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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 030. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/29.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 030. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/29

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955 - File 030, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/69/show/29.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 9, October 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 9, October 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date unknown
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 030
Transcript we face the mosl powerful and diabolical menace the world has ever known. Having said this, what do we do? I offer these suggestions: (11 Until some foolproof, ironclad universal system of disarmament can he arrived at and fully agreed to with proper supervision, or other protective de* we must maintain in cooperation with our allies a powerful defense force. The heart anil core of that defense force must he continuing anel expanding emphasis upon research and development. This includes both basic anil applied research. Here the present administration flounders ami vacillates. Nor will slogans suffice—"bigger leanei for a buck" does not mean greater defense. I am not a military expert, but I do suggest that it should be a matter of firm national policy that this nation have the irreatest air force in the world— modern, available, combat effective. The Air Force, of course, must be supported by modern weapons. We cannot afford to be second best, nor can we be satisfied with having the planes on the drafting board or the modern weapons at laboratory research state of development. I am talking about a defense force in being. Whatever the cost of that defense force we must be prepared to pay it. I reemphasize the importance of scientific and technological development. This means giving our scientists greater lee- »eiv. being less suspicious, recognizing that scientists frequently are unorthodox in their social and political views. There is a wide difference between disloyalty and nonconformity. We must protect our nation from disloyalty and subversion. But this does not necessarily mean discharging a scientist of foreign birth who maintains his citizenship in a country like Switzerland, who is a known anti-Communist. We need the intelligence and scientific know-how of freemen everywhere. Just as we have created a collective defense force in NATO. I suggest we build a collective scientific force among the free nations, pooling ideas and knowledge, and drawing from that common pool for the development of defense and the expansion and progress of the partners. To summarize, in the kind of world in which we live, a protective shield of Strength is the first essential of a program of security. That shield must never be lowered, that sword must never be sheathed, until all nations are willing to beat their swords into plowshares and make war no more. (21 1 have emphasized military strength, but I want it clear that military Btrengll naeisi lee supported ley a dynamic anel expanding economy. Therefore, the relations hetwecn defease policy and domestic, po- litical anel economic policy are one and inseparable. Tlie margin of superiority that wc neew maintain over the Soviet and its satellites is not in arms, hut in the reservoir of economic and political strength that is cve-r presenl in tree nations. The shield of strength that I have emphasized need not be brandished hefore friend and foe alike-. It should In- a shield, consistently maintained and quietly guarded. I suppose Teddy Roosevelt put it in the layman's language when he said, "Speak softly and carry the big stick." Regretfully, we have spoken loudly— very loudly—and the big stick that supposedly we were carrying wasn't Dearly as big as we thought it was, and most of the time not available. We have frightened our friends more than we have our foes by irresponsible talk. Too frequently public officials have talked of dropping bombs to solve different international situations. These A- bombs do not solve problems—they just dissolve things and people. Politically designed speeches, incorporating clever catch phrases, such as "massive retaliation," "agonizing reappraisal," "New Look." may make good headlines for an emotional public, but they do not make good policy, nor do they provide even strong defense. I suggest we get on with the business of building a security force second to none, and quit bragging, threatening, and boasting. Actually, if the present administration would be more frank and open about our state of preparedness—and less addieied to official secrecy and censorship, it would have a sobering effect on both the Congress and the public. Censorship compounded by propaganda is no substitute for freedom of information supported by fact-. Having once developed the kind of military security that is essential for the defense of free nations, let us remember lhat the ultimate answer to the problems that beset us is not lo be found in war. Military strength in this day and age is but a part of lhe apparatus of diplomacy, unless mankind indulges in lhe madness of thermo-nuclear warfare. No one can predict what the future will offer if such a catastrophe befalls us. We must look upon military strength as a means, one of several means, to arrive at agreements. . . . This has been referred to as negotiation from a position of strength. Rut that position of strength needs lo be- more than military power. The position of strength that we need, and must maintain, encompasses the closest cooperation with our allies. We must speak in one spirit—in unity for common objectives. The first principle of Soviet strategy is to divide us from our allies, to break up the grand alliance. To portray America as the real threat to the independence and self-determination of peoples and nations. Therefore, everv conceivable effort must be made for a meeting of the minds, for a common understanding bv the leaders of the nations of the free areas of the' world. This reepiires peltieneo along with respect for and confidence in our partners. We have allies, not satellites. We cannot bully and coerce. Wc can only seek to persuade and give counsel. Rut decisions arrived at through consultation and discussion are firm decisions—the privileged possession of all participants. I also urge that we give special attention to the attitudes and policies of our Asian, African, and Latin American neighbors. Negotiating from strength, therefore, means military power and political unity, based on mutual respect and confidence amongst the free nations. If we are correct in assuming that the Soviet does not now seek war, but rather seeks time and the easing of tensions, then we must re-examine our policies in light of this development, without sacrificing the first two essentials—military strength and political unity. Any step in the direction of relaxed tensions must be welcomed by us and we should lead in this effort, making it ever clear to the simplest soul in the far corners of the world that the nation of Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, Wilson, and Roosevelt is a nation of peace, of freedom, of compassion, and justice. I have been disturbed because of the reluctance of some of our top official- to recognize tbe opportunity that was at hand once the plan of a Big Four conference crystallized. This is no time for timid souls. This is the time for men of imagination, courage and daring. The peoples of the world are weary of the constant threat of nuclear war, and particularly when that threat keeps coming from us in the strident voices of small men. The peoples are looking for a clear and challenging political faith that will arouse them to self-determination and liberation from both political and social tyranny. The toxin of fear has run its course. \ tired eunl suffering humanity seeks lhe nourishing food of applied idealism. This is to our advantage. We are not warriors in the stricl interpretation of the word. Our history is traditionally one of an expanding democracy—tbe fulfillment of equality of opportunity, the relation of human equality of law in the social order, and the dedication to a rising standard of living for all. It is these very virtues that fit the present world scene. II is lime, therefore, that we walk confidently in the stature, strength, and competence lhat our history and our presenl circumstances verify. In a world that is desperately in need of capital, we have the greatest capital resources among all nations. In a world where people are anxious for the blessings of science and technology, we are richly endowed with these blessings. In a world when' lhe majority of people are ill- housed, ill-fed and ill-clad, we are privi- le-gi-d to have em abundance of food and fiber and the knowledge of scientific progress for health and shelter. Pace 28 FACTS FORUM NEWS, October, 1955
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