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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
File 040
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 040. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/39.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 040. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/39

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 040, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/39.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 040
Transcript Judge Medina presided over the sensational trial in 1949 of lhe leaders of the U. S. Communist party, a trial which lasted for nine months and ended in the conviction of all eleven of the accused for conspiring to advocate the overthrow of the government by violence. In 1931 he became a circuit judge of the U. S. Court of Appeals. Following is a speech Judge Medina delivered recently before the Illinois State liar Association. The Inside Story of the Trial of the Eleven Communists By Judge Harold l>. Medina I am going to tell you something of the inside story of the Communist trial. It is six years ago now. I thought people would have forgotten all about it long ago. I resolved when it was over that I would not say anything about it and I did not for years. I thought I should not, especially when the case was on appeal, and years went on; but now ... I am going to do it. One of the first things I began to hear in that trial was Abraham Lincoln. They took all of our great American characters and they tied their own propaganda on to those names. To the ignorant and the ill-informed they seemed so plausible! Abraham Lincoln was one of their key words. They were always talking about him and oh! how he must have turned in his grave when he heard them taking bis name in vain as Ihey did. When I started in with that trial I had an idea that it was going to be kind of rough, and that the Communists were people who wanted to divide up other people's property and make trouble and all thai, but I was like most of you people, I didn't believe all that I read in the papers. I was verv skeplieal about all this tie-up with Soviet Rus- sia, and I had no conception at all of what I was going to be up against. I did study with some care the record in a previous sedition trial where the judge wore himself out and died. I read about a good deal of shouting and arguing and gavel banging and punishing people for contempt during the continuance of that trial, until the judge wore himself (low n: and I said to myself I wouldn't do that. And so, without any real understanding of what was coming. I started in. To begin with I had to deal vvilh delegation number one. I said, now those fellows are Americans and somehodv has got to tell ihem what American justice is like, so 1 brought them in and I said, "Now look here, what do you fellows want hen-.'" "Well, this is a political persecution and these fellows and this case ought lo be thrown out," and this and that and this and that. I said, "Now you have no business coming around and telling the judge what to do with the case. That is un-American. We don't do things lhal way. What would you think of it if some rich man or some politician who had no business to come around, came around to my chambers and started telling me how to decide a case? Now you fellows get on out of here." But there was another delegation—maybe two or three —from some rubber factory in Ohio or from someplace down in Mississippi, or from someplace out in the slate of Washington, or from Oklahoma. There were delegations, delegations, delegations. When I got through with one delegation there was always another delegation, and then- I was. figuring I was kind of representing America. I was trying to tell these people thai vve Americans can't do this kind of ihing. Each one had to put in his two cents worth, and then when I gol them out there was another bunch wailing there from all over this great United States of America, Every part of America. There were housewives delegations, veteran-' delegations, purple heart veterans' delegations, and workers' delegations of every name, nature and description, from the South, from the North, and all over the country. I lost a couple of days and I went without my lunch seeing those fellows. I didn't get out of the courthouse until half past seven or eight at night, until all of a sudden I said, "Why. Harold, this is just an organized effort here." Why 1 didn't see il quicker I don't know, but you can put yourself in my position. I wanted these people lo understand you jusl can't do this sort of thing. They looked like ordinary Americans— they didn't look like these Commies are supposed to look at all. Then I said, "No more delegations." and it vvas jusl as though I had turned off a faucet. Jusl let this soak in for a minute. Think of thc power of that organization. That they could get all those fellows coming, although whether they really came from all those places or not I had no means of knowing: but I believe that they did. But when lhal particular strategy reached its end. and I said no more delegations, they stopped instantly. Not a single one turned up Page 38 FACTS FORUM NEWS, October. 1955
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