's mental abilities may put a ceiling on his economic rewards, but if he is dependable that ceiling is not going to be very low and lhe man is not going to be unsuccessful. BASIC DUTIES DEFINED What kind of duties are there? First, there are the duties we* aue to ourselves — to maintain clean and healthy minds and bodies; to safeguard our personal reputations through proper conduct; to develop our minds to the best of our ability, along the lines to which they are best suited. These things we must do for our own self-interest. Second, there are the duties we owe to those who love us and depend upon us—our mothers, fathers, husbands, wives, children, and close friends. This is of tremendous importance for one simple reason—it is only by giving of ourselves that we receive the same considerations from others. Third, there are the duties we owe to the people we work for and with. Any business or professional enterprise is fundamentally a partnership proposition—we succeed not at the ex pense of other people but with other people. It is every person's duty to give his organization an honest day's work; to give his co-workers complete cooperation: to give the people who may work under him,a full measure of help and encouragement. There is one thing you must never fear—the results of helping everyone around you; in the long run, you will be repaid many times over. This brings me to another type of duty — the type that I should know thoroughly because most of my life has been spent in public service. This is the duty each of us owes to his country. This duty consists of much more than me re- devotion to the flag and the willingness to bear arms in its defense. It involves an understanding of what America is, how it got that way, and how it can stay that way. I realize that this kind of talk mav be considered old-fashioned sentimentalism beeause the fundamental idea of Americans defending the American way of life has, during the last twenty years, been placed under a cloud of suspicion. It has been smeared with the dirt of such phrases as super-patriotism, isolation isin. nationalism, and even Fascism. It has been portrayed as an expression of selfishness that endangers the future of the free world and even the future of America. All this is bald-faced nonsense. In fact, the truth lies in the opposite direction: lhe hope of a better world lies ii] an America whose traditions, institutions, and ways of life are loved and defended by its people. Let's see why this is true. We all know that people improve primarily by observing and copying the behavior of people who are more successful and happy. They see a good example and follow it. America stands alone as an example of the high level of human happiness, prosperity, and mutual security that can be achieved by free men working in their own interests within the frame- work of a system of privately-owned tools of production used competitively, without monopoly, without special favor, and without special privilege, other than that earned by personal achieve ment. Our institutions, based upon our constitution, are the foundation of this freedom. Our individual prosperity and our magnificently developed economy reflect freedom's magical effects upon human nature. Our way of life is rooted in tin- l)i vine intention that every man is meant FACTS FORUM NEWS, October, 1955
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