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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 031. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 29, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/30.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 031. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/30

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 031, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 29, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/30.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 031
Transcript SansmasMBal W e have that intangible source of strength that was so brilliantly emphasized in the recent Bandung conference, the spiritual values of freedom, the history of a people thai cast off the yoke of colonialism, the thrilling and inspiring story of a new nation conceived in liberty, with a government of tin- people', by the people, and for the people. Our leaders were far too pessimistic about the Bandung conference. Official statements indicated that the Asian-African conference might very well become a propaganda springboard for the forces of communism in the Far Easl. We again underestimated the importance of this conference. Our government hesitated to even send official greetings. We apparently underestimated the greal reservoir of good will that still exists in Asia and Africa for America the America lhal had given freedom to the Philippines and Cuba, for the America that has always championed the self-determination of peoples. It was spiritual values and political idealism—yes, the moral forces that have made our country greal—that served as our ally, our defender in this unique and all-important meeting of the Asian and African nalions. I know we Americans take all of ibis for granted, but it truly is the good news of the 20th century. Millions of people in Asia and Africa are repealing in their own way the dramatic story of American independence. They are doing whal We did. We, above all people, should he Understanding and sympathetic to their cause. There is an identity of interest, of purpose, and of history, if we will but see it and make ourselves a part of it. National independence, self-determination, liberation from colonialism—all of this we have experienced. This is our message lo the world. This message. found in the Declaration of Independence, has given faith to millions of people seeking dignity in all corners <>! 'he globe. This message of faith in human brotherhood and in human equality is our reservoir of good will in 'In- world. It was this message thai found its way into every speech at Banning, save that of Chou En-lai. It is the Ipiritual and political values that make "in society what it is, that really topped 'lie news in the Asian-African confer- ' ii',-. \mi-i iea weis respected not for her ■'loin bombs or her wealth, but for her ■deals and her history. We must be true •o these. To the extent that we have lost friends, ^e have done so because we have forgotten lhe message of human brother- flood and equality, or forgotten to Preach and live that message. The time is ready for us to dedicate °ur talents, our resource's, to winning •he colli war. not just stabilizing it. Specifically, 1 suggest, firsl. we join with the spiril of nationalism lhal grips the underdeveloped and underprivileged countries. Remind these people that we too are the children of self-determination, of revolution, and of a will to freedom and independence. Second, respect the so-called neutralism of newborn nations, and make il clear that we understand their neutralism to be one predicated on independence, self-determination, and self-government. We must understand this neutralism and what it is—namely, a spirit of nationalism in former colonial areas. These neutral nations do not want to be appendages to Soviet imperialism or Western collective security. They have unhappy memories of exploitation by certain Western European countries who are now our allies. Their leaders have a keen awareness of the dangers of Communist infiltration and subversion and have taken strong measures to defeat the Communist conspiracy. These neutrals are not pro-Communist—they are pro-themselves. And I suggest that eis long as nations remain free, as long as the new nalions of Asia and Africa work for themselves, create self-governments, build their own economies, they are in fact strengthening the forces of freedom in the world. Why are we so much more critical of the neutralism of Burma and India than we are of the neutralism of Switzerland. Finland, and Sweden. Surely we realize that our friends of Switzerland. Finland, and Sweden are pro-democratic, pro-freedom. We admire their qualities, we admire their democracy, we herald their accomplishments. Let us be equally tolerant with the Asian nalions. Third, we should engage in greater use of our capital through international organizations such as tin- I \. the World Bank, and other international financial development groups—doing much more than we ever contemplate, not on the basis of gifts, but on the basis of long- term loans. Fourth, we should step up our own Point Four, but even more important, work through the UN and offer to greatly expand 1 \ technical assistance. Let us take the initiative in ibis area. Fifth, let us use our blessings of food and fiber. We ran proceed through the UN, offering vast quantities of food and liber to be placed under the general direction of the UN Food and Fiber Reserve. Here we can seize the initiative. We have the food and fiber—we can call upon others to share. Sixth, we must sel a good standard at home—revise our immigration laws, im- me-ilieilelv liberalize- our refugee act, implement our program of civil rights. Any acl of Congress thai gives offense lo large segments of free peoples of the world adversely affects American foreign policy. Our present immigration laws reflect adversely upon many people and do a disservice to the true tradition of the United States. Seventh, we should authorize a dramatic expansion of student exchange, along with the exchange of technicians, professional people, farmers, laborers, businessmen, journalists, and others engaged in public communication. Eighth, unstinting support of the I N, with particular emphasis on the World Health Organization, Food and Agriculture, Children's Emergency Fund. These programs represent America's compassion and generosity exercised in a spirit of international cooperation. Ninth, the systematic reduction of tariffs and other artificial obstacles to world trade, including re-examination of East-West trade restrictions. Tenth, we must make unceasing efforts toward the reduction of armaments and the realization of universal disarmament. Let us instill spirit and meaning into the disarmament discussions by demonstrating imagination. Let us offer to join with the rest of the world in reducing and then eliminating our armaments race, accompanied by a joint pledge that we spend a portion of the money we thereby save in helping to eliminate poverty in the world. The proposal of the late Senator Brien McMahon is one which should constantly be in the forefront of our minds as we participate in the disarmament discussions. I welcome the proposal of the President in creating the Office of Special Assistant in Charge of Disarmament. I now hope that my own proposal for the creation of a Special Subcommittee on Disarmament thai is to match the action of thc Executive and strengthen our hand for disarmament will be accepted. I have emphasized our more active participation in lhe I nited Nations, and its related agencies, because I am convinced that the most practical approach to the areas of Asia and Africa is through the United Nations. This greal organization will be only as strong as the use that is made of it. It can only- do as much as it is permitted to do by the great powers. Our entire international policy is based on our adherence to and respect for the Charter of the United Nations. We must become champions of that charter. On every occasion, in every conference, in every policy statement, we must relate our actions to the fulfillment of the principles of the United Nations Charter. The Charter of the United Nations is for the world what the Declaration of Independence is for us. Il is a world charter of freedom and justice. It is lhe 20th century Declaration of Interdependence. I recognize the weaknesses of the United Nations. But I also recognize PACTS FORUM NEWS, October, 1955 Page 29
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