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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 041. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/40.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 041. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/40

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 041, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/40.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 041
Transcript from anywhere, and I thus learned for the first time lhat the blue chips were down. This was much more serious than I had any idea. Here were not defendants who were trying to be acquitted! I really think that if they had tried the case along traditional American lines it might have had a different result. I don't know why, but they did not—they tried it along lines that were invented somewhere else, somewhere outside of the territorial limits of the United States of America. What they were trying to do, instead of getting an acquittal, was first to spread Communist propaganda. From morning 'til night they were at it all the time—all the time—all the time. I found as day after day went by that thc only alternative was to break up the trial and thus demonstrate that American justice was unequal to the task of trying a Communist. That is the way the blue chips were down and it was those delegations that gave me the tipoff. That is when I started tbat regime of mine that you read about. I parceled out every minute of my day so that I did the same things at the same lime every day. I got up at the same lime. I went to bed al tbe same time, I ate my meals at exactly lhe same hour every day. When I came up for my lunch—you can wonder how I ate so many lamb chops and spinach, but I had a lamp chop and spinach every single day at the identical hour, and then I lav down for that nap, II took me a little time to get used to it the first week, bul pretty soon by doing it just exactly the same every day I did get used to it. If you want to conserve energy, physical energy and intellectual energy, that regime of doing the same thing at the same time is the greatest way to conserve energy that I think you can possibly find. After a week or so I would lay down, go to sleep immediately, sleep there for a certain; period of time and then wake up and gel back to work and get down into the courtroom again. I kept that up for the whole rest of that trial. I want to get over to you in some way the efforts they made to break up that trial. It is pretty hard for people to L'reisp the ingenuity that these people have, ^ oil are all familiar with the shouting out around in lhe courtroom and accusing me of being a crook and accusing me of all kinds of wrongdoing, lt is pretty hard for a judge to stand there day after day and have lhat go on. knowing thai if you start putting one of those lawyers in jail you an- going to break up the rase, that it would lake months of lime for some new lawyer to be put on the job who would learn about thc case, and if you had a lawyer in jail he certainly could nol advise his client any more. And imposing a fine—why you can imagine those fellows over there in the Kremlin, vou can imagine the smiling lie v would do at putting up a few dollars for the fellow looking the judge in the eye and calling him a crook. Why, Ihey would be al that from morning until night every clay. They had a differenl line ihey started about every six vvi'eks. One of these lines was accusing me right in open Court of being a discriminator. The lawyers looked me right in the eye and would say how 1 haled tbe Jews and how I hated the Negroes, and bow the Jews were always supposed to be- excluded from everything, and how the Negroes were always supposed to be excluded from everv tiling emd all this and thai. They kept at me all of the time in open court about my being a discriminator and being disqualified and all this and that. Bul what was happening outside the courtroom? They got up handbills lhat described me as a monster sort of discriminator, and they would take those handbills and in the subways they would put them into people's pockets when thev were not looking. A person woulel gel home and put his bands in his pockets and there was one of those handbills. Thev pul them in parked automobiles, particularly in the more dilapidated kind of automobiles in the poorer lections of the city. They were pushed under doors in apartment houses—so that, of course, dozens and dozens of those came back to me. The people would write in and say. "What is lhe matter with you, Judge? What have you got against the Negroes? Why do you hate the Jews the way you do?" Well, if in your soul you think it is wrong to discriminate against people who are different—and then are told clay after day that you are just the kind of person that you would hate yourself to be, I tell you it hurts. You think that other people will believe it. You wonder if maybe somewhere in your inner consciousness there is some truth in il. You see these fellows are awfully shrewd, psychologically. An honest person is never so awfully sure he is righl. Ib- wonders—he wonders if there is something in it. Can il be that I have fooled myself about this? That I feel as I think I do, but maybe way down behind I am different—well, that is the' sort of thing they did. Then we came along to the big efforts to break up the trial. The first of those, I think, chronologically, was one day we had one of these defendants on the stand being cross- examined and he was asked a question that was a perfectly proper question on crosscxamination. It was objected to on the ground that it was an infringement of his constitutional privilege not to testify against himself and thus incriminate himself. I said to the lawyer, "This man took the witness stand in his own defense voluntarily. He did not have to do that, and I think this is a proper question, lent I am not going to lake a chance about it. I am going to think about it overnight." I said to this witness. "Now, you talk to your lawyers overnight about this and I will rule on it in the morning, but I think this question is a proper question." We got back in the morning on the third day of June, 1949, I will never forget, and wc started out. The United States Attorney withdrew lhal question and then he put another one lo him lhat was even clearer than the first. It was objected to. I overruled the objection. After I overruled the objection the witness then asserted his constitutional privilege. I overruled his constitutional privilege and directed him to answer, and when he refused to answer I said. "I sentence you to prison for thirty days for contempt of court or until you sooner purge yourself of contempt." I suppose that everybody in that courtroom vvilh the exception of the lawyers for the government—clerks, marshals, etc.—were Communist sympathizers. They would get in there every day. They would get in lhe line about eight o'clock in the morning, so when the doors opened —Wide World Photo Eleven top-ranking Communist leaders in the United States during their conspiracy trial in New York City, October, 1949. Left to right, front, are: Robert Thompson, 34; Henry Winston, 35; Eugene Dennis, 44; Gus Hall. 39; and John Williamson, 46. Left to right, rear, are: Jacob Stachel, 49; Irving Potash, 46; Carl Winter, 43; Benjamin Davis, 46; John Gates, 36, and Gilbert Green, 43. FACTS FORUM NEWS, October, 1955 Tage 39
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